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A Multimedia Approach in Asthma Medication Education

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In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education comic book. Of the two creations, the asthma-education video was used in a former Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) student’s study to supplement a session at a clinic with an asthma educator. The tools included in the study, the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014) and the Asthma Control TestTM (ACTTM; QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), were completed by the participants prior to and after the implementation of the session that incorporated the video. The results suggested that the video had an effect on asthma control as measured by the ACTTM (QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), but not on daily preventative asthma inhaler usage as measured by the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014). The comic book has not been evaluated yet. Both multimedia education tools—the comic book and the video—were created as a requirement for the Barrett thesis.

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  • 2015-05

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Using a Longitudinal Case Study to Teach Warfarin Concepts to Prelicensure and Postbaccalaureate Nursing Students: A Peer Evaluation

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate nursing students' knowledge and perceived knowledge about warfarin. The study was a descriptive design that used a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in two pharmacology courses. All participating students answered warfarin case-study questions and completed a self-demographic questionnaire, a knowledge pretest and posttest, and a self-efficacy questionnaire after the activity, which evaluated students' knowledge and perceived knowledge on 11 warfarin concepts. For all students (N = 89), the number of correct answers improved significantly between pretests and posttests for Items 2-11 (p < .0001; Wilcoxon signed-rank tests), which evaluated students' knowledge on warfarin's site of action, associated laboratory values, use of vitamin K, and food-drug interactions. However, no significant difference was seen in the number of correct answers for warfarin's mechanism of action. Comparing prelicensure and postbaccalaureate groups by Mann-Whitney tests, no significant difference was seen for pretest total scores (median 7.00, n = 55; median 7.50, n = 34; respectively; p = .399). Similarly, no difference was seen for posttest total scores by groups (prelicensure: median = 9.00, n =54; postbaccalaureate: median = 10.00, n = 32; p = .344). Overall, students in both groups agreed that they could identify and explain all 11 warfarin concepts. The Pearson correlation between the total posttest and total self-efficacy scores for the combined group was .338 (p = .003), demonstrating a low but significant correlation between students' posttest total scores and their perceived warfarin knowledge, as evaluated by the self-efficacy questionnaire.

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  • 2014-12