Matching Items (9)

126923-Thumbnail Image.png

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: A Psychotherapeutic Intervention in Patients with Chronic Dermatological Diseases

Description

Psychological stress plays a vital role in skin disease. The worsening and reoccurrence of signs and symptoms of a wide array of skin diseases have been linked by various studies

Psychological stress plays a vital role in skin disease. The worsening and reoccurrence of signs and symptoms of a wide array of skin diseases have been linked by various studies to stress. Together, stress and skin disease synergistically inhibit occupational, social, and emotional functioning resulting in diminished quality of life (Dixon, Witcraft, & Perry, 2019). Heightened levels of stress may contribute to an assortment of immediate and future adverse outcomes. These outcomes include triggering a skin outbreak, impairing function, behavioral avoidance, intense negative emotions such as shame and embarrassment, and emotional distress such as depression and anxiety (Dixon et al., 2019).

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship of stress, anxiety, and depression to the specific chronic skin diseases of acne vulgaris, psoriasis, vitiligo, rosacea, and atopic dermatitis. It will also discuss how a psychotherapeutic intervention called mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may decrease anxiety and depression in individuals affected by chronic skin diseases. This paper will also highlight the impact of MBSR on treatment adherence to dermatological prescription medications. A pilot program conducted in a dermatology clinic evaluates the effectiveness of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention to decrease patient anxiety and depression.

Results indicate clinical significance in that participants noted reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and scores, enjoyed MBSR and would continue MBSR. The potential benefits of this pilot program may include decreased patient anxiety and depression, increased patient satisfaction, increased treatment adherence, improved patient satisfaction of intervention, and improved patient outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-25

126911-Thumbnail Image.png

Access to Healthcare Among Those Experiencing Homelessness: A Depression Screening Project

Description

Homeless individuals encounter barriers such as lack of health insurance, increased cost of care and unavailability of resources. They have increased risk of comorbid physical disease and poor mental health.

Homeless individuals encounter barriers such as lack of health insurance, increased cost of care and unavailability of resources. They have increased risk of comorbid physical disease and poor mental health. Depression is a prevalent mental health disorder in the US linked to increased risk of mortality. Literature suggests depression screening can identify high-risk individuals with using the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9).

The objective of this project is to determine if screening identifies depression in the homeless and how it impacts healthcare access. Setting is a local organization in Phoenix offering shelter to homeless individuals. An evidence-based project was implemented over two months in 2019 using convenience sampling. Intervention included depression screening using the PHQ-9, referring to primary care and tracking appointment times. IRB approval obtained from Arizona State University, privacy discussed, and consent obtained prior to data collection. Participants were assigned a random number to protect privacy.

A chart audit tool was used to obtain sociodemographics and insurance status. Descriptive statistics used and analyzed using Intellectus. Sample size was (n = 18), age (M = 35) most were White-non-Hispanic, 44% had a high school diploma and 78% were insured. Mean score was 7.72, three were previously diagnosed and not referred. Three were referred with a turnaround appointment time of one, two and seven days respectively. No significant correlation found between age and depression severity. A significant correlation found between previous diagnosis and depression severity. Attention to PHQ-9 varied among providers and not always addressed. Future projects should focus on improving collaboration between this facility and providers, increasing screening and ensuring adequate follow up and treatment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-04

126915-Thumbnail Image.png

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Maternal Education

Description

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental,

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes. Children of parents who have experienced ACEs are at a higher risk of experiencing ACEs themselves, creating an intergenerational cycle of trauma between parents and their children. Evidence suggests that parenting education can reduce the impact of ACEs and potentially eliminate poor health outcomes. The literature revealed that parenting education was found to increase parenting competency, which will in turn reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

The purpose of this evidence-based project is to evaluate parenting competency and parenting self-efficacy after implementing six parenting workshops. The workshop topics consist of: (a) stress management, (b) understanding trauma, (c) positive parenting, (d) positive discipline, (e) play, and (f) learning development and support. The workshops were delivered at a community residential facility for women seeking recovery from abuse, incarceration, chemical dependency and other life-controlling problems. Participants included 10 female residents.

Demographics, ACE scores, pre and post Parenting Sense of Competency Scale, and a post intervention satisfaction questionnaire and discussion were used to collect data from the participants. Mothers’ ACE scores ranged from 2-9. The parenting self-efficacy score increased in the subgroup that attended all six workshops. All of the mothers agreed that the workshops would help with parenting their children. The findings suggest that parenting education increases parenting knowledge and self-efficacy, and may reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-04

515-Thumbnail Image.png

A culturally competent behavioral weight loss program for adult Latinos with a BMI >30kg/m2

Description

This study answers the question, “In Adult Hispanic BMI ≥ 30 (P), how does development of a weight loss program that utilizes Motivational Interviewing (I) compared to counseling and educational

This study answers the question, “In Adult Hispanic BMI ≥ 30 (P), how does development of a weight loss program that utilizes Motivational Interviewing (I) compared to counseling and educational materials only (C) affect weight loss over the period of three months (T).” There are limited published systematic reviews and randomized control trials to evaluate the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI), in conjunction with diet and exercise to promote weight loss. Participants (n = 5) were Latino patients of a local community health care center who were overweight and medically at risk due to unhealthy lifestyles that were determined through a screening test.

The 4-week clinical pathway program used motivational interviewing in one-on-one sessions every other week, and implemented the “Your Heart, Your Life” curriculum the other weeks. One expected outcome included lower anthropometric measurement numbers of participants’ WL, BMI, WC, and BP. Another expected outcome was an increase in physical activity. Participants were also expected to earn a higher score on a post-test about nutrition and healthy living. A paired t-test and power analyses were used to assess its effectiveness.

Results indicated significant decrease in weight loss (t [5] = 3.68, p = .0211, Cohen’s dz=1.647). For heart healthy habits, there were significant increases all three categories: weight management (t [5] = - 3.36, p = .0211), cholesterol and fat (t [5] = - 3.138, p =.035, salt and sodium (t [5] = - 4.899, p = .008). In addition, there was an increase in knowledge (t [5] = - 4.000, p = .016). Every participant showed small gains. Future implications should include more participants, including males, a control group, innovative activities that help to motivate a community of learners and more flexibility in allotted time for interventions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-06

561-Thumbnail Image.png

Implementation of a Culturally-Tailored Diabetes Education Program in a Medically-Underserved Community Health Clinic

Description

Purpose: Hispanics diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have poorer health outcomes than non-Hispanic whites. Approximately one- half of all Hispanic DM patients utilize community health clinics for their

Purpose: Hispanics diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have poorer health outcomes than non-Hispanic whites. Approximately one- half of all Hispanic DM patients utilize community health clinics for their DM needs. Evidence suggests that using a culturally-tailored approach to DM education can uniquely improve health outcomes in this population. The purpose of this evidence-based practice (EBP) project was to improve glycemic control in a medically underserved Hispanic community through a culturally-tailored DM education program.

Methods: This quasi-experimental pre/post design project was guided by the ACE Star Model and Leininger’s Theory of Cultural Care. The affiliated University’s IRB approved this project. The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) was implemented in a free, community clinic in a medically underserved area. Spanish speaking patients (n = 15) with A1C levels
> 8mg/dl were recruited to participate in a 6-week group educational program facilitated by community health workers. Outcomes included A1C levels, weight, and two surveys from the Michigan Diabetes Research Center - DM knowledge test and the DM empowerment scale.

Results: Paired sample t-tests were used to analyze the outcomes. The participants had an average pre-A1C of 8.82 mg/dl with post-A1C of 8.01 mg/dl (p = .028). Pre-knowledge test scores averaged 9.40 with post-test average of 12.07 (p < .001). Empowerment scores increased from 4.09 to 4.63 (p = .001). The reduction between the average pre-and post-weight measures were not statistically significant (p = .681).

Discussion: The implementation of a culturally-tailored DM educational program in a medically underserved community had a significant impact on reducing A1C levels, improving DM knowledge, and enhancing empowerment levels. Although the sample size was small and limited to one clinic, applying these programs can have a measurable clinical impact in the treatment of Hispanic DM patients. Future research can further exam how to duplicate this project on a larger scale and over a sustained period.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-23

584-Thumbnail Image.png

Introduction of a Medical Patient Portal to the Uninsured Patient

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to improve participation by increasing registration on to a medical patient portal to an uninsured population. Medical patient portals have the

Purpose: The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to improve participation by increasing registration on to a medical patient portal to an uninsured population. Medical patient portals have the potential to provide patients with timely, transparent access to health care information and engage them in their health care process and management. This may result in improved disease management outcomes.

Methods: This project was guided by a The Rosswurm and Larrabee Model for Change to Evidence- Based Practice and Pender’s health promotion framework. IRB Approved by ASU. The instruction was implemented at an urban clinic in downtown phoenix that serves uninsured and underserved individuals. Uninsured participants were recruited (n=50). A survey pre and post registration was conducted to assess knowledge and medical portal participation in addition a random pre and post chart review was performed.

Results: Descriptive statistics was used to describe sample and outcome variables. A chi-square test of independence was calculated comparing pre and post intervention significant change was found (χ2 (1) = .002, P<0.05.), a paired sample t test was calculated to compare knowledge pre and post registration instruction the mean pre-10.187(SD = 4.422), post mean was 16.958(SD=.856). A significant increase of knowledge was found (t (47) =-9.573, p (<.001).

Outcomes: In this population both patients and providers have seen significant benefits such as increased communication and patient participation, from the implementation of evidence based educational tools such as instruction with teach back, and the usage of brochures. Potential Implication for sustainability includes the lack of a designated individual that is bilingual to register patients, making patients aware of the existence of a medical patient portal, patient’s fear of sharing immigration status.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-03

591-Thumbnail Image.png

Open-Access Scheduling

Description

Declaration of Conflicts: This project has no conflicts of interest to declare.

Context: This project was completed at a federally qualified primary healthcare clinic in Phoenix, Arizona that served patients

Declaration of Conflicts: This project has no conflicts of interest to declare.

Context: This project was completed at a federally qualified primary healthcare clinic in Phoenix, Arizona that served patients of all age groups, but primarily cared for the Hispanic population providing primary care, preventative services, family planning, two lab technicians, one promoter, two medical assistant supervisors, five front desk staff, one chief administrative officer, one chief financial officer, two medical directoers who were also providers at the clinic.

Problem and Analysis Assessment: During my clinical rotations, I saw the burden a missed patient appointment had not only on the patients themselves, but also on the clinic, providers, and the staff. It caused delay in treatment for patients, and it did not allow other patients that wanted to be seen to be seen. It also increased unnecessary costs and wasted provider time. Thereafter, I met with some of the leadership team and one of the medical directors to determine a solution to reduce the number of missed appointments that were occurring. An educational session was kept to discuss the findings of this problem to the providers and the staff and when surveys were handed out to the patients, providers, and staff to assess their satisfaction with the old scheduling system versus the new scheduling system, they were also provided with a cover letter discussing the project.

Intervention: In order for improvements in care to occur, a system process change including the way patients are scheduled must occur. In this case, an open-access scheduling system (OAS) was implemented. OAS allows a patient to schedule an appointment on the 'same-day' or the 'next-day' to be seen. One provider at each of the clinics, each day of the week was available for 'same-day' appointments from 1300-1600. The providers were still available for scheduled appointments using the previous scheduling method. Walk-ins were still accepted, and were scheduled based on patient provider preference; however, if an appointment was not available for their preferred provider, they were typically seen with the provider that was the 'same-day' provider for that day.

Strategy for change: Since patients were only allowed to schedule appointments one month in advance, only one month was needed to implement this process change. A recommendation for the future would be to clearly identify the patient encounter type, and label it as a same-day appointment, as this would be helpful when gathering and extracting data for this type of patient group specifically.

Measurement of Improvement: Over a three-month period, a data collection plan was used to determine the number of Mas over a three-month period before and after implementation of this change. Satisfaction scores were measured using likert scales for patients, provider, and staff, and a dichotomous scale was used to determine the likelihood of emergency room or urgent care use. A comparison was done to measure revenue during the same time frame. During the three months, a clinically significant decrease in MAs was seen (<0.52%), with an increase in revenue by 41%. Additionally, a statistically significant increase in patient, provider and staff satisfaction was also noted when compared to the old scheduling system, as >68% of all patients, providers and staff reported feeling either very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the new scheduling system. Additionally, patients also reported that they were less likely to visit an emergency room(88%) or urgent care (90%) since they were able to be seen the same-day or the next-day by a provider.

Effects of changes: An incidental finding occurred during this study - where 877 more patients were seen in the three months during the implementation of this project, compared to the three months prior; which likely resulted in a 41% increase in revenue. Additionally this project, allowed patients that wanted to be seen on the same day, to be seen, and it decreased unnecessary costs associated with emergency room or urgent care visits. Some of the limitations involved included the current political environment, appointment slots that were previously 15 minutes in length (in 2016), increased to 20 minutes in length (in 2017), a language barrier was noted for the patient surveys since English was not the first language for many of the patients who completed the survey (although documents were translated), and the surveys used were not reliable instrument given that a reliable instrument in previous studies could not be found.

Lessons learnt: In order to have accuracy of the survey results, it is best for the author of the study to hand out and provide scripture for the survey so that complete data is received from the surveyors.

Messages for others: Begin by making a small process change where only one provider allows for the open-access scheduling so that the entire office is not affected by it, and if results begin to look promising then it can be expanded. Additionally, correct labeling of patients as 'same-day' is also important so that additional data can be gathered when needed regarding the 'same-day' patients.

Patient/Family/Guardian Involvement: Patients who benefited from the new scheduling system (open-access scheduling) were asked to fill out a survey that asked them to disclose some demographic data and asked them to determine their satisfaction with the new vs old scheduling system and their likelihood of visiting an emergency room or urgent care.

Ethics Approval: Arizona State University Institutional Review Board (IRB) Received: September 2017

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-02

592-Thumbnail Image.png

Opioid Management: Provider Education

Description

Over the last two decades, opioid prescription and prevalence has increased to account for over 33,000 deaths per year (Soelberg, Brown, Du Vivier, Meyer & Ramachandran, 2017). This is not

Over the last two decades, opioid prescription and prevalence has increased to account for over 33,000 deaths per year (Soelberg, Brown, Du Vivier, Meyer & Ramachandran, 2017). This is not only due to overdose, but misuse, abuse, and addiction. The abrupt increase in prescriptions, pills dispensed, and opioid-related deaths have encouraged the involvement of multiple entities.

In 2016, the opioid crisis gained the attention of communities that released guidelines to regulate prescription of opioid pain management. Such entities include the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute on Drug Abuse, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS), and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Evidence shows that prescribing practices between providers vary. It also shows that providers lack knowledge of appropriate opioid prescribing and management. To address this problem, provider education on an opioid policy is the most effective way to uniform opioid prescribing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-22

621-Thumbnail Image.png

Tai Chi for Falls Prevention: A Student-Led DNP Project

Description

Aim: To reduce the fear of falling in an elderly population by teaching ‘Tai Chi for Falls Prevention’ classes twice a week for 12 weeks.

Background & Significance: Falls continue to

Aim: To reduce the fear of falling in an elderly population by teaching ‘Tai Chi for Falls Prevention’ classes twice a week for 12 weeks.

Background & Significance: Falls continue to be the leading cause of injury-related deaths of Arizonans who are 65 years or older - well above the national average. It is predicted that by 2030, national medical spending for this population will total over $31 billion, yearly. Tai Chi is revered for being a beneficial form of simple, low-impact exercise, which the CDC endorses for its falls risk reduction benefits.

Methods: The intervention consisted of 60-minute classes occurring twice a week for 12 weeks. Participants were English-speaking, between 65-85 years old, and able to ambulate independently. Appropriate pre-screening tools were used before applicants consented. Their Fear of Falling (FoF) was measured using a fall risk perception tool at the beginning, middle, and the end of the project. This ordinal data was analyzed with Friedman ANOVA using SPSS 25

Outcomes/Results: After enrolling five total participants, only three completed the project. This severely limited data analysis of their FoF, resulting in a statistical significance (p = 0.68), deeming the intervention ineffective - Despite observable downwards trending FoF scores.

Conclusion: The acceptance of the null hypothesis is attributed to the low enrollment and high attrition rate. Also, the only data measured was quantifiable, subjective data. Future projects could add objective data to reinforce the benefits of Tai Chi. This might reinforce the validity of Tai Chi as a practical recommendation due to its cost-effective simple interventional design and effectiveness for prevention of accidental falls. Increased focus on improved recruitment & retainment strategies should be prioritized for similar projects in the future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-15