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Bitcoin: How Benefit and Cost Shape The Adoption of Virtual Currency

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Bitcoin is a form of virtual currency that can be used as a medium of exchange for goods or services. Different from other forms of virtual payment, bitcoin is de-centralized

Bitcoin is a form of virtual currency that can be used as a medium of exchange for goods or services. Different from other forms of virtual payment, bitcoin is de-centralized and puts all of the power in the hands of the user, rather than a banking institution. However, bitcoin's ability to develop as a renowned medium of exchange has been impeded, potentially due to a lack of knowledge, active bitcoin platforms, and support. In this paper, I conduct a survey to understand factors that affect households' adoption of bitcoin. In particular, I focus on factors that capture the potential benefit and cost of adopting bitcoin. Through a public survey, participants are asked a series of questions on their willingness to adopt bitcoin. I found significant results stating that subjects were more inclined toward bitcoin contingent upon the number of platforms accepting it, the number of acquaintances using bitcoin, and the degree of personal knowledge participants have about bitcoin. These findings suggest that perceived benefit captured by network effect and convenience of use, as well as the potential cost captured by uncertainty help shape the adoption of bitcoin.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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From Playground to Boardroom: Endowed Social Status and Managerial Performance

Description

By matching a CEO's place of residence in his or her formative years with U.S. Census survey data, I obtain an estimate of the CEO's family wealth and study the

By matching a CEO's place of residence in his or her formative years with U.S. Census survey data, I obtain an estimate of the CEO's family wealth and study the link between the CEO's endowed social status and firm performance. I find that, on average, CEOs born into poor families outperform those born into wealthy families, as measured by a variety of proxies for firm performance. There is no evidence of higher risk-taking by the CEOs from low social status backgrounds. Further, CEOs from less privileged families perform better in firms with high R&D spending but they underperform CEOs from wealthy families when firms operate in a more uncertain environment. Taken together, my results show that endowed family wealth of a CEO is useful in identifying his or her managerial ability.

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Date Created
  • 2018