Matching Items (126)

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What's for Dinner?

Description

Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food,

Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food, and if we realize that, we can use food as a powerful tool — a conceptual tool, design tool, to shape the world differently. It triggers a new way of thinking about the problem, recognizing that food is not a commodity; it is life, it is culture, it’s us. It’s how we evolved.” If the passage of food culture is dependent upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations, the learning environments should reflect this tenability in its systematic and architectural approach.

Through an investigation of agriculture and cuisine and its consequential influence on culture, education, and design, the following project intends to reconceptualize the learning environment in order facilitate place-based practices. Challenging our cognitive dissonant relationship with food, the design proposal establishes a food identity through an imposition of urban agriculture and culinary design onto the school environment. Working in conjunction with the New American University’s mission, the design serves as a didactic medium between food, education, and architecture in designing the way we eat.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

The Storytelling House

Description

This project addresses the high demand of housing units in the Gila River Indian Community and proposes an architectural intervention with the intent of bringing tribal culture into the everyday

This project addresses the high demand of housing units in the Gila River Indian Community and proposes an architectural intervention with the intent of bringing tribal culture into the everyday context of the home. Initially, the existing condition is critiqued from an architectural and cultural lens, and establishes the current realities of the residents. An investigation of the existing condition and the surrounding context determined that the immediate contradiction to the existing house is the storytelling tradition of the Akimel O'odham and Pee Posh tribes. This project accepts and revises the existing condition and attempts to combine it with the fundamental traits of storytelling culture to create a house that encourages storytelling across generations, and serves as a space that allows residents to practice culture in the every day.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Inclusive Design and the Social Responsibilities of Interior Designers

Description

Over the last few years, we have gradually entered a period of social unrest here in the United States. For the first time in my generation, we are seeing protests

Over the last few years, we have gradually entered a period of social unrest here in the United States. For the first time in my generation, we are seeing protests fill the streets of major cities across the nation; watching nervously as tensions rise amongst nationalities, religious groups, and political parties, and becoming increasingly more concerned as many powerful countries appear to be on the brink of war. Many people sit at home terrified, feeling as though their basic rights and freedoms are in jeopardy under the current tumultuous circumstances. In times such as these, it is the ideas of hope, unity and social empathy are essential to maintaining a functional society. As these issues continue to develop around me, I began to question my role and responsibilities as a designer in the efforts to battle the growing social injustice. I began my early research on the social implications of design and found that according to the US Census report from 2015, over 62% of the United States population live in a major city, and according to a report produced by the United Nations, over 60% of the people on the entire planet are projected to live in urban areas by the year 2030. Knowing these statistics, we can no longer claim to live in a world shaped primarily by nature, but instead in a designed and constructed environment shaped by human beings. In considering this fact, it became increasingly apparent that designers have tremendous influence over the physical and social progress of our world. But design runs deeper than just physical products in our culture, extending to every service and experience we encounter throughout the day. Conversely, although everything in our world has in some way been designed, not everything has been designed well. With this thesis I will address the social implications of interior design and the extents to which the social issues of equality and accessibility are currently being addressed through design. I will introduce the topics of inclusive design and social responsibility as they relate to the profession of interior design, and begin to question how our current module of education seeks to support these ideas of social progress in regard to the growing profession. This thesis will also serve as a reflection on my recent application of this research in an attempt to influence the designers and discipline around me.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Facebook for Empathy: A Campaign to Combat Social Media's Impact on the Self-Esteem of Teenagers

Description

Adolescence, a period of life characterized by drastic physiological as well as psychological development, is undoubtedly daunting. With the rise of social media, this period has become increasingly difficult for

Adolescence, a period of life characterized by drastic physiological as well as psychological development, is undoubtedly daunting. With the rise of social media, this period has become increasingly difficult for teenagers to navigate as social media continues to transform the way they develop psychologically. By increasing their need for social validation, creating a sense of hyper-connectivity, and encouraging an unprecedented lack of empathy, social media negatively impacts self-esteem, a pillar of the social and emotional development endured by teens in these formative years. The result of this impact, low self-esteem is linked to a plethora of serious outcomes ranging from eating disorders and anxiety, to substance abuse and depression. These outcomes are the reasons why social media's effect on the self-esteem of teenagers is an issue worth addressing.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Surveillance Self-Defense Mass Surveillance and the Role of Visual Communication Design

Description

Fueled by fear in the post-9/11 United States, American intelligence agencies conduct dragnet data collection on global communication. Despite the intention of surveillance as preventative counter-terrorism action, the default search

Fueled by fear in the post-9/11 United States, American intelligence agencies conduct dragnet data collection on global communication. Despite the intention of surveillance as preventative counter-terrorism action, the default search and seizure of global communication poses a threat to our constitutional rights and individual autonomy. This is the case especially for people who may be thought of as in opposition to our current political climate, such as immigrants, people of color, women, people practicing non-western religions, people living outside of the United States, activists, persons engaging in political dissent, and people with intersecting identities. Throughout the Fall and Spring semesters, I have done research, conducted visual experiments and designed exploratory projects in order to more thoroughly identify the issue and explore the ways in which visual communication design can aid in the conversation surrounding global surveillance. It was the intention of my fourth year social issue projects to explore the role of visual communication design in the dialogue surrounding surveillance, principally focusing on the responsibility visual communication design has in spreading ideas about how to globally subvert surveillance until governments disclose information about their unconstitutional actions or until whistleblowers do it for them. My final project, the fourth year social issue exhibit, focuses on how improving our personal password habits can help us gain agency in digital spaces. Using the randomness of rolling a dice to generate entropy can help us generate stronger passwords in order to secure sensitive information online. Using design as a method of communication, my fourth year social issue exhibit shared information about how encrypted passwords can act as the first line of defense in protecting ourselves from invasive data collection and malicious internet activity.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Art of Extraction

Description

The Art of Extraction: ABSTRACT
Anthropocentric society faces a multiplicity of environmental challenges, catalyzed and perpetuated by urban-industrial culture. Many of today’s perspectives and sustainable strategies cannot accommodate the challenges’

The Art of Extraction: ABSTRACT
Anthropocentric society faces a multiplicity of environmental challenges, catalyzed and perpetuated by urban-industrial culture. Many of today’s perspectives and sustainable strategies cannot accommodate the challenges’ inherent complexity. Because urban-industrial society is only projected to grow, both in enormity and influence, the only viable option is to elucidate the complexity and employ it.
A potential setting in which to frame this exploration is the intersection of urbanism, landscape, and ecology –an overlap first introduced by the theories of Landscape Urbanism and Ecological Urbanism. Here, urbanization is not just discussed as an isolated phenomenon but one that is embedded within and responding to a variety of systems and scales. The methodologies of Landscape Urbanism and Ecological Urbanism also acknowledge artists and the visual arts as invaluable tools for realizing, communicating, and inspiring the new perspectives and modes of intervention needed to address the aforementioned urban complexity. Such artists who operate within this realm include Sissel Tolaas, Maya Lin, Katrin Sigurdardottir, David Maisel, Olafur Eliason, Mierle Ukeles, Suzanne Lacy, Steve Rowell, Mel Chin, and the Center for Land Use Interpretation. Case study analyses reveal many of these artists begin their investigations with provocative, searching questions situated within the realms of urbanism, landscape, and ecology. This is proceeded by relative scientific research and/or community involvement or outreach. Furthermore, the artists work within and extrapolate from a variety of other disciplines —increasing the scope and applicability of their work. The information they collect via this multidisciplinary approach is then metaphorically translated to the visual arts, where the public can not only physically or sensorially experience it, but understand and deduce its meaning and significance: public awareness being one of the more essential aspects of a sustainable society and at the root of our current struggle.
As a designer and architect, I will engage the artist’s mindset to explore the current and complex issue of resource extraction within Superior, Arizona: a topic at the core of urbanism, landscape, and ecology. While the town is not considered "urban" by standard definition, it and its surrounding landscapes are indirectly sculpted by the needs of urban society —rendering it the setting for this application. Within a group, we will begin with a searching question. We will conduct relative scientific research, engage the community of Superior, and call upon a variety of other disciplines to aid and inform our work. Through metaphor, the research and resulting discoveries will be artistically represented and composed within a designed exhibition of hopeful “things” (See Bruno Latour, “From Realpolitik to Dingpolitik”). This exhibition will theoretically take place on Superior’s currently dilapidated Main Street, amid a more accessible sphere. The eventual goal of the project is to illuminate and understand the complexities of resource extraction, specifically within Superior, while also enabling public awareness and empowerment through lucidity and comprehension.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Censorship As a Tool of Suppression

Description

Censorship is used as a structure to limit the ability of minority social groups to share opinions and ideologies. This in turn constricts our view of reality. My creative project

Censorship is used as a structure to limit the ability of minority social groups to share opinions and ideologies. This in turn constricts our view of reality. My creative project educates the public about the different forms censorship takes. It also provides a space for people to speak uncensored in an effort to protect their right to be heard.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Learning In Place: The Tactical Architecture of Resource Based Education

Description

In response to the modern discussion of secondary education reform, a design is proposed for a decentralized high school composed of hybridized learning centers which respond to a pedagogy of

In response to the modern discussion of secondary education reform, a design is proposed for a decentralized high school composed of hybridized learning centers which respond to a pedagogy of Resource Based Learning and appropriate the Valley Metro Light Rail Line as the site network. In pursuit of symbiotic public/private relationships, the project offers a broad avenue of access to a diverse array of students and resources. The working design ultimately visualizes a radical potential for the classroom of the 21st century.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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New Phoenix Museum of Chinese Heritage and Cultural Center

Description

Major cities in the US such as Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago have a rich cultural hub within the realm of central business district known as the Chinatown where

Major cities in the US such as Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago have a rich cultural hub within the realm of central business district known as the Chinatown where large Chinese communities reside. These districts are usually located in or around the neighborhoods where the first Chinese immigrants settled. Though Phoenix has had a Chinese community since the mid-nineteenth century, the historic and contemporary community is represented by a commercial retail center which is distant from the sites where the initial immigrants resided. Using a both textual and mapping research I explored the history of the development of Phoenix and contributions which Chinese culture made to the process. In the course of my research I learned that city of Phoenix not only had one Chinatown but two Chinatowns. My project examines the influence of Chinese culture on the urban development of Phoenix throughout history and contemporary era and reintroduces the presence of this community within the urban context of Phoenix through the creation of a cultural center. Political unrest in the Guangdong region in Southern China during the 1870s combined with both the California Gold Rush (1848 - 1850 and the construction of transcontinental railroad (1864 - 1869) led to the migration of Chinese citizens to the United States. Many of these immigrants migrated to the Valley after working at the transcontinental railroad construction near the Salt River Valley area. The first Chinese immigrants, three men and two women arrived in Phoenix I n 1872. The community remained rather small until 1879 when the transcontinental railroad construction along Salt River valley stopped due to extreme summer weather which led to the establishment of the First Chinatown in 1889. According to the old insurance Sanborn map, the first Chinatown in Phoenix was established along first and Adam street with diversified businesses such as laundries groceries, and restaurants. The Chinese community in the city was pretty small compared to other ethnic group settlements. Racial segregation was one of the major issues that caused the shift of First Chinatown from its original location to first and Madison Street and the Second Chinatown emerged in 1901. Post WWII, suburban sprawl and development of model single family detached homes were some of the reasons that led to disappearance of Chinatown in downtown Phoenix. In order to deliver this information and educate the public about the existence of Chinatown and the culture, I developed the concept of merging history and the 21st Century ideals by creating a place where Chinese culture is being reintroduced to Phoenix community. My design proposal for this issue is to construct a museum that is mainly focused upon historical Chinese Immigration to Phoenix and a cultural center that promotes Chinese culture, art, literature, merchandise, and cuisine in a way to reconnect mainland China and the city of Phoenix in 21st Century.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Adaptive and Interactive Architecture

Description

I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process

I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process of exploring the architectural potentials of computer-programmed architectural design which interact with human beings. Start with the adaptive architectural theory of Neil Leach and Sou Fujimoto's architectural theory of architecture type, I explore and test the possibilities with current tools. I did reseach on the current study and practice of adaptive and interactive architecture in 20 century. After a series of study and experiment, I decided to make the "mirror" as a portal of inside and outside a building indicating a vague spacial relationship instead of just a normal mechanic mirror. The "mirror" will able to translate the information captured from motion to another "language" presented by movable materials to surrounding people, which provides people space to reflect and interact with each other. And the device would be the prototype of my thesis. The exploration of technology in the field of architecture really attracts me. I enjoy the design process and the final product. I will pay attention to new technologies in the future and try to combine technology, art and architecture together to create new experience.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05