Matching Items (7)

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The Neuropsychological Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

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Past studies have shown that exercise in the form of high intensity interval training (HIIT) is the "ideal form of exercise to improve health and performance without overstressing the immune

Past studies have shown that exercise in the form of high intensity interval training (HIIT) is the "ideal form of exercise to improve health and performance without overstressing the immune system" (Fisher et. al, 2011, p. 5). Additionally, HIIT has been found to promote cardiovascular health and immunity (Fisher et. al, 2011). The proposed study will evaluate the neuropsychological effects of HIIT on breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy. The intervention group (n = 17) will receive a HIIT protocol concurrent with chemotherapy treatment. There will also be a control group (n= 17) to compare the effects of the intervention. Breast cancer survivorship is often ridden with various health and mental problems, the implementation of HIIT procedures could help to reduce these issues. It is expected that knowledge from this study will be useful in the healthcare setting to benefit breast cancer patients. This study will uniquely add to the limited research base by introducing an intervention for neuropsychological declines in breast cancer patients.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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International Student-American Counselor Dyadic Relationships

Description

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international students reached 1.18 million as of May 2017 (Smith, 2017). Whereas both first year international and domestic students experience difficulties associated with their status as university students, international students appear to be more vulnerable to experience psychological distress, as compared to their domestic peers (Edmond, 1997). Research has shown, that international students report higher levels of stress related to social difficulty as opposed to domestic students (Edmond, 1997). Given these patterns, it is not surprising that international students entering U.S. universities may be more likely to seek and receive counseling services than before. A study conducted with students, both international and domestic, compared trends from 2004 to 2006 of students utilizing counseling services; results revealed a 10 percent increase in international students' utilization of counseling services. (Cheng, Mallinckrodt, Soet, & Sevig, 2010). Such increase in the number of international students seeking counseling services appears to necessitate current and future practitioners to be well-equipped to work with this unique and diverse client population of international students. The goal of this study is to explore the experience of two current day American counselors working with international students using grounded theory of analysis to analyze the transcriptions of semi-structured interviews and to ultimately inform current and future practice in the treatment of international students undergoing counseling

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Substance Use and Stress: A look at the relationship between the use of substances and stressors before and after the outbreak of COVID-19

Description

This study explores the relationship between the use of different substances and different kinds of stress from before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. The substances looked at were: alcohol, marijuana,

This study explores the relationship between the use of different substances and different kinds of stress from before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. The substances looked at were: alcohol, marijuana, caffeine, vape or nicotine use, and the use of prescription pills that were not prescribed to the user. The different kinds of stress that were examined were: academic, social, financial, and stress caused by the outbreak of COVID-19.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Understanding and predicting activist intentions: an extension of the theory of planned behavior

Description

Despite the societal importance of activism, the understanding of activist intentions remained limited (Liebert, Leve, & Hu, 2011; Klar & Kasser, 2009). The current study used the Theory of

Despite the societal importance of activism, the understanding of activist intentions remained limited (Liebert, Leve, & Hu, 2011; Klar & Kasser, 2009). The current study used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine two structural models of low-risk activist intentions and high-risk activist intentions (Ajzen, 1991). The traditional TPB model was tested against a hybrid commitment model that also assessed past activist behaviors and activist identity. Participants (N = 383) were recruited through social media, professional list-serves, and word of mouth. Results indicated a good model fit for both the traditional TPB model (CFI = .98; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .03; χ2(120) = 3760.62, p < .01) and the commitment model (CFI = .97; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .04; χ2(325) = 7848.07, p < .01). The commitment model accounted for notably more variance in both low-risk activist intentions (78.9% in comparison to 26.5% for the traditional TPB model) and high-risk activist intentions (58.9% in comparison to 11.2% for the traditional TPB model). Despite this, the traditional TPB model was deemed the better model as the higher variance explained in the commitment model was almost entirely due to the inclusion of past low-risk activist behaviors and past high-risk activist behaviors. A post-hoc analysis that incorporated sexual orientation and religious affiliation as covariates into the traditional model also led to a good-fitting model (CFI = .98; RMSEA = .04; SRMR = .04; χ2(127) = 217.18, p < .01) and accounted for increased variance in low-risk activist intentions (29.7%) and high-risk activist intentions (18.7%) compared to the traditional model. The merits of each of the structural models and the practical implications for practice and research were discussed

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Role of Multiracial Resiliency on the Multiracial Risks - Psychological Adjustment Link Among Multiracial Adults

Description

A growing body of research indicates that people of multiple racial lineages in the US encounter challenges to positive psychological adjustment because of their racial status. In response, they also

A growing body of research indicates that people of multiple racial lineages in the US encounter challenges to positive psychological adjustment because of their racial status. In response, they also exhibit unique resilience strategies to combat these challenges. In this study, the moderating roles of previously identified multiracial resilient factors (i.e., shifting expressions, creating third space, and multiracial pride) were examined in the associations between unique multiracial risk factors (i.e., multiracial discrimination, perceived racial ambiguity, and lack of family acceptance) and psychological adjustment (i.e., satisfaction with life, social connectedness, and distress symptoms) of multiracial adults. Drawing on risk and resilience theory, results first indicated that the multiracial risk factors (i.e., multiracial discrimination, perceived racial ambiguity, and lack of family acceptance) relate negatively with social connectedness and distress symptoms, but did not significantly relate with satisfaction with life. Additionally, a differential moderating effect for one multiracial resilient factor was found, such that the protective or exacerbative role of creating third space depends on the psychological outcome. Specifically, results suggest creating third space buffers (e.g., weakens) the association between multiracial discrimination and satisfaction with life as well as lack of family acceptance and satisfaction with life among multiracial adults. Results further suggest creating third space exacerbates (e.g., strengthens) the negative association between perceived racial ambiguity on social connectedness and distress symptoms as well as lack of family acceptance on social connectedness and distress symptoms. Moreover, no two-way interaction effects were found for either of the other multiracial resilient factors (i.e., shifting expressions and multiracial pride). This study highlights the complex nature of racial identity for multiracial people, and the nuanced risk and resilience landscape encountered in the US.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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The Masculine Overcompensation Theory: A Gender Perspective on Teacher Reactions to Transgender Bullying

Description

Teachers represent important agents of gender socialization in schools and play a critical role in the lived experiences of transgender students. What remains less clear, however, is whether the gender

Teachers represent important agents of gender socialization in schools and play a critical role in the lived experiences of transgender students. What remains less clear, however, is whether the gender of the teacher impacts their response to transgender bullying and specifically how threats to gender identity might influence men who teach to respond negatively. The current study used a 2 (gender) x 3 (gender identity threat, no gender identity threat, and control) experimental design to assess whether the masculine overcompensation theory helps explain how men who teach respond to transgender victimization experiences. It was hypothesized that men in the gender identity threat condition would endorse more anti-trans attitudes (e.g., higher transphobic attitudes, lower allophilia [feelings of liking] toward transgender individuals, more traditional gender roles, less supportive responses to a vignette about transgender bullying, less support for school practices that support transgender students, and less likelihood of signing a petition supporting transgender youth rights) compared to the other conditions. It was also expected that they would endorse more negative affect but higher feelings of self-assurance. Women in the study served as a comparison group as no overcompensation effect is expected for them. Participants (N = 301) were nationally recruited through word of mouth, social media, and personal networks. Results from the current study did not support the theory of masculine overcompensation as there was no effect of threatening feedback. There were a number of significant gender differences. Men reported lower transgender allophilia, higher transphobia, more traditional gender role beliefs, less likelihood of signing the petition supporting transgender youth rights, and more self-assurance than women. No gender effect was found for negative affect or support for school practices supporting transgender students. There were also no observable differences in participant responses to the vignette by gender or condition. The implications and limitations of the current study were discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Heterosexist Discrimination, Sexual Identity, and Conflicts in Allegiances among Latinx Sexual Minority Adults

Description

Empirical research has supported that higher behavioral engagement with and higher affective pride toward the LGBTQ+ community are associated with greater psychological well-being among Latinx sexual minorities (e.g., lesbian, gay,

Empirical research has supported that higher behavioral engagement with and higher affective pride toward the LGBTQ+ community are associated with greater psychological well-being among Latinx sexual minorities (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, etc.). Less is known, however, about predictors of sexual identity development among Latinx sexual minorities. This study explores how heterosexist discrimination may be related to the exploration and affirmation of one’s sexual minority identity. Conversely, conflicts in allegiance (CIA), that is, the experience of perceived incompatibility Latinx sexual minorities may experience between their racial-ethnic and sexual minority identities, was examined as a potential negative correlate. This study applies a rejection-identification model and identity development theories to test the associations between heterosexist discrimination, conflicts in allegiances and sexual identity constructs (LGBTQ+ behavioral engagement and affective pride). Among a sample of 366 Latinx sexual minorities, this study found both heterosexist discrimination and conflicts in allegiances were significant predictors of LGBTQ+ behavioral engagement and affective pride. Additionally, data supported two mediational models that tested relations between heterosexist discrimination, LGBTQ+ behavioral engagement, and affective pride. This study contributes to our understanding of sexual minority identity among Latinx individuals. These findings can assist helping professionals and community centers in promoting psychological well-being among Latinx sexual minority individuals by informing identity-affirming practices and interventions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018