Matching Items (3)

153707-Thumbnail Image.png

Performing embodiment: negotiating the body in the electroencephalographic music of David Rosenboom

Description

Beneath the epidermis, the human body contains a vibrant and complex ecology of interwoven rhythms such the heartbeat, the breath, the division of cells, and complex brain activity. By repurposing

Beneath the epidermis, the human body contains a vibrant and complex ecology of interwoven rhythms such the heartbeat, the breath, the division of cells, and complex brain activity. By repurposing emergent medical technology into real-time gestural sound controllers of electronic musical instruments, experimental musicians in the 1960s and 1970s – including David Rosenboom – began to realize the expressive potential of these biological sounds. Composers experimented with breath and heartbeat. They also used electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, which register various types of brain waves. Instead of using the sound of brain waves in fixed-media pieces, many composers took diverse approaches to the challenge of presenting this in live performance. Their performance practices suggest different notions of embodiment, a relationship in this music which has not been discussed in detail.

Rosenboom reflects extensively on this performance practice. He supports his EEG research with theory about the practice of biofeedback. Rosenboom’s work with EEG sensors spans several decades and continue today, which has allowed him to make use of advancing sensing and computing technologies. For instance, in his 1976 On Being Invisible, the culmination of his work with EEG, he makes use of analyzed EEG data to drive a co-improvising musical system.

In this thesis, I parse different notions of embodiment in the performance of EEG music. Through a critical analysis of examples from the discourse surrounding EEG music in its early years, I show that cultural perception of EEG sonification points to imaginative speculations about the practice’s potentials; these fantasies have fascinating ramifications on the role of the body in this music’s performance. Juxtaposing these with Rosenboom, I contend that he cultivated an embodied performance practice of the EEG. To show how this might be manifest in performance, I consider two recordings of On Being Invisible.

As few musicologists have investigated this particular strain of musical experimentalism, I hope to contextualize biofeedback musicianship by offering an embodied reading of this milestone work for EEG.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

153656-Thumbnail Image.png

A maker's mechanological paradigm: seeing experiential media systems as structurally determined

Description

Wittgenstein’s claim: anytime something is seen, it is necessarily seen as something, forms the philosophical foundation of this research. I synthesize theories and philosophies from Simondon, Maturana, Varela, Wittgenstein, Pye,

Wittgenstein’s claim: anytime something is seen, it is necessarily seen as something, forms the philosophical foundation of this research. I synthesize theories and philosophies from Simondon, Maturana, Varela, Wittgenstein, Pye, Sennett, and Reddy in a research process I identify as a paradigm construction project. My personal studio practice of inventing experiential media systems is a key part of this research and illustrates, with practical examples, my philosophical arguments from a range of points of observation. I see media systems as technical objects, and see technical objects as structurally determined systems, in which the structure of the system determines its organization. I identify making, the process of determining structure, as a form of structural coupling and see structural coupling as a means of knowing material. I introduce my theory of conceptual plurifunctionality as an extension to Simondon’s theory. Aspects of materiality are presented as a means of seeing material and immaterial systems, including cultural systems. I seek to answer the questions: How is structure seen as determining the organization of systems, and making seen as a process in which the resulting structures of technical objects and the maker are co-determined? How might an understanding of structure and organization be applied to the invention of contemporary experiential media systems?

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

154633-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis of habitual patterns in vernacular movement

Description

This thesis aims to explore the language of different bodies in the field of dance by analyzing

the habitual patterns of dancers from different backgrounds and vernaculars. Contextually,

the term habitual patterns

This thesis aims to explore the language of different bodies in the field of dance by analyzing

the habitual patterns of dancers from different backgrounds and vernaculars. Contextually,

the term habitual patterns is defined as the postures or poses that tend to re-appear,

often unintentionally, as the dancer performs improvisational dance. The focus lies in exposing

the movement vocabulary of a dancer to reveal his/her unique fingerprint.

The proposed approach for uncovering these movement patterns is to use a clustering

technique; mainly k-means. In addition to a static method of analysis, this paper uses

an online method of clustering using a streaming variant of k-means that integrates into

the flow of components that can be used in a real-time interactive dance performance. The

computational system is trained by the dancer to discover identifying patterns and therefore

it enables a feedback loop resulting in a rich exchange between dancer and machine. This

can help break a dancer’s tendency to create similar postures, explore larger kinespheric

space and invent movement beyond their current capabilities.

This paper describes a project that distinguishes itself in that it uses a custom database

that is curated for the purpose of highlighting the similarities and differences between various

movement forms. It puts particular emphasis on the process of choosing source movement

qualitatively, before the technological capture process begins.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016