Matching Items (4)

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Cannabis: Cannabinoids, Physiology, and Receptor Evolution

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The Cannabis plant has historical roots with human beings. The plant produces compounds called cannabinoids, which are responsible for the physiological affects of Cannabis and make it a research candidate

The Cannabis plant has historical roots with human beings. The plant produces compounds called cannabinoids, which are responsible for the physiological affects of Cannabis and make it a research candidate for medicinal use. Analysis of the plant and its components will help build a better database that could be used to develop a complete roster of medicinal benefits. Research regarding the cellular protein receptors that bind the cannabinoids may not only help provide reasons explaining why the Cannabis plant could be medicinally relevant, but will also help explain how the receptors originated. The receptors may have been present in organisms before the present day Cannabis plant. So why would there be receptors that bind to cannabinoids? Searching for an endocannabinoid system could help explain the purpose of the cannabinoid receptors and their current structures in humans. Using genetic technologies we are able to take a closer look into the evolutionary history of cannabinoids and the receptors that bind them.

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  • 2014-05

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Structural evolution of the McDowell Mountains, Maricopa County, Arizona

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ABSTRACT The accretion of juvenile island-arc lithosphere by convergent tectonism during the Paleoproterozoic, in conjunction with felsic volcanism, resulted in the assembly, ductile to partial brittle deformation, uplift, and northwest-directed

ABSTRACT The accretion of juvenile island-arc lithosphere by convergent tectonism during the Paleoproterozoic, in conjunction with felsic volcanism, resulted in the assembly, ductile to partial brittle deformation, uplift, and northwest-directed thrusting of rocks in the McDowell Mountains region and adjacent areas in the Mazatzal Orogenic belt. Utilizing lithologic characteristics and petrographic analysis of the Proterozoic bedrock, a correlation to the Alder series was established, revising the stratigraphic sequences described by earlier works. The central fold belt, composed of an open, asymmetric syncline and an overturned, isoclinal anticline, is cut by an axial-plane parallel reactivated thrust zone that is intruded by a deformed Paleoproterozoic mafic dike. Finite strain analyses of fold geometries, shear fabrics, foliations, fold vergence, and strained clasts point to Paleoproterozoic northwest-directed thrusting associated with the Mazatzal orogen at approximately 1650 million years ago. Previous studies constrained the regional P-T conditions to at least the upper andalusite-kyanite boundary at peak metamorphic conditions, which ranged from 4-6 kilobars and 350-450⁰ Celsius, although the plasticity of deformation in a large anticlinal core suggests that this represents the low end of the P-T conditions. Subsequent to deformation, the rocks were intruded by several granitoid plutons, likely of Mesoproterozoic age (1300-1400 Ma). A detailed analysis of Proterozoic strain solidly places the structure of the McDowell Mountains within the confines of the Mazatzal Orogeny, pending any contradictory geochronological data.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Differential movement across Byrd Glacier, Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica as Indicated by (U-Th)/He thermochronology and geomorphology

Description

The Byrd Glacier region of Antarctica is important for understanding the tectonic development and landscape evolution of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). This outlet glacier crossing the TAM marks a major

The Byrd Glacier region of Antarctica is important for understanding the tectonic development and landscape evolution of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). This outlet glacier crossing the TAM marks a major discontinuity in the Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic Ross orogen. The region has not been geologically mapped in detail, but previous studies have inferred a fault to exist beneath and parallel to the direction of flow of Byrd Glacier. Thermochronologic analysis has never been undertaken across Byrd Glacier, and little is known of the exhumation history of the region. The objectives of this study are to assess possible differential movement across the inferred Byrd Glacier fault, to measure the timing of exhumation, and to gain a better overall understanding of the structural architecture of the TAM. Apatites and zircons separated from rock samples collected from various locations north and south of Byrd Glacier were dated using single-crystal (U- Th)/He analysis. Similar cooling histories were revealed with comparable exhumation rates of 0.03 ± 0.003 and 0.04 ± 0.03 mm/yr north and south of Byrd Glacier from apatite data and somewhat similar rates of 0.06 ± 0.008 and 0.04 ± 0.01 mm/yr north and south of Byrd Glacier from zircon data. Age vs. elevation regressions indicate a vertical offset of 1379 ± 159 m and 4000 ± 3466 m from apatite and zircon data. To assess differential movement, the Kukri Peneplain (a regional unconformity) was utilized as a datum. On-site photographs, Landsat imagery, and Aster Global DEM data were combined to map Kukri Peneplain elevation points north and south of Byrd Glacier. The difference in elevation of the peneplain as projected across Byrd Glacier shows an offset of 1122 ± 4.7 m. This study suggests a model of relatively uniform exhumation followed by fault displacement that uplifted the south side of Byrd Glacier relative to the north side. Combining apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He analysis along with remote geomorphologic analysis has provided an understanding of the differential movement and exhumation history of crustal blocks in the Byrd Glacier region. The results complement thermochronologic and geomorphologic studies elsewhere within the TAM providing more information and a new approach.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Timing and structural control of gold mineralization, Santa Gertrudis, Sonora, Mexico

Description

The Santa Gertrudis Mining District of Sonora, Mexico contains more than a dozen purported Carlin-like, sedimentary-hosted, disseminated-gold deposits. A series of near-surface, mostly oxidized gold deposits were open-pit mined from

The Santa Gertrudis Mining District of Sonora, Mexico contains more than a dozen purported Carlin-like, sedimentary-hosted, disseminated-gold deposits. A series of near-surface, mostly oxidized gold deposits were open-pit mined from the calcareous and clastic units of the Cretaceous Bisbee Group. Gold occurs as finely disseminated, sub-micron coatings on sulfides, associated with argillization and silicification of calcareous, carbonaceous, and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks in structural settings. Gold occurs with elevated levels of As, Hg, Sb, Pb, and Zn. Downhole drill data within distal disseminated gold zones reveal a 5:1 ratio of Ag:Au and strong correlations of Au to Pb and Zn. This study explores the timing and structural control of mineralization utilizing field mapping, geochemical studies, drilling, core logging, and structural analysis. Most field evidence indicates that mineralization is related to a single pulse of moderately differentiated, Eocene intrusives described as Mo-Cu-Au skarn with structurally controlled distal disseminated As-Ag-Au.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011