Matching Items (8)

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Constructed Language: Feral Goblins

Description

This is a constructed language made for fictional creatures that will be featured in a novel. The creatures are feral goblins, and they are based on Irish mythology. The novel

This is a constructed language made for fictional creatures that will be featured in a novel. The creatures are feral goblins, and they are based on Irish mythology. The novel that the goblins and the language will be featured in is titled MaddConn, and it was written by Jon Bendera. It is an urban fantasy novel. The goblins have a language in the novel because there are a number of goblin characters throughout the story. One of the main characters, Maddi, has to survive amongst the feral goblins for a portion of the novel while another main character, Connor, works his way to her. She has multiple close encounters with them, and also has to find her way around their territory, so she comes into contact with the language many times. Although the language in the story was created to have developed prior to humanity, this constructed language was made to look somewhat similar to human language. As it will be involved in fiction that will be read by humans, it needs to be easily understood by humans. The language reveals features of the goblin culture and anatomy. For instance, it can be seen in the language that their shallow, wide mouths and thin lips influence their phonology. Their physiology influences much of their language. Likewise, they have three fingers on each hand, which influences their number system. As the goblins and their language developed before humans and because they are not human creatures, the typology and word order do not follow all of the correlations found in human languages. All in all, the lexicon includes many words that have to do with three of their favorite things: violence, food, and work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Dieva: A Constructed Language

Description

What is it like to create your own language? This creative project is an amalgamation of several paper, visual, and online media and is divided into two sections. The first

What is it like to create your own language? This creative project is an amalgamation of several paper, visual, and online media and is divided into two sections. The first section is the creation of an original fantasy constructed language ("conlang") called Dieva, including setting and background, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, language rules, an alphabet and writing system, and vocabulary. The second section is an exercise in applied linguistics, wherein the conlang was shared with the public via media including an online Wikia.com webpage; figures including charts and a map; the development of classroom materials for a hypothetical Dieva language class such as introduction worksheets, practice worksheets, and quizzes on the alphabet and numbers; and a "linguistic challenge" logic puzzle. All materials were then shared with volunteers who gave feedback from a myriad of teaching and non-teaching as well as linguist and non-linguist points of view. Volunteers also attempted to take the quizzes and to solve the "linguistic challenge," and their feedback was integrated into the final versions of the language, worksheets, online webpages, and other work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Disaster Linguistics: An Exploration of the Potency of Cataclysmic Event on Languages

Description

It is no great secret that languages come into contact with each other. From people interacting on the street, to children in school, to nations working on international policies, days

It is no great secret that languages come into contact with each other. From people interacting on the street, to children in school, to nations working on international policies, days do not pass where languages do not collide. And, while this is a well-documented and studied phenomenon with many books devoted to it, it is one that is incomplete. Throughout the course of time, natural and social disasters have impacted language in an unrelentless and undocumented way. The question, therefore, becomes: what happens to the languages of the people who are affected by some sort of disaster? It is well known that there are many factors that affect a language's life and development. However, what about the events like a massive volcanic eruption or the destruction of a population due to genocide? It makes sense to theorize that natural and social disasters could have lasting effects on the languages of the world. As language is one of the most important aspects of human societies, it is crucial to be able to explore and possibly understand any potential patterns of change that are stimulated from different types of devastating events. The disasters that a society undergoes directly alter the language of that people. By studying the patterns of these changes and using integral examples, the key factors of change can be identified and an evaluative system can be developed. By first giving an in-depth overview of the relevant field, Contact Linguistics, understanding the current methods for analyzing language change, and then assessing these for their usefulness in disaster cases, this paper aims to arrive at a new, integrated method for evaluation of these unique situations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Sáɱanib Inai Kat Jar̃ojunx: Grammar of the Arojun Language

Description

This grammar describes the inner workings of the language of the Fwonnel Peninsula, known in its English translations as Fwonnel, Arojaunzan, or, most succinctly, Arojun. Contained within this 288-page paper

This grammar describes the inner workings of the language of the Fwonnel Peninsula, known in its English translations as Fwonnel, Arojaunzan, or, most succinctly, Arojun. Contained within this 288-page paper are sections dedicated to Phonology, Phonetics, Morphology, Syntax, Example Texts, and various other elements of the world that I have created. Arojun is a moderately analytic language that features a Verb-Object-Subject word order, a pronoun-tense auxiliary system, and two orthography systems with historic significance. Connected to the language and included within this paper are sections on original Calendar Systems, Music Theory and Notation, Naming Traditions, Geography of the Fwonnel Peninsula, Religions, Two Dictionaries, a collection of common phrases important to learning the language and interacting with the people, and an in-depth look at the full political and linguistic history of the Fwonnel Peninsula. The Sample Text section includes several lines of interlinear glosses translating popular scenes from television shows from English(or Japanese) into Arojun, videos of which were posted to my YouTube Channel, Agma Schwa, over the course of the past year. This language, and in essence, the entirety of the fictional nation of El Fwonk Casanosia, has been building up to this point since 2007, when I was only seven years old. I may have needed to occasionally bend over backwards to make the less logical, yet emotionally significant, parts of this language and history reach a point of satisfactory suspension of disbelief, but I believe that it turned out wonderfully. Either way, this project took a great deal of effort, by far the largest project that I have worked on in my life.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Individual Differences in Simulating Language: Do Good Readers Embody More or Less?

Description

Do good readers embody more or less? The current investigation examined embodiment effects as a function of individual reading skill in the context of two cognitive theories of reading comprehension.

Do good readers embody more or less? The current investigation examined embodiment effects as a function of individual reading skill in the context of two cognitive theories of reading comprehension. The Construction-Integration model predicts that sensorimotor activity during reading will correlate negatively with reading skill, because good readers focus on relations among abstract ideas derived from the text. Supposedly those abstract ideas have little or no sensorimotor content, hence any sensorimotor activity while reading is wasted effort. In contrast, the simulation theory predicts that sensorimotor activity will correlate positively with reading skill, because good readers create a simulation of what is happening within the text to comprehend it. The simulation is based in neural and bodily systems of action, perception, and emotion. These opposing predictions were tested using the reading-by-rotation paradigm to measure embodiment effects. Those effects were then correlated with reading skill measured using the Gates-McGinite standardized reading test. Analyses revealed an unexpected interaction between condition and congruency, and a negative relationship between embodiment and reading skill. Several caveats to the results are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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A Linguistic Comparison of English and Bahasa Indonesia: Examining Language Transfer Effects

Description

This thesis compares significant linguistic features of English and Bahasa Indonesia (BI) and examines possible effects of language transfer for Indonesians who speak English as a second language (L2). The

This thesis compares significant linguistic features of English and Bahasa Indonesia (BI) and examines possible effects of language transfer for Indonesians who speak English as a second language (L2). The thesis first presents a description of BI: 1) phonology (vowels, consonants, stress and intonation), 2) word order (SVO and other alternatives, relativization, nominalization, topicalization, questions), 3) the noun phrase (derivation of nouns, modifiers in noun phrases, demonstratives, plurals, personal pronouns), and 4) the verbal system (derivation of verbs, agreement, copulas, passive voice, negation, tense, adverbs, modals/auxiliaries). For the IRB-approved research study, the researcher interviewed ten Indonesians from diverse linguistic, cultural, and educational backgrounds about their experiences learning English and asked them to tell a story in order to elicit use of the past tense. The research sought to determine which errors Indonesian L2 speakers of English often make and which of these errors can be attributed to language transfer. Also, the study examined whether participants seem to be aware of their errors and what pedagogical implications may arise from these findings. Interviews were transcribed, then errors were coded and analyzed to see if the errors that Indonesians often make while speaking English correspond with the main differences between English and BI. The most common error was verb tense. After that, the next most common errors were articles; plurals; prepositions; other verbs; omission of "be" verbs; adjectives; omission of subjects; subject/verb agreement; and languages
ationalities. The thesis also discusses participants' perceptions of differences between BI and English and perceptions of difficulties when learning English, and how these perceptions correspond with their performance in English. While it seems that many of the errors that Indonesian L2 speakers of English are due to language transfer, others are not. Virtually no research has been carried out on language transfer from BI to English, so there is much future research that can be conducted on Indonesians learning English. Language transfer is just one of the relevant topics in the field.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Language of Revim: A Constructed Language

Description

This is a constructed language that is primarily based on getting rid of Morphological and Syntactical ambiguity. Much of the inspiration I took when making this language came from Latin

This is a constructed language that is primarily based on getting rid of Morphological and Syntactical ambiguity. Much of the inspiration I took when making this language came from Latin and Ancient Greek, adopting the things that make those languages beautiful, and changing the things that make them difficult. The main thing I wanted this language to accomplish was to achieve maximum specificity, clarity, and complexity of thought, and therefore I focused heavily on clause formation and making this a highly synthetic language.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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To or Be or Not To Be: The Role of Syntactic Movement in Distinguishing Chinese Prepositions and Verbs

Description

For typological and historical reasons, the category of prepositions in Modern Chinese
has been long debated in terms of its distribution, its classification, and even its very existence. This paper

For typological and historical reasons, the category of prepositions in Modern Chinese
has been long debated in terms of its distribution, its classification, and even its very existence. This paper defends the existence of a prepositional category in Chinese as well as offers means to identify the category and distinguish prepositions from verbs by analyzing their distribution and syntactic capabilities. The research for this paper is based on existing literature on Chinese prepositions, Chinese syntax, and linguistic theories as well as on corpus analysis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05