Matching Items (8)

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Evaluating the Effect of a Multimodal Residential Program for Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder on Chronic Pain Acceptance: A Feasibility Project

Description

Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of unintentional injury related mortality in the U.S. with two people dying each day as a result of opioid overdose in Arizona. Among

Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of unintentional injury related mortality in the U.S. with two people dying each day as a result of opioid overdose in Arizona. Among patients treated for opioid use disorder, chronic pain is frequently cited as the reason for opioid use. Treatment of chronic pain with long-term use of opioids is linked to increased medication tolerance, worsened pain sensitivity, and psychological symptoms. Acceptance of chronic pain is the individual’s ability to be willing to endure pain and their ability and willingness to participate in activities despite experiencing chronic pain. Increased acceptance of chronic pain has been shown to lower pain intensity, promote recovery of individuals’ emotional and physical abilities, and lessen use of pain medication including opioids.

Purpose: The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to examine the feasibility of using acceptance of chronic pain, pain severity, and pain interference as measures to evaluate the effectiveness of a multimodal residential treatment program for opioid abuse.

Methods: Two surveys, the CPAQ and BPI were administered shortly after admission (T1) and after 21-25 days (T2) to evaluate project feasibility.

Results: Six participants were enrolled. Three participants completed T1 and T2 surveys. Three participants were lost to follow-up. Mean scores for Chronic Pain Acceptance were T1 = 79 (SD = 17.0) and T2 = 78.67 (SD = 5.0). All surveys were easy to administer and participants answered all questions.

Conclusion: Chronic pain acceptance may be a feasible and meaningful measure with which to evaluate residential treatment programs. Further research is needed to evaluate acceptance of chronic pain with long-term opioid abstinence and overdose deaths.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-01

Health Promotion Education for Overweight and Obesity in Adults with Endocrine Disorders

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement health promotion education for overweight and obese adults with endocrine disorders. The overarching goal was to change dietary intake and improve

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement health promotion education for overweight and obese adults with endocrine disorders. The overarching goal was to change dietary intake and improve exercise to reduce the incidence, prevalence, and impact of comorbidities associated with obesity.

Background/Synthesis: Obesity is a significant epidemic facing the nation today with multiple impacts on the national healthcare system. There is often an association between obesity and endocrine disorders such as type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. Both obesity and diabetes cost the nation billions of dollars annually in healthcare costs. Evidence shows that lifestyle modifications related to nutrition and physical activity are effective in weight reduction and prevention of chronic disease, especially when given by a healthcare provider.

Methods: Fifteen adult patients at an endocrinology office in Arizona received individual counseling using the teach-back method focusing on health promotion behaviors through nutrition and exercise with a two-week follow-up phone call. Short-term outcomes measured in this project included changes in dietary intake and exercise behaviors through a pre- and post-test adapted from an obesity-screening tool developed by Greenwood et al. (2008).

Outcomes/Results: Participants were primarily Caucasian and Hispanic, married, female, average age of 50 years, average BMI of 34.5, and some college education. There was a statistically significant increase in health promoting behavior on posttest scores (M=66, SD=6.23, range=58-76) compared to pretest scores (M=61, SD=4.72, range=50-66), t(14)=-2.55, p=0.023.

Conclusions and Implications: Overall, patient health promotion behaviors increased with this educational intervention. Clinical implications include a potential decrease in patient comorbidities related to overweight and obesity. Implications for the greater healthcare system include decreased comorbidities, utilization of healthcare resources, and costs associated with overweight and obesity. Future recommendations would include determining weight and BMI changes over a longer period of time for even better outcome measures.

Keywords: obesity, obese, overweight, health promotion, health education, diet, exercise, nutrition

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-06

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Effect of Social Support on Health Empowerment and Perceived Well-Being in Adults Impacted By Cancer: A Program Evaluation

Description

Background: Cancer impacts the lives of millions of patients, families and caregivers annually
leading to chronic stress, a sense of powerlessness, and decreased autonomy. Social support may improve health empowerment

Background: Cancer impacts the lives of millions of patients, families and caregivers annually
leading to chronic stress, a sense of powerlessness, and decreased autonomy. Social support may improve health empowerment and lead to increased perception of well-being.

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of social support provided by a cancer support agency on health empowerment and perceived well-being in adults impacted by cancer.

Conceptual Framework: The Health Empowerment Theory maintains that perceived wellbeing is the desired outcome; mediated by health empowerment through social support, personal growth, and purposeful participation in active goal attainment.

Methods: Twelve adults impacted by cancer agreed to complete online questionnaires at
baseline and at 12 weeks after beginning participation in social support programs provided by a cancer support agency.
Instruments included: Patient Empowerment Scale, The Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS), and The Office of National Statistics (ONS) Subjective Well-Being Questions.

Results: Four participants completed pre and post surveys. An increase was seen in
empowerment scores (pre M = 1.78, SD = 0.35 and post M = 3.05, SD = 0.42). There was no
increase in perceived well-being: SWEMWBS pre (M= 3.71, SD= 0.76), post (M= 3.57, SD=
0.65); ONS pre (M= 7.69, SD= 1.36), post (M= 6.59, SD= 1.52).

Implications: The data showed an increase in health empowerment scores after utilizing social support programs, lending support to the agency’s support strategies. It is recommended that the measures be included in surveys routinely conducted by the agency to continue to assess the impact of programming on health empowerment, and perceived well-being.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-03

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Self-Management Education and Arthritis Disability in the Underserved Latino Community

Description

Purpose:
The purpose was to implement a self-management program to decrease pain and disability and improve self-efficacy among low-income, Latino individuals diagnosed with arthritis.

Background:
All arthritis pain has the potential

Purpose:
The purpose was to implement a self-management program to decrease pain and disability and improve self-efficacy among low-income, Latino individuals diagnosed with arthritis.

Background:
All arthritis pain has the potential to impair mobility. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among American adults, with over 50 million individuals affected. The Latino population experiences a disproportionate incidence of disability attributable to arthritis compared to other populations. Evidence supports self-management education incorporating physical activity as a promising intervention for arthritis.

Methods:
The intervention included a curriculum developed by the Arthritis Association, three teaching sessions, and a pre/post-test. Anticipated outcomes included decreased pain measured by the Pain Visual Numeric, decreased report of disability measured by the Stanford HAQ, and increased self-efficacy measured by the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale. The setting was a faith-based medical clinic that services the uninsured population located within Southwest Arizona. Participants included Spanish and English speaking adults diagnosed with arthritis.

Results:
Twelve participants were consented however, only eight participants completed the entire project. Although the mean pain score decreased, indicating reduced pain, it was not statistically significant (pretest- M=5.75 SD=3.19; posttest- M=5.25 SD=2.82; z (7)=-.11, p= .92). However, there was a statistically significant increase in reports of exercise after the intervention (pretest M=.83, SD=.39; posttest- M=.43, SD=.53; z (6)=-2.0, p =.046). This was in response to an non validated question developed by the primary investigator and co-investigator of, “Do you currently exercise?”.

Conclusions:
Results include increases in reports of exercise post-intervention and decreased pain. The use of non-pharmacological interventions such as self-management to reduce pain and increase mobility in arthritic patients can help lessen the socioeconomic health disparity gaps.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-06

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Patient Portals: An Educational Project to Improve Provider Readiness

Description

Background: With the adoption of the Health Information Technology for Economical and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, came the implementation of the electronic health record (EHR) and incentivized provider

Background: With the adoption of the Health Information Technology for Economical and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, came the implementation of the electronic health record (EHR) and incentivized provider programs called Meaningful Use (MU). A goal of MU is to utilize patient portals to improve access to care. Current evidence supports patient portal use however providers are concerned about increased work load and lost revenue because of the time spent managing the portals rather than providing direct, billable patient care.

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to assess provider readiness for patient portals and provide an educational intervention to address perceived barriers.

Method: Ten providers at a large family practice clinic in the southwest United States were surveyed using The Provider Readiness Questionnaire prior to and after an educational intervention addressing common concerns.

Results: Improved response to patient portal use after the provider viewed the learning module. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to compare pre-and post-intervention responses. There was a statistically significant difference in the scores for the question “increase my workload” Pretest (M= 3.78, SD=1.201) and; Posttest (M=2.67, SD=1.225) ;(t (8) =5.547, p = .001). There was also a statistically significant difference for the question “increased provider professional satisfaction” Pretest (M=3.89, SD= .333) and Posttest (M= 4.44, SD=.527); t (8) = -2.294, p=.051).

Implications: Providing education addressing perceived barriers to portal use can assist the provider in understanding the value of the portals to improve patient outcomes and address common concerns about the impact of portal use on provider productivity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-02

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Perceived Social Support and Quality of Life Among Clients Participating in Cancer Support Services

Description

Purpose: To collect and analyze participant demographic information and explore use of instruments to measure perceived social support and quality of life at a local cancer support program. Specific objectives

Purpose: To collect and analyze participant demographic information and explore use of instruments to measure perceived social support and quality of life at a local cancer support program. Specific objectives included:

1. Gather and analyze participant demographic information and program utilization by participants for a non-profit cancer support agency.
2. Assess the extent to which those using the support programs experience perceived social support (PSS) and quality of life (QOL).
3. Assess the utility of the survey process and selected instruments to guide program planning.

Background: Obtaining the diagnosis of cancer is traumatic, but support groups assist in emotional healing among group members. There is strong evidence correlating support group participation with PSS and QOL. The Wilson and Cleary model of QOL clearly links social support and QOL and provided the conceptual framework for this project.

Methods: A survey for self-reported participant demographics, support activities, QOL scores, and PSS scores was implemented. Both online and pencil and paper surveys were available. Instruments included the Flanagan Quality of Life Scale (Cronbach’s α = .82 to .92) and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support Scale (Cronbach’s α = 0.91) and a demographic survey created for this project.

Outcomes: All but one survey was completed online (n=48). Respondents were primarily white, female, cancer free at the time of the survey, and over the age of 55. QOL and PSS scores within this sample emulated previous research of correlations between instruments and people with chronic illnesses.

Conclusion: Correlations of sample demographics and instrument scores reflected current literature; this project validates an effective and affordable means to evaluate program effectiveness. Future use of the survey is to better tailor services to meet the objectives of the agency to improve QOL for all individuals affected by cancer.

Keywords: Cancer, support group, quality of life, perceived social support

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-06

Team-Based Care in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes with Consideration for Social Determinants of Health

Description

The reactionary nature of the current healthcare delivery system in the United States has led to increased healthcare spending from acute exacerbations of chronic disease and unnecessary hospitalizations. Those who

The reactionary nature of the current healthcare delivery system in the United States has led to increased healthcare spending from acute exacerbations of chronic disease and unnecessary hospitalizations. Those who suffer from chronic diseases are particularly at risk. The dynamics of health care must include grappling with the complexities of where and how people live and attempt to manage their health and disease. Team-based care may offer a solution due to its interdisciplinary focus on proactive, preventative care delivered in outpatient primary care.

Studies examining the effects of team-based care have shown improvement in; HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, healthcare team morale, patient satisfaction rates, quality of care, and patient empowerment. In an effort to improve type 2 diabetes health outcomes and patient satisfaction a team based care project was implemented. The setting was an outpatient primary care clinic where the patients are known to have limited social resources. The healthcare team was comprised of a DNP Student, Master of Social Work Student, Clinical Pharmacist, and Primary Care Physician, who discussed patient specifics during informal meetings and referral processes.

Adult patients whose HbA1c level was greater than 6.5% were eligible to participate, 183 were identified and invited. Fourteen (14) agreed to participate and seven (7) completed the initial screening with a mean HbA1c of 9.7%. Significant social needs were identified using the Health Leads Questionnaire. The diabetes and social needs were addressed by members of the team who met individually with patients monthly over the course of three months. Of those who completed the initial evaluation only two (2) returned for a follow-up and had a repeat HbA1c. Both participants had important improvements in their A1C with a decrease of 2.3%, and 3.4%. The others were lost to follow up for unknown reasons. Despite the small numbers of participants this project suggests that patients can benefit when an interdisciplinary team addresses their needs and this could improve health outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-02

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The Effect of Web-based Education on First and Second Dose HPV Administration Rates and Provider Intent to Vaccinate

Description

Objectives: To assess whether a web-based video education addressing barriers to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine will increase first and second dose administration rates and health care provider intent to

Objectives: To assess whether a web-based video education addressing barriers to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine will increase first and second dose administration rates and health care provider intent to vaccinate.

Study Design: Ten health care providers from Vaccines for Children (VFC) clinics in New Mexico were included in this pretest/posttest study. Providers were given a questionnaire adapted from the Determinants of Intent to Vaccinate (DIVA) questionnaire. Only two subscales were utilized for this project (total of 10 items): Adaptation to the Patient’s Profile and General Practitioner’s Commitment to the Vaccine Approach. Martinez et al. (2016) suggest that PCP’s commitment to the vaccination approach” can be used as a stand-alone tool with a Cronbach’s alpha > .70. Following the pretest, which served as consent, providers viewed a short, four video series addressing common barriers to the HPV vaccine, followed by the same questionnaire. First and second dose rates of the HPV vaccine were measured prior to the intervention and three months post intervention using the New Mexico Immunization Information System (NMSIIS).

Results: A Wilcoxon Ranks test was used for statistical analysis of the survey responses. Alpha was set at ≤ .10. Four of the 10 questions were statistically significant for increasing provider intent to vaccinate. HPV first dose rates increased in all three clinics and second dose rates increased in two out of the three clinics.

Conclusions: Web-based education is a successful intervention for increasing
provider intent to vaccinate and first and second dose HPV administration rates. Not only can the intervention be used for the HPV vaccine, but to help increase administration rates of all other vaccines.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-02