Matching Items (17)

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Managerial Communication: Delegating Effectively

Description

Delegation is a very important skill for a manager to have in any organization and is of the utmost importance when it comes to tasks being executed. Often times, delegation

Delegation is a very important skill for a manager to have in any organization and is of the utmost importance when it comes to tasks being executed. Often times, delegation can be seen as something that managers dread because they do not want to give up their power and they feel that they can do it better. The notion of delegation can be something that is influenced by a variety of factors. For one, gender can be a driving force in how managers talk to their employees. In this project I will be exploring sections of Genderlect theory in how men and women's communication styles are received differently. Critical theory of communication approaches will also be explored. Also, the way in which delegation is used is what needs the most attention. That is where relational and nonverbal communication also come into play. All in all, the way in which society is constructed, delegation is a skill that needs to be mastered because the job needs to get done.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Mindfulness in the Workplace: Why It Matters

Description

The purpose of this project is to analyze the physical, mental, and interpersonal health benefits that "mindfulness" can bring to employees and upper division executives in numerous workplace settings. In

The purpose of this project is to analyze the physical, mental, and interpersonal health benefits that "mindfulness" can bring to employees and upper division executives in numerous workplace settings. In addition, this project also emphasizes the importance of having program implementation and how this could benefit employee and company success. The first portion consists of an academic literature review of the three categories of benefits on employee well-being in the workplace and how it can influence overall productivity and performance. Physical benefits include lower blood pressure; Mental benefits include lower levels of perceived stress; Interpersonal benefits include stronger relationship building and more efficient conflict resolution skills. Most research found proved to be statistically significant (mental and interpersonal benefits) whereas other research is still being practiced to produce significant results (physical and some mental health benefits). The second portion focuses on recent mindfulness programs that are established in well-known companies such as Aetna Insurance, the U.S. Marine Corps as well as a Counterproductive Work Study. All programs showed significant results in all three employee health categories when mindfulness was present. Finally, the third area of the project includes a suggested program outline that focuses on physical forms of meditation to enhance mindfulness along with happiness in conjunction with strengthening mental and interpersonal mindfulness skills.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Bring Your Forgiveness to Work: How to Employ Forgiveness as a Conflict Management Tool

Description

The objective of this project was to develop a forgiveness training program to be used at a corporate level in addition to the current conflict management strategies. In addition to

The objective of this project was to develop a forgiveness training program to be used at a corporate level in addition to the current conflict management strategies. In addition to teaching the value of forgiveness, this search also touches on resilience and how forgiveness increases our personal resiliency. Forgiveness and resilience have been closely linked in previous forgiveness research as they relate to reconciliation. Based on the research, forgiveness has been widely talked about in relation to religious practices, however it is now being discussed in relation to communication. In order to understand forgiveness as a communication process, one has to understand where it began and how the definition of forgiveness has evolved overtime. This project looks at how forgiveness creates value for the individual in terms of the relationship and expresses why forgiveness and reconciliation are not mutually exclusive. Forgiving an individual does not always lead to reconciling the relationship; however, making it so the individuals can continue working together is the goal at work. A key part of understanding forgiveness is being able to identify what forgiveness is not, as much of what we have been taught from a young age is the exact opposite. Adult learners are much different from any other type of learners due to the level of life experience they have -- which can often make it more challenging to rewrite concepts, like forgiveness. This project identifies the best ways to teach adult learners through the use of interactive handouts and videos that demonstrate the power of forgiveness in our day-to-day lives.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Queer Resilience: A Case Study of Long-term Same-sex Couples

Description

Abstract Communication scholars have begun to contribute to the theoretical understanding of resilience as a dynamic and collaborative process, which can be talked into being (Buzzanell, 2010). Previous research has

Abstract Communication scholars have begun to contribute to the theoretical understanding of resilience as a dynamic and collaborative process, which can be talked into being (Buzzanell, 2010). Previous research has examined the role of resilience in romantic couples, however, has focused disproportionately on heterosexual couples. This offers a limited, and singular understanding of how resilience is developed and sustained in romantic relationships. To better understand the scope and breadth of resilience, this study examined five same-sex couples through an in-depth qualitative case study analysis. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the small body of existing data, as well as, enhance our understanding of how resilience works in other contexts. Data was analyzed for thematic patterns, and compared to existing data on same-sex relationships. The findings supported that resilience is a collaborative process that is facilitated by communication. There were some discrepancies from the data collected in this study compared to previous findings; however, due to the small sample size, findings from this study cannot be generalized to the larger population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Exploring the Reasons: An emergent analysis of Thirteen Reasons Why and media

Description

Suicidality, understood as the risk of suicide with intent or the idea of suicide, has been increasingly prevalent in our country, yet the topic of suicidality is one that is

Suicidality, understood as the risk of suicide with intent or the idea of suicide, has been increasingly prevalent in our country, yet the topic of suicidality is one that is often spoken in hushed tones and behind closed doors (Pam, 2013). While suicide statistics trend upwards, there is a growing need to understand representations of suicidality, particularly within media (Centers for Disease Control, 2017). This thesis looks to explore the representations of suicidality in media, specifically Netflix’s original series, Thirteen Reasons Why. Data collection for this thesis will be collected from online social media forums dedicated to the show in the form of episode discussions reflecting on each episode in the season. Through an emergent, grounded analysis, this paper will address current representations of suicidality within Thirteen Reasons Why as well as identify common themes found in online social media forums. This research established common themes of resilience-enhancing, community building, and individuals feeling at-risk or triggered by representations of suicidality in Thirteen Reasons Why as found throughout the online social media forums.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Understanding romantically intimate relational escalation and de-escalation among high functioning individuals possessing an autism spectrum disorder

Description

Romantic relationships are an important aspect of anyone's life. For individuals with an autism spectrum disorder, this is true as well. However, these people may experience relational dynamics and trajectories

Romantic relationships are an important aspect of anyone's life. For individuals with an autism spectrum disorder, this is true as well. However, these people may experience relational dynamics and trajectories that are in some aspects either similar to or markedly different from those who are not on the spectrum. There are very few studies analyzing and understanding how adults with an ASD navigate romantic relationships. This particular study examined how turning points pertaining to relational escalation or de-escalation were recognized and understood by eight individuals (four men and four women) possessing an ASD. The Retrospective Interview Technique (RIT) was implemented in order to accrue data from participants. Each participant completed a RIT graph mapping out a romantic relationship of their choice by understanding when a turning point was identified and placing a mark next to the corresponding level of relational closeness or attachment. Once all turning points were mapped out, they were connected with lines so that a visual representation of the entire relationship may be viewed. Participants were then queried about how they knew that particular event (or mark) to be a turning point, how it impacted the relationship, and how they were, personally, influenced by it (how they responded to the event). Interviews were transcribed and explored through a grounded theory approach. Specifically, Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis method was applied to articulate interview data. The research revealed four main themes (Relational Genesis, Relational Escalation, Relational De-escalation and Conflict Management) as well as seventeen sub themes. Limitations for this study, information relating to discourses surrounding autism spectrum disorders and romantically intimate relationships, as well as, areas for future study are also discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Memorable messages and wildlife conservation

Description

Wildlife endangerment and extinction is a significant and pressing issue. Environmental research notes that if humans hope to preserve wildlife, change needs to occur within the next decade. Therefore, it

Wildlife endangerment and extinction is a significant and pressing issue. Environmental research notes that if humans hope to preserve wildlife, change needs to occur within the next decade. Therefore, it is important to understand the kinds of messages young adults are receiving about wildlife. This communication may affect their attitudes, beliefs, and ideals toward nature. Communication and socialization remain significant factors in cultivating environmental values in individuals. Memorable messages remain a socialization tool utilized to promote values in others.

This study explores the kinds of wildlife messages and underlying values individuals receive by asking them to recall a memorable wildlife message. The study analyzed 108 memorable messages from individuals between the ages of 18-35. The study employs a content analysis to examine message content and values. The study employed sensitizing concepts, such as Stern's Value-Belief-Norm theory to examine the messages’ underlying values, such as altruism and progressivism. Results indicate messages revolve around themes of preservation, stewardship, sanctity, domestication, and complexity of conservation. Of the 108 messages, 66 messages conveyed altruistic and progressive values as defined by Stern while other messages conveyed appreciation, awareness, and dominative values. Additionally, wildlife messages were received mostly through mediated sources. Implications for parents, the media, and wildlife are explored.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Bad ideology leads to bad behavior: why Muslim reformers must present an authoritative, comprehensive, and compelling counter-narrative to Islamism

Description

Belief affects behavior and rhetoric has the potential to bring about action. This paper is a critical content analysis of the ideology and rhetoric of key Islamist intellectuals and the

Belief affects behavior and rhetoric has the potential to bring about action. This paper is a critical content analysis of the ideology and rhetoric of key Islamist intellectuals and the Islamist organization Hizb ut-Tahrir, as stated on the website http://english.hizbuttahrir.org. The responses of specific Muslim Reformers are also analyzed. The central argument underlying this analysis centers on the notion that such Islamist ideology and its rhetorical delivery could be a significant trigger for the use of violence; interacting with, yet existing independently of, other factors that contribute to violent actions. In this case, a significant aspect of any solution to Islamist rhetoric would require that Muslim Reformers present a compelling counter-narrative to political Islam (Islamism), one that has an imperative to reduce the amount of violence in the region. Rhetoric alone cannot solve the many complicated issues in the region but we must begin somewhere and countering the explicit and implicit calls to violence of political Islamist organizations like Hizb ut-Tahrir seems a constructive step.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Emotion cycles, sensegiving, and sensebreaking in the municipal courtroom

Description

Municipal courtrooms are brimming with a variety of positive and negative emotions from defendants who are primarily encountering the criminal justice system for the first time. Municipal court judges and

Municipal courtrooms are brimming with a variety of positive and negative emotions from defendants who are primarily encountering the criminal justice system for the first time. Municipal court judges and bailiffs must work together and find ways to communicate important information about courtroom processes to up to 70-120 defendants a day. This dissertation investigates how municipal court judges and bailiffs from two municipal courthouses respond to three organizational challenges associated with emotion--defendant confusion about courtroom processes, handling high caseloads while treating defendants as customers of the court, and managing the serious and tedious emotional moods of the courtroom environment. Using qualitative methods of observation and informal and formal interviews, this dissertation analyzes how emotion cycles between judges and bailiffs help give sense to and break sense of defendants while simultaneously helping them navigate the challenges of their work. Findings detail the nature of work in municipal court--explaining the challenges associated with emotion that judges and bailiffs face on a daily basis. The data also describes the emotional roles that judges and bailiffs employ in the courtroom. The judges' emotional roles include tension relievers, order enforcers, and care takers. Bailiffs' emotional roles comprise rule enforcers, toxin handlers, and do gooders. The heart of the analysis explores how judges and bailiffs give sense to defendants when unexpected situations manifest in the courtroom and break sense of defendants who hold incorrect or less favored beliefs about courtroom procedures. The emotional displays and responses of judges, bailiffs, primary defendants (defendants before the judge), and third party defendants (those watching in the audience) enable sensegiving and sensebreaking to occur. The emotion cycles allow courtroom staff to impact the sensemaking process of defendants in a fast and efficient manner. Theoretical implications include extensions of emotion cycle research through a consideration of the displays and responses of primary agents, intermediate agents, and primary recipients of emotional displays. Practical implications describe how specific training practices and space for employee discussion could enhance the workplace wellness of judges and bailiffs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Family influences on highly-educated Chinese youths' smoking behaviors: extending the tramework of the theory of planned behavior

Description

Smoking prevalence has been a significant issue in China. This present study investigates family influences on the smoking behaviors of highly-educated Chinese youths (HECY) and explores whether family factors work

Smoking prevalence has been a significant issue in China. This present study investigates family influences on the smoking behaviors of highly-educated Chinese youths (HECY) and explores whether family factors work as distal factors in the revised framework of the theory of planned behavior. Convenience sampling and snow-ball sampling have been utilized to select participants from highly-educated Chinese youth population who are students studying in colleges or universities and people who recently graduated from Chinese colleges or universities with Bachelor's and/or Master' degrees. This study relies on quantitative methodologies to analyze the data from the participants' responses to online cross sectional surveys with SPSS. This present study has determined that family influences do contribute to the smoking behaviors of highly-educated Chinese youths. In addition to examining the proximal factors (highly-educated Chinese youths' attitudes toward smoking, self-efficacy and social norms of smoking) in the model of the theory of planned behavior, this current study has examined the following distal factors: (1) parental communication about smoking, (2) communication about smoking among siblings, (3) parents, siblings and/or cousins' attitudes toward smoking, and (4) smoking behaviors of parents, siblings and/or cousins.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014