Matching Items (5)

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An evaluation of discussion board instructions in online courses

Description

The discussion board is a facet of online education that continues to confound students, educators, and researchers alike. Currently, the majority of research insists that instructors should structure and control online discussions as well as evaluate such discussions. However, the

The discussion board is a facet of online education that continues to confound students, educators, and researchers alike. Currently, the majority of research insists that instructors should structure and control online discussions as well as evaluate such discussions. However, the existing literature has yet to compare the various strategies that instructors have identified and employed to facilitate discussion board participation. How should instructors communicate their expectations online? Should instructors create detailed instructions that outline and model exactly how students should participate, or should generalized instructions be communicated? An experiment was conducted in an online course for undergraduate students at Arizona State University. Three variations of instructional conditions were developed for use in the experiment: (1) detailed, (2) general, and (3) limited. The results of the experiment indentified a pedagogically valuable finding that should positively influence the design of future online courses that utilize discussion boards.

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Date Created
2012

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Contested safety

Description

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) have a polarizing effect in the US. The first commercially viable GMO was Roundup Ready Soy, introduced by Monsanto in 1996, to be used in conjunction with Roundup herbicides. This thesis investigated and delineated the development

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) have a polarizing effect in the US. The first commercially viable GMO was Roundup Ready Soy, introduced by Monsanto in 1996, to be used in conjunction with Roundup herbicides. This thesis investigated and delineated the development and deployments of the discourse of Monsanto’s agricultural assemblage of Roundup Ready seeds and Roundup herbicides and its resistant discourses. Monsanto builds its discourse around the safety and necessity of Roundup Ready seeds through federal regulation and toxicology studies. Resistant discourses deployed by Monsanto’s critics problematize Roundup safety and reject Monsanto’s contention that GMOs are necessary for meeting world’s food demands. The discourse analysis pursued in this thesis explored interactions between the dominant discourse and counter discourses and charted their deployments in Colorado’s and Oregon’s 2014 ballot measures that would have required mandatory GMO labeling. Analysis suggested counter discourses were successful in mobilizing people to engage civically.

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2015

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Bringing Asian Epistemologies to Western Contexts: A Relational Approach in Times of Crisis

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In this dissertation, I explore the researched and lived potential afforded by the principle of interrelationality from the culturally situated Asian approach espoused in Yoshitaka Miike’s (2008, 2012, 2013, 2017) metatheory of Asiacentricity and Kuan-Hsing Chen’s (2010) Asia as method.

In this dissertation, I explore the researched and lived potential afforded by the principle of interrelationality from the culturally situated Asian approach espoused in Yoshitaka Miike’s (2008, 2012, 2013, 2017) metatheory of Asiacentricity and Kuan-Hsing Chen’s (2010) Asia as method. This work addresses the limitations of binary logics as a Eurocentric modern tool and proposes an Asiacentric dynamic orientation to research. I draw on Asiacentricity’s principles of harmony, interrelatedness, feelings, and flux to guide an ongoing experimentation to find meaning in relation to others in a Western context. I turn to Asia as method as an additional point of inspiration to transform knowledge production by looking to Asiacentric social ontologies to inform my methodology. Inspired by Chinese medicinal dynamic theories of practice rooted in Asian philosophy, I propose an ethico-onto-epistemological approach to research where researchers approach work through equal measures of theoretical absorption, observation of theory in practice, and an active personal exploration of theoretical application, treating one’s data with inherent energetic potential. This work found that orientations of complementarity and interdependent poiesis are crucial to engage in Asiacentric relationality, and that an Asiacentric methodology is guided by tenets of living one’s research, engaging the dynamism of the world and oneself as researcher, and embracing connectedness through an acceptance of incompletion.

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Date Created
2021

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Here Comes the Sun!: Toward a Critical Ecological Rhetoric for the Anthropocene

Description

The geologic epoch of the Anthropocene, or the age of human domination, is a metacondition animated by unprecedented planetary change. Global warming, regular mass extinction events, and ecological disaster wrought from human activity spell crisis for all planetary life while

The geologic epoch of the Anthropocene, or the age of human domination, is a metacondition animated by unprecedented planetary change. Global warming, regular mass extinction events, and ecological disaster wrought from human activity spell crisis for all planetary life while exacerbating dominative relations among the human species. Thus, the Anthropocene may be viewed as an age wherein spheres of precarity widen and (in)direct impacts of ecological disaster differentially harm populations predicated upon their predetermined social location under dominative governmental, economic, and social structures. This metacondition poses a challenge for activists, critical scholars, and critical pedagogues working toward social emancipation. To interpret and combat the complex and scalar logics of power in the Anthropocene, this critical/cultural, rhetoric, and performance project advances a turn toward what I term critical ecological rhetoric. Drawing inspiration from Félix Guattari’s The Three Ecologies and Raymie McKerrow’s critical rhetoric – two modes of theorizing which sought to articulate dominative relations under the metacondition of neoliberal hegemony –this critical ecosophical turn seeks to address power as dispersed across material, social, and psychological registers and as complexly entangled within the metacondition of the Anthropocene. An integral element of critical ecological rhetorical practice is demystifying the presence, construction, and defense of borders imposed within and between ecological registers, as such bordered constructs of difference serve to justify violent domination while concealing ecological logics of interconnectedness.Across three case studies which differently privilege one of three ecological registers, I demonstrate the dynamism of critical ecological rhetoric. In “Pyropolitical Phoenix,” materialist, elemental implications of governmentality in the urban ecology of Phoenix, Arizona are examined as a rhetorical circulation synecdochic of repressive relationships in urban ecologies under worsening conditions of climate change. In “I’m Real When I Shop My Face,” the circulation of glitch feminism by pop artist Sophie across digital media ecologies is examined to demonstrate capacities for queer worldmaking within cisnormative algorithmic architectures. In “All My Happiness Is Gone,” I examine my ecology of depression as enmeshed in complex genetic, social, and material entanglement.

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Date Created
2021