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Comparing Website Recall on Mobile Devices: Smartphones vs. Tablets

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Website usage on both smartphone and tablet devices is rapidly increasing. Website success hinges largely upon how well information on the site is recalled and perceived. The purpose of this study is to explore the question of whether or not

Website usage on both smartphone and tablet devices is rapidly increasing. Website success hinges largely upon how well information on the site is recalled and perceived. The purpose of this study is to explore the question of whether or not the differences in display size and resolution of smartphone versus tablet devices affect the recall of website information. I hypothesize that tablets will produce greater website recall than smartphones, due to their larger screen size and higher resolution which may reduce cognitive strain. During the study, participants viewed a sample website for two minutes on either an iPhone or iPad, and then participated in a brief 20 question memory test to evaluate how well they remembered the website information. Although test scores for the iPad users were about one test point higher than test scores for the iPhone users, the difference was not statistically significant. However, the study was limited by the low sample size (n = 94). This indicates that further research may find that tablets indeed allow for increased recall of certain kinds of website content.

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Date Created
2013-05

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Relationships among goals and flirting: a recall study

Description

The relationships between goals and specific flirting behaviors were investigated in a college population. Research questions and hypotheses were guided by Dillard's (1990) Goals-Plans-Action (GPA) model of interpersonal influence, which states that goals lead to planning processes, which, in turn,

The relationships between goals and specific flirting behaviors were investigated in a college population. Research questions and hypotheses were guided by Dillard's (1990) Goals-Plans-Action (GPA) model of interpersonal influence, which states that goals lead to planning processes, which, in turn, produce behavior. Six hundred and eighty-five undergraduates at a large southwestern university participated in an online survey assessing their behaviors in their most recent flirting interactions, their goals for that interaction, as well as measures designed to assess planning, the importance of the goal, and the number of goals present for the interaction. Results indicate that goals relate to the use of some, but not all behaviors, and that a flirting script may exist. Furthermore, planning, importance, and number of goals were all found to relate to the reporting of specific flirting behaviors. Sex differences were found as well, such that men reported using more forward and direct behaviors, while women reported using more facial expressions, self-touch, and laughing; men also reported flirting for sexual reasons more than women, and women reported flirting for more fun reasons that men. Overall, this study confirms the utility of the GPA framework for understanding the relationship between goals and flirting behavior, and suggests several avenues for future research.

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Date Created
2014