Matching Items (4)

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Structure and Facilitation in Clinical Supervision when Clients Present with Varying Levels of Suicidal Risk

Description

In this study, I investigated supervisory practices (i.e., structure and facilitation) when training therapists of differing levels of experience and self-efficacy are working with clients presenting with varying levels of

In this study, I investigated supervisory practices (i.e., structure and facilitation) when training therapists of differing levels of experience and self-efficacy are working with clients presenting with varying levels of suicidal risk (i.e., low or high). While previous research has supported that trainees need and want less structure and direction from their supervisors and become more self-efficacious as they gain more experience, this same assumption may not hold for crisis situations, such as when clients present with suicidal risk. To examine how trainees rate the quality of clinical supervision when working with clients presented with varying levels of suicidal risk, and how this may vary according to trainee experience level and trainee self-efficacy, an experimental design was used in which trainees read vignettes of pretend clients and supervisory sessions. It was hypothesized that quality ratings of supervision and client risk level, trainee experience level, and trainee self-efficacy would be moderated by the type of supervisory practice received. Results found significant main effects for trainee experience level, client risk level, and type of supervision received on supervision quality ratings, but no significant moderations. Clinical implications for supervisory practices and future directions for research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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The role of future time perspective: an examination of a structural model

Description

The present study of two hundred and seven university students examined the structural relation of future-orientation (both valence and instrumentality), career decision-making self-efficacy and career indecision (choice/commitment anxiety and lack

The present study of two hundred and seven university students examined the structural relation of future-orientation (both valence and instrumentality), career decision-making self-efficacy and career indecision (choice/commitment anxiety and lack of readiness). Structural equation modeling results indicated that while the overall proposed model fit the data well, my hypotheses were partially supported. Valence was not significantly related to career decision-making self-efficacy, choice/commitment anxiety and lack of readiness. However, instrumentality completely mediated the relation between valence and career decision-making self-efficacy, choice/commitment anxiety and lack of readiness. Instrumentality was significantly related to career decision-making self-efficacy and lack of readiness. Career decision-making self-efficacy completely mediated the relation between instrumentality and choice/commitment anxiety; however, it only partially mediated the relation between instrumentality and lack of readiness. Although the proposed model was invariant across gender, the findings indicate that women reported higher instrumentality and lower lack of readiness than did men. No differences were found for career decision-making self-efficacy and choice/commitment anxiety across gender. The findings suggest that psychologists, counselors, teachers, and career interventionists should consider the role future time perspective in university students' career development.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The unique experiences of body dissatisfaction in males: accurate assessment and outcomes

Description

The relations among internalization of the U.S. sociocultural standard of the ideal male body image, male body dissatisfaction, and behavioral and psychological outcomes of male body dissatisfaction were examined in

The relations among internalization of the U.S. sociocultural standard of the ideal male body image, male body dissatisfaction, and behavioral and psychological outcomes of male body dissatisfaction were examined in a sample of 215 ethnically diverse male college students. Concerns regarding accurate assessment of male body dissatisfaction were addressed. Structural equation modeling was utilized to identify the relations among the internalization of the sociocultural ideal male body image, male body dissatisfaction (as measured by the Male Body Attitudes Scale, MBAS; Tylka, Bergeron, & Schwartz, 2005), and behavioral and psychological outcomes. Results demonstrated that internalization of specific aspects of the ideal male body (lean and muscular) predicted corresponding components of male body dissatisfaction (lean and muscular). Further, each component of male body dissatisfaction was related to distinct behavioral and psychological outcomes. Implications for clinical practice and research were discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

Coping with dating violence as a function of violence frequency, severity, gender role beliefs and solution attribution: a structural modeling approach

Description

This study presents a structural model of coping with dating violence. The model integrates abuse frequency and solution attribution to determine a college woman's choice of coping strategy. Three hundred,

This study presents a structural model of coping with dating violence. The model integrates abuse frequency and solution attribution to determine a college woman's choice of coping strategy. Three hundred, twenty-four undergraduate women reported being targets of some physical abuse from a boyfriend and responded to questions regarding the abuse, their gender role beliefs, their solution attribution and the coping behaviors they executed. Though gender role beliefs and abuse severity were not significant predictors, solution attribution mediated between frequency of the abuse and coping. Abuse frequency had a positive effect on external solution attribution and external solution attribution had a positive effect on the level of use of active coping, utilization of social support, denial and acceptance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011