Matching Items (4)

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Public Library Programming for Families with Young Children: Parent Perceptions of the Fun with Math & Science Program

Description

There is a serious need for high quality early childhood programming in the state of Arizona. More than half of children under the age of six are living below the

There is a serious need for high quality early childhood programming in the state of Arizona. More than half of children under the age of six are living below the poverty line, and Arizona is ranked 47th out of 50 states and the District of Columbia in education (Tirozzi, 2014). The Scottsdale Public Library (SPL) system is fighting to combat this issue by providing free, interactive parent-child classes that are aligned with the Arizona Early Learning Standards in order to support school readiness; additionally, these programs are also aligned with the Arizona School Readiness Framework. This thesis project focuses on the Fun with Math & Science (FMS) program, one of three Knowing and Growing programs, implemented across six Scottsdale Public Library locations. This program is an extremely interactive, parent-child class that aims to improve children's basic science and math skills. The purpose of this study is to understand the population of families attending FMS at SPL, as well as parent perceptions of the programming and its impact on their family. This study also focuses on a subset of families who participated in this research at two of the give Scottsdale Public Libraries. Interviews with parents were conducted and provide insightful information about parent and child experiences participating in the program at the library.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Creating Safe Library Spaces for Children with Special Needs

Description

Equal access to community facilities and resources is vital to the educational development of children. Yet, many times community programs and activities are not appropriately adapted for children with disabilities.

Equal access to community facilities and resources is vital to the educational development of children. Yet, many times community programs and activities are not appropriately adapted for children with disabilities. This thesis project explored how public library spaces and programs can be adapted to become more accessible for children with special needs. Forty-one library youth staff members were surveyed to understand their training needs and inform the development of a professional workshop. In partnership, Arizona State University and Scottsdale Public Library System created a professional development training to educate library youth staff on cultural responsivity. One component of the training, "Creating Safe Library Spaces for Children with Special Needs," was developed to teach library youth staff about techniques for ensuring equal educational opportunities for all children in libraries. Sixteen library staff members participated in the training and were asked to complete a post-workshop survey evaluating their satisfaction and perceived usefulness of the training.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Transactional processes of parent-child interactions from early to middle childhood

Description

Theoretical models support conceptualizing parent-child relationships as reciprocal and transactional with each person exerting influence on the other’s behaviors and the overall quality and valence of the relationship across time.

Theoretical models support conceptualizing parent-child relationships as reciprocal and transactional with each person exerting influence on the other’s behaviors and the overall quality and valence of the relationship across time. The goals of this study were twofold: 1) determine whether there were reciprocal relations in maternal hostility and child negativity across early and middle childhood, and 2) investigate whether individual characteristics (i.e., child temperamental anger and frustration and maternal neuroticism) moderated relations found in goal one. Data were from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Empirical support was found for conceptualizing mother-child interactions as reciprocal. Maternal hostility was related to a decrease in the probability children would exhibit negative behaviors during mother-child interactions measured approximately two years later. Child negativity was also associated with a significant decrease in the probability mothers would display future hostility.

Child temperamental anger and frustration was found to moderate reciprocal relations across all three parent-to-child cross-lagged paths. Children scoring high on a dispositional proclivity to react with anger and frustration were more likely to avoid maternal hostility, via a significant decrease in negativity, across time. Moderation was also supported in two of three child-to-parent lagged paths. Finally, maternal neuroticism moderated the reciprocal effects during early childhood, such that more neurotic mothers were more likely to demonstrate a decrease in the probability of hostility relative to mothers scoring lower on neuroticism. This affect was attenuated in middle childhood, with patterns becoming similar between mothers scoring high and low on neuroticism. Moreover, children of less neurotic mothers were more likely to demonstrate a decrease in the probability of exhibiting negativity from 36 to 54 months compared to children of more neurotic mothers. This effect also attenuated with patterns becoming negative at the grade 1 to grade 3 lag. Overall, the results from this study supported a transactional model of parent-child relationships, were consistent with the motivation literature, did not support a coercive process of interaction when the sample and measurement paradigm were low-risk, and generally suggested parents and children have an equal influence on the relational processes investigated from early to middle childhood.

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Date Created
  • 2016

Emerging Artists I

Description

The ASU School of Dance presents Emerging Artists I February 9-12 with works by guest artists, dance faculty, and students performed at Dance Studio Theatre, PEBE 132.

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  • 2006