Matching Items (10)

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What Can (and Should) Be Done: Responding to Sex Trafficking in Russia and Ukraine

Description

In responding to any human rights violation, two questions often arise: what can be done, and who should do it? In response to the horrible violation that is sex trafficking

In responding to any human rights violation, two questions often arise: what can be done, and who should do it? In response to the horrible violation that is sex trafficking in Russia and Ukraine, this paper will explore the historical, social, political, and economic context that facilitates trafficking, identify common understandings of the issue and corresponding approaches, and attempt to synthesize an approach to combatting sex trafficking that will be most effective in Russia and Ukraine. I will argue that an effective anti-trafficking strategy requires four axes of approach, and that current efforts in Russia and Ukraine are currently insufficient in meeting the demands of those axes.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Stardust on Our Boots: Music in the lives of Soviet Soldiers of the Soviet-Afghan War

Description

Music both created and consumed by Soviet soldiers during the war in Afghanistan provides an insight into their opinions and criticisms of the war. Music allowed soldiers to vent, to

Music both created and consumed by Soviet soldiers during the war in Afghanistan provides an insight into their opinions and criticisms of the war. Music allowed soldiers to vent, to give voice to their experiences, as well as to rationalize their participation in the conflict, enabling them to inject their personal opinions and perceptions of the war into memorable and poetic forms. Through analyzing the Soviet songs about the of Afghan war, we can create a chronological timeline charting the development of resentment and disillusionment among Soviet soldiers: the initial patriotic songs borrowed from prior conflicts soon declined in popularity, replaced with mournful songs reflecting soldiers’ nostalgia for home and fear of death in their daily lives. Their lyrics reveal feelings of anxiety, disenfranchisement and abandonment, all resulting from the Soviet state’s ineffective handling of the war. In addition to songs produced by soldiers themselves, bands within Soviet borders such as Kino also wrote songs about the conflict, using their star power to draw attention to the conflict in their own fashion. By tracking both the creation and spread of these songs about the Soviet-Afghan war (referred to in this essay as either the “Soviet-Afghan War” or, more simply, the “Afghan War” as it is known in Russian), we can find vital, overlooked expressions of if not protest then discontent - among the many bubbling to the surface during the last decade of the USSR. This thesis therefore presents a chronological analysis of representative songs from the Soviet-Afghan war that also takes their popularity and methods of propagation -- the material technologies that allowed for this music to be spread -- into account, plotted alongside the major turning points of the war. It uncovers an otherwise forgotten form of discourse between soldiers about both the war itself, as well as the Soviet government, exploring the political implications of the war’s musical memorialization.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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American Nurses at War: From the Veil of Domesticity to Military Service

Description

During the First and Second World Wars, the totality of global war and the involvement of the United States necessitated the use of American women within military medical services as

During the First and Second World Wars, the totality of global war and the involvement of the United States necessitated the use of American women within military medical services as nurses. Military nursing served as a catalyst for professionalizing nursing as well as the entrance women into US military jobs. This thesis explores American women’s military nursing roles during WWI and WWII within the historical context of the precedence set for female nurses’ involvement in wartime medical service in both the American Civil War and the Spanish Civil War. In so doing, it seeks to answer specific research questions focused on nurse’s wartime experiences, the formality of their role, and public perceptions of female nurses. I will examine the change over time of these issues and reasons for their evolution.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

A Morning in Vietnam: The Lives of the Nurses Who Served

Description

The Vietnam War had a lasting effect on both the men and the women who served. While there appears to be plenty of research on how the war impacted the

The Vietnam War had a lasting effect on both the men and the women who served. While there appears to be plenty of research on how the war impacted the lives of the men, there is very little publicity given to how the war impacted the women, despite the extensive documentation in the forms of oral histories and studies. By looking at oral histories and various studies on different aspects of service, such as PTSD, experience, combat exposure, and gender in the conflict, this study recognizes the gaps in the examination of the nurse's experiences in Vietnam. It strives to contribute to the process of forming a more comprehensive study of how the war impacted the women who served. This study will answer the following questions: How did the experiences of the Vietnam War change the lives of the women who served as nurses? What struggles did they face while in service and when they returned home? How did the war impact them psychologically and, thus, change their behavior? Since the majority of the women who served were Army medical personnel, this study will focus on that population. This study begins with an investigation of their prewar lives, their reasons for joining the Army Nurse Corps, and their experiences in basic training. It analyzes their services in Vietnam by examining their experiences, gender roles, and working conditions. Finally, it explores the impact of the war on their lives, through an analysis of their homecoming, the controversy of Agent Orange, and PTSD. It shows how many of these factors would overlap with their experiences, causing trauma and a change in the behavior of these women. In many cases, the nurses changed from innocent and sheltered to depressed, angry, and struggling with their memories. Their experiences before, during, and after the war changed their perceptions of the world and themselves, resulting in increased anxiety, the need for adrenaline, and isolationist behaviors. The war was indiscriminate, and therefore, had a similar impact on both the men and women involved.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Legally Male: The Role of Legal Language in Maintaining Sexism

Description

Psychological studies and feminist theories have determined the existence of many forms of
male bias in the English language. Male bias can be traced through American history in the form

Psychological studies and feminist theories have determined the existence of many forms of
male bias in the English language. Male bias can be traced through American history in the form of laws of coverture and the categorization of women in law. Taking into account the connections between sexist language, history, and law, this paper investigates 1) how and why legal language is biased, 2) why male bias has persisted in law over time, and 3) what impact male-biased law has on women. The works of ancient philosophers, feminist historians, psycholinguistic scientists, and modern philosophers of law are used to explain the patriarchal gender hierarchy’s influence on law. Case law and legal policies demonstrate that sexism has been maintained through history due to the preservation of male-biased language and the exclusion of women from the public sphere. Today, the use of masculine generics continues to taint the legal profession by reflecting, rather than denouncing, its patriarchal roots.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Kogalym: City of Oil

Description

This thesis examines the influence of the Russian oil firm Lukoil on the economic and cultural landscape of the town of Kogalym. Analyzing the propensity of Lukoil to facilitate the

This thesis examines the influence of the Russian oil firm Lukoil on the economic and cultural landscape of the town of Kogalym. Analyzing the propensity of Lukoil to facilitate the creation of both physical and cultural infrastructure, I scrutinize the effects of intervention for the sake of profit. Especially in rural Siberian towns that are in close proximity to petroleum reserves, oil companies often fund cultural tradition, identity, and education projects. In doing this, these corporations decide which elements of Russian culture are worthy of celebration and remembrance. I further argue that vulnerable people are typically subjugated by oil firms in the pursuit of revenue. Able-bodied men are exploited for their labor, women are counted on to turn temporary settlements-which I define as "shift cities"-into thriving cities, and indigenous Russians are expected to give up land that could aid in the oil production process. With seemingly endless wealth at its disposal, companies like Lukoil attempt to instill "ideal" values into the residents of their cities in an attempt to curate a group of people that feel indebted to the firms for funding their livelihoods. By autonomously deciding what defines Russian identity, I argue that these oil conglomerates ultimately exert financial and cultural control on the people they purport to be helping. This is not without consequence, and I carefully explore the unintended effects of this intervention, such as the rise of illicit economies, arrested development shift cities, the plight of indigenous Russians who find themselves in land disputes with oil firms, and the environmental consequences of the imperfect Russian oil infrastructure.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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To live on a square foot of space"": The Barriers to a Realization of Freedom in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

Description

A recent trend in literary research has focused on how authors' use of space reveals underlying motivations and conveys thematic information. In this thesis, the role that space plays in

A recent trend in literary research has focused on how authors' use of space reveals underlying motivations and conveys thematic information. In this thesis, the role that space plays in Dostoevsky's portrayal of freedom in the novel Crime and Punishment is analyzed with a focus on the physical spaces of St. Petersburg, the mental spaces formed by characters in the story, and how the barriers to the realization of freedom manifest in both. Although Dostoevsky is one of the most notable authors of the Petersburg genre and there has been a lot of discussion about his treatment of individual freedom, there hasn't been a close analysis done in the field that addresses freedom through the analysis of spatial motifs. While all of the characters exist in a common space, they each show a unique approach to their environment due to their personal ideologies, suggesting that they each also realize a varying degree of freedom. I closely analyze the characters Raskolnikov, Svidrigailov, Katerina, Luzhin, Marmeladov, Sonya, and Porfiry as examples of the hierarchy of realized freedom that they attain in the book as seen through their ideologies in interaction with space. Looking at how Dostoevsky presents the environments of the text as either reflections or sources of conflict for characters' mental ideologies, one can see that freedom requires both interaction with the real world as well as a stable lens through which one may perceive it, ultimately necessitating that individuals embrace the potential of suffering as well.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Role of Implicit Gender Bias in the Courtroom

Description

My thesis explores the role that implicit gender bias plays in the courtroom. From personal experience, I have seen the way that gender has been a factor in the courtroom

My thesis explores the role that implicit gender bias plays in the courtroom. From personal experience, I have seen the way that gender has been a factor in the courtroom as a result of both competing in and coaching Mock Trial. As a competitor, my gender was always a factor in that I was told that I couldn't do something because I am female. As a coach, I found myself reinforcing these ideas of gender because that was what I was taught, even though I didn't agree with them. I decided to explore the role of gender in the courtroom using Mock Trial as a framework to study how implicit gender biases is present. As a result of my research, I argue that implicit gender bias is present in the courtroom, and that these biases create barriers for female success. I have conducted research based on a variety of sources, beginning with looking at the role women have historically played in the courtroom to current issues facing women attorneys today. I have researched the role of implicit gender bias and studied how these biases impact women and hinder their success. I conducted research through distribution of the coach survey and analyzed the responses. From these finding I have concluded that implicit gender bias is a factor in the courtroom and that these biases tend to negatively affect women competitors. I conclude that that more research and studies need to be done to make individuals aware of how implicit gender bias functions in the courtroom and how coaches in Mock Trial may be contributing to the reinforcement of these biases.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Influence of Feminism on the Development of Toxic Masculinity

Description

The popularity of feminism is growing. Every day more people claim to be feminist and work is done to end the control of patriarchy. Feminism though, because of its different

The popularity of feminism is growing. Every day more people claim to be feminist and work is done to end the control of patriarchy. Feminism though, because of its different waves and isolated recognition in the media, the actual goals seem unclear to males in particular; it is predicted that this increase in popularity in conjunction with the lack of clarity contributes to the development of toxic masculinity. “Feminism” is defined by bell hooks as a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression and “toxic masculinity” is a specific model of manhood, geared toward dominance and control and fear of the opposite. To understand the relationship between the two, the documentaries The Mask You Live In and Miss Representation were reviewed as well as books by bell hooks and C.J. Pascoe. Popular culture articles contributed to contemporary views at the public level. Using the knowledge gained from the literature, further research was done through one-on-one interviews with males age 18 to 32. Much of the literature does support toxic masculinity being encouraged and reinforced in varying ways including through the lack of acceptance of femininity and society’s strict gender roles. The interviews were inconclusive in defining a direct relationship between feminism promoting the development of toxic masculinity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Chaos, Control, and Disgust: Emotional Knowledges of Menstrual Products

Description

The purpose of this thesis project is to situate emotional knowledge of conventional and alternative menstrual products within cultural processes that construct menstrual shame and taboo. This study employs both

The purpose of this thesis project is to situate emotional knowledge of conventional and alternative menstrual products within cultural processes that construct menstrual shame and taboo. This study employs both quantitative and qualitative research methods - a survey distributed via snowball recruitment and an age-selected follow-up oral interview- to analyze emotions associated with specific menstrual products. I find that fear and disgust are the two most significant emotions to influence menstrual product choice - fear associated predominantly with penetrative internal products and disgust associated with external products that do not sufficiently contain the chaotic flow of menstrual blood. Ultimately, I argue that menstrual disgust and shame born from the construction of the menstruating female body as anarchic, threatening, and inferior to the male body permeates the daily lives of women through their relationships to and emotions towards menstrual products, their periods, and their bodies in general. I discuss how these relationships are modulated throughout the lifecycle by approaches to formal menstrual education approaches that instill shame and disgust, as well as the embodied experiences of pregnancy and birth. I also discuss implications for activist approaches to menstrual education and present the issue of menstrual suppression via birth control.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12