Matching Items (4)

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Spin-orbit engineering in transition metal dichalcogenide alloy monolayers

Description

Binary transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers share common properties such as a direct optical bandgap, spin-orbit splittings of hundreds of meV, light–matter interaction dominated by robust excitons and coupled spin-valley states.

Binary transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers share common properties such as a direct optical bandgap, spin-orbit splittings of hundreds of meV, light–matter interaction dominated by robust excitons and coupled spin-valley states. Here we demonstrate spin-orbit-engineering in Mo[subscript (1−x)]W[subscript x]Se[subscript 2] alloy monolayers for optoelectronics and applications based on spin- and valley-control. We probe the impact of the tuning of the conduction band spin-orbit spin-splitting on the bright versus dark exciton population. For MoSe[subscript 2] monolayers, the photoluminescence intensity decreases as a function of temperature by an order of magnitude (4–300 K), whereas for WSe[subscript 2] we measure surprisingly an order of magnitude increase. The ternary material shows a trend between these two extreme behaviours. We also show a non-linear increase of the valley polarization as a function of tungsten concentration, where 40% tungsten incorporation is sufficient to achieve valley polarization as high as in binary WSe[subscript 2].

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Date Created
  • 2015-12-14

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Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorus nanoribbons at temperatures higher than 100 K

Description

Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons

Black phosphorus attracts enormous attention as a promising layered material for electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. Here we report large anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons along the zigzag and armchair lattice directions at variable temperatures. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out under the condition of steady-state longitudinal heat flow using suspended-pad micro-devices. We discovered increasing thermal conductivity anisotropy, up to a factor of two, with temperatures above 100 K. A size effect in thermal conductivity was also observed in which thinner nanoribbons show lower thermal conductivity. Analysed with the relaxation time approximation model using phonon dispersions obtained based on density function perturbation theory, the high anisotropy is attributed mainly to direction-dependent phonon dispersion and partially to phonon–phonon scattering. Our results revealing the intrinsic, orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of black phosphorus are useful for designing devices, as well as understanding fundamental physical properties of layered materials.

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Date Created
  • 2015-10-16

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Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

Description

We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)[subscript 2] sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS[subscript 2] for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties.

We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)[subscript 2] sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS[subscript 2] for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)[subscript 2] sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)[subscript 2] have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)[subscript 2] is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)[subscript 2] sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)[subscript 2] sheets together with CVD-MoS[subscript 2] in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS[subscript 2] sheets to Mg(OH)[subscript 2], naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)[subscript 2], but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

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Date Created
  • 2016-02-05

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Understanding environmental stability of two-dimensional materials and extending their shelf life by surface functionalization

Description

Since the discovery of graphene, two dimensional materials (2D materials) have become a focus of interest for material research due to their many unique physical properties embedded in their 2D

Since the discovery of graphene, two dimensional materials (2D materials) have become a focus of interest for material research due to their many unique physical properties embedded in their 2D structure. While they host many exciting potential applications, some of these 2D materials are subject to environmental instability issues induced by interaction between material and gas molecules in air, which poses a barrier to further application and manufacture. To overcome this, it is necessary to understand the origin of material instability and interaction with molecules commonly found in air, as well as developing a reproducible and manufacturing compatible method to post-process these materials to extend their lifetime. In this work, the very first investigation on environmental stability on Te containing anisotropic 2D materials such as GaTe and ZrTe3 is reported. Experimental results have demonstrated that freshly exfoliated GaTe quickly deteriorate in air, during which the Raman spectrum, surface morphology, and surface chemistry undergo drastic changes. Environmental Raman spectroscopy and XPS measurements demonstrate that H2O molecules in air interact strongly on the surface while O2, N2, and inert gases don't show any detrimental effects on GaTe surface. Moreover, the anisotropic properties of GaTe slowly disappear during the aging process. To prevent this gas/material interaction based surface transformation, diazonium based surface functionalization is adopted on these Te based 2D materials. Environmental Raman spectroscopy results demonstrate that the stability of functionalized Te based 2D materials exhibit much higher stability both in ambient and extreme conditions. Meanwhile, PL spectroscopy, angle resolved Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that many attractive physical properties of the material are not affected by surface functionalization. Overall, these findings unveil the degradation mechanism of Te based 2D materials as well as provide a way to significantly enhance their environmental stability through an inexpensive and reproducible surface chemical functionalization route.

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Date Created
  • 2017