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Kinematics of Soccer Players During a 5-10-5 Agility Drill

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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to observe similarities and differences within soccer players during a 5-10-5 agility drill between the first and second change of direction. Overall body mechanics and center of mass position relative to the feet

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to observe similarities and differences within soccer players during a 5-10-5 agility drill between the first and second change of direction. Overall body mechanics and center of mass position relative to the feet were assessed within players. Methods: A total of 6 soccer players participated in the study. Each player ran through the 5-10-5 agility drill 10 times. All trials were video recorded and oriented to include the whole drill. Data was assessed using the program Kinovea (open-source) for 5 out of the 6 players. One player was excluded due to not meeting the inclusion criteria. The metrics assessed were total time to complete the task, the change of direction time, the time it took for the lag leg to stop moving laterally to the planting of the lead leg, and the leg angle. All tasks, except for total task time, were assessed for both the first and second change of direction. An individual analysis was performed for each player in order to obtain observational differences between the first and second change of direction for players. Results: The total task time determined the order of the players, thus the fastest player became player 1 and the slowest player 5. Players 1, 2, 4, and 5 were all found to have a statistical significance in change of direction time. When statistically significant the change of direction time was faster for the second change of direction. The slower players, player 4 and 5, had a statistically significant difference in leg angle, with the leg angle being larger for the first change of direction. Player 3 had no significant differences between any of the metrics. When looking closer at the faster players an observable difference in center of mass position relative to the feet was observed. The second change of direction showed the center of mass being positioned further anterior to the feet, and better mechanics were used to slow down and prepare to change direction. Discussion: The center of mass position relative to the feet could likely explain why the second change of direction was faster for 4 out of the 5 players. With the current information from the present study it could be adapted to help coaches instruct players to incorporate better mechanics into their change of direction tasks, and possibly improve their agility. This study could be improved by using multiple camera angles, high definition cameras, body markers, and force plates. By using these tools information could be obtained about variables that impact change of direction tasks but were not measured in the current study.

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Date Created
2020-12