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Design and development of an immersive virtual reality team trainer for advance cardiac life support

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Technology in the modern day has ensured that learning of skills and behavior may be both widely disseminated and cheaply available. An example of this is the concept of virtual reality (VR) training. Virtual Reality training ensures that learning can

Technology in the modern day has ensured that learning of skills and behavior may be both widely disseminated and cheaply available. An example of this is the concept of virtual reality (VR) training. Virtual Reality training ensures that learning can be provided often, in a safe simulated setting, and it may be delivered in a manner that makes it engaging while negating the need to purchase special equipment. This thesis presents a case study in the form of a time critical, team based medical scenario known as Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). A framework and methodology associated with the design of a VR trainer for ACLS is detailed. In addition, in order to potentially provide an engaging experience, the simulator was designed to incorporate immersive elements and a multimodal interface (haptic, visual, and auditory). A study was conducted to test two primary hypotheses namely: a meaningful transfer of skill is achieved from virtual reality training to real world mock codes and the presence of immersive components in virtual reality leads to an increase in the performance gained. The participant pool consisted of 54 clinicians divided into 9 teams of 6 members each. The teams were categorized into three treatment groups: immersive VR (3 teams), minimally immersive VR (3 teams), and control (3 teams). The study was conducted in 4 phases from a real world mock code pretest to assess baselines to a 30 minute VR training session culminating in a final mock code to assess the performance change from the baseline. The minimally immersive team was treated as control for the immersive components. The teams were graded, in both VR and mock code sessions, using the evaluation metric used in real world mock codes. The study revealed that the immersive VR groups saw greater performance gain from pretest to posttest than the minimally immersive and control groups in case of the VFib/VTach scenario (~20% to ~5%). Also the immersive VR groups had a greater performance gain than the minimally immersive groups from the first to the final session of VFib/VTach (29% to -13%) and PEA (27% to 15%).

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Date Created
2012

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Utilization of automated location tracking for clinical workflow analytics and visualization

Description

The analysis of clinical workflow offers many challenges to clinical stakeholders and researchers, especially in environments characterized by dynamic and concurrent processes. Workflow analysis in such environments is essential for monitoring performance and finding bottlenecks and sources of error. Clinical

The analysis of clinical workflow offers many challenges to clinical stakeholders and researchers, especially in environments characterized by dynamic and concurrent processes. Workflow analysis in such environments is essential for monitoring performance and finding bottlenecks and sources of error. Clinical workflow analysis has been enhanced with the inclusion of modern technologies. One such intervention is automated location tracking which is a system that detects the movement of clinicians and equipment. Utilizing the data produced from automated location tracking technologies can lead to the development of novel workflow analytics that can be used to complement more traditional approaches such as ethnography and grounded-theory based qualitative methods. The goals of this research are to: (i) develop a series of analytic techniques to derive deeper workflow-related insight in an emergency department setting, (ii) overlay data from disparate sources (quantitative and qualitative) to develop strategies that facilitate workflow redesign, and (iii) incorporate visual analytics methods to improve the targeted visual feedback received by providers based on the findings. The overarching purpose is to create a framework to demonstrate the utility of automated location tracking data used in conjunction with clinical data like EHR logs and its vital role in the future of clinical workflow analysis/analytics. This document is categorized based on two primary aims of the research. The first aim deals with the use of automated location tracking data to develop a novel methodological/exploratory framework for clinical workflow. The second aim is to overlay the quantitative data generated from the previous aim on data from qualitative observation and shadowing studies (mixed methods) to develop a deeper view of clinical workflow that can be used to facilitate workflow redesign. The final sections of the document speculate on the direction of this work where the potential of this research in the creation of fully integrated clinical environments i.e. environments with state-of-the-art location tracking and other data collection mechanisms, is discussed. The main purpose of this research is to demonstrate ways by which clinical processes can be continuously monitored allowing for proactive adaptations in the face of technological and process changes to minimize any negative impact on the quality of patient care and provider satisfaction.

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Date Created
2018