Matching Items (24)

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So Much Drama!: Teaching High School Theatre

Description

This project and research intended to address how to successfully run and teach a high school level Theatre I course. The research portion of the project focused on activities to

This project and research intended to address how to successfully run and teach a high school level Theatre I course. The research portion of the project focused on activities to use in the classroom, how to run a drama club and put on productions, and how to create a positive classroom environment where students feel comfortable creating art. The creation portion of the project focused on the things a teacher will need in the classroom: an introduction letter, vision statement, syllabus, and unit plans. The final product includes three unit plans: Introduction to Theatre I, Introduction to Acting, and Theatre and Social Change. The use of the materials in this thesis can help first-time Theatre teachers to become better prepared to run their classroom.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Helen Project

Description

Though people are beginning to analyze the internet as an active social force, a seemingly insurmountable problem permeates all criticisms of the world wide web: how do we begin to

Though people are beginning to analyze the internet as an active social force, a seemingly insurmountable problem permeates all criticisms of the world wide web: how do we begin to frame the Internet as a subject of inquiry when its role in our lives is constantly shifting, continually slipping from definition, yet undeniably reconstructing a new human condition? I believe an answer may lie in placing the Internet within the context of the Faust Myth \u2014 a legend that has repeatedly been used to explore humanity's obsession with power. For my undergraduate honors thesis, I wrote and performed an adaptation of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus in which I frame the Internet as a modern Faustian contract, and advocate a new approach to the use of technology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Blockbusted - A One-Act Play

Description

BLOCKBUSTED is a one-act play about Clyde, a 12-year-old boy who has a pretty wild imagination. After losing in a very competitive sand castle building competition, Clyde is determined to

BLOCKBUSTED is a one-act play about Clyde, a 12-year-old boy who has a pretty wild imagination. After losing in a very competitive sand castle building competition, Clyde is determined to prove to his father that he is in fact not a failure. When Clyde's father becomes sick with a very uncommon disease, Clyde must find a way to get the money required for his father's surgery. A mysterious being offers Clyde the chance to get the money, but Clyde must go on a journey and bring back a secret treasure. Clyde ends up traveling to the last remaining Blockbuster Video store where he must complete various tasks in order to receive the treasure. Along the way, Clyde unexpectedly meets up with his former best friends who go with him on his journey. Their relationship is put to the test, as they must find a way to work together to help Clyde save his father while also learning that having personal quirks isn't always a bad thing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Forget Me Not: A Play on Media, Legacy, and the Significance of Female Friendship

Description

The process of playwriting is much more than merely writing the script itself; it is a process of outlining, writing, rewriting, and rewriting some more. This project explores that process

The process of playwriting is much more than merely writing the script itself; it is a process of outlining, writing, rewriting, and rewriting some more. This project explores that process from the very beginning to the late stages of final rewrites on a full-length, two-act stage play, Forget Me Not. Thematically, the play addresses issues such as legacy, ambition, the limitations of memory, and the complex relationships between women. It also speaks to the possibility of hope and revolves around twenty-something characters who are not nihilistic or pretentious as in the frequently-dominant portrayal of that demographic, but rather witty, intelligent, and layered. The play applies techniques of playwriting with a focus on character development as the element that drives the story, while also playing with conceptions of memory and time through the framing device, structure, and narration. A craft essay follows the script of the play, detailing the process of conceptualizing, writing, and revising the play.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Classroom Where it Happens: A Unit in Secondary English

Description

My topic is derived from my field of study of English, Secondary Education and will focus on the integration of the hit Broadway musical 'Hamilton: An American Musical' into a

My topic is derived from my field of study of English, Secondary Education and will focus on the integration of the hit Broadway musical 'Hamilton: An American Musical' into a secondary education English curriculum. My compelling question is: How does 'Hamilton' affect diverse students’ perspectives on their individual potential? It is my belief that students will be changed after seeing the show, that they will feel empowered by the unique representation and modern casting of the musical. There is so much to learn from 'Hamilton' and its effects on the affective domain of learning. My interest in this topic lies not only in musical theatre and education, but more specifically in the intersection of the two. It is through the intentional casting decisions and strategic musical arrangements of 'Hamilton' that students will be impacted — decisions and arrangements that challenge all preconceived notions about musical theatre and American history. Having seen 'Hamilton' twice now, and having been equally moved each time, I am able to conceptualize the emotions of a diverse student body as they experience the show in any capacity. Seeing four of the most prominent men in American history in a room together, represented as men of color is powerful. Seeing sisters love and support each other despite their various skin colors and hair textures is powerful. Seeing children that don’t look like their parents is powerful. Hearing American history recounted through hip-hop verse is powerful. Casting the story of American-then as America-now is powerful. The main goal of my thesis is to help young, diverse minds understand that they have a voice, that they are important, that they can be anything they want to be. Young audience members see themselves represented in the diversity presented onstage in 'Hamilton,' an experience that is unique to the production of this musical. Through the lessons and curriculum I design, students will be able to measure what they believed about themselves and their situations before experiencing 'Hamilton,' and how those beliefs about themselves may have changed as a result of experiencing this life-changing show.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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The Alien Play: A Full-Length Play on Mental Illness, Spirituality, and Extra-Terrestrials

Description

The Alien Play, as posted here, is a placeholder name for this working draft of a full-length stage play that functions as part-science-fiction adventure, part-spiritual-parable. As the process of playwriting

The Alien Play, as posted here, is a placeholder name for this working draft of a full-length stage play that functions as part-science-fiction adventure, part-spiritual-parable. As the process of playwriting is a complex array of research, outlining, drafting, revising and editing, the play is preceded by a craft essay detailing the playwright's inspiration, research, and narrative design. In order to complete this project, the playwright conducted research in the field of religious studies, focusing specifically on the phenomena of paranormal experiences through the lenses of psychology, sociology, and philosophy, asking questions such as: How and why do new religions arise? In what ways (narrative, content, structure, etc.) do these new religions reflect the spiritualist mythologies or religious institutions of the past? What do these similarities or differences say about the social, economic, or political atmospheres that give rise to such movements?

More specifically, this play works within the cross-section of religion/spirituality, mental illness, and UFO and other extra-terrestrial related anomalies to ask such questions as: What does it mean to be Human? What does it mean to be "alien" or Other? How do we internally and externally construct a binary between Humanness and Otherness, between Self and Other? How do we construct reality? In what ways does this anthropomorphize our conceptions of the Human or the Other? In what ways, specifically, may this affect our understanding or manifestation of mental illness, in ourself and others?

The play you see here is a final draft for the thesis, but is still in development elsewhere. Here is a brief log line (i.e. a short description of the general plot and conflict of a script) for the piece: Four sisters from a broken home must deal with the sudden discovery of their late father's communication with an extra-terrestrial race bearing a message of Love-and-Peace. When they, too, begin to communicate with the E.T.'s, they must juggle issues of mental illness, memory, and trauma all while outrunning a shadow government that will stop at nothing to uncover their secret.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Original Sin: A New Play and Poetry Collection

Description

Original Sin is a new play and poetry collection that tells the stories of mythological women and femmes, including Eve, Niobe, Queen Isis, Hera, Athena, Demeter, Ganymede, and Persephone. The

Original Sin is a new play and poetry collection that tells the stories of mythological women and femmes, including Eve, Niobe, Queen Isis, Hera, Athena, Demeter, Ganymede, and Persephone. The words are comprised of the monologues of living women interviewed specifically for the purposes of this project, fighting to "take their stories back" from the monolithic male voices which have held them fast. These words were converted into a free verse poetic series of monologues intended to be presented on the stage. At its core, Original Sin is about the relationship between hope and loss, and how empowerment is born from their collision. Original Sin was first written, directed and staged by Emily Adams at Binary Theatre Company in Tempe, Arizona. The first production opened at the Prism Space on February 23rd, 2018.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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A bilingual, bicultural interpreter and researcher navigates blurry boundaries and intersectionality

Description

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process of deaf students in kindergarten classrooms in three countries. The course of this paper will focus on three instances that took place in Japan and America. The analysis of these examples will bring to light the concept of taking on multiple roles, including graduate research assistant, interpreter, cultural mediator, and sociolinguistic consultant within a research project serving to uncover challenging personal and professional dilemmas and crossing boundaries; the dual roles, interpreter and researcher being the primary focus. This analysis results in a brief look at a thought provoking, yet evolving task of the researcher/interpreter. Maintaining multiple roles in the study the researcher is able to potentially identify and contribute "hidden" knowledge that may have been overlooked by other members of the research team. Balancing these different roles become key implications when interpreting practice, ethical boundaries, and participant research at times the lines of separation are blurred.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Social class bias in evaluator commentaries for the AP language and composition exam (2000-2010), a critical discourse analysis

Description

This study is a discourse analysis and deconstruction of public documents published electronically in connection with the evaluation of the Advanced Placement Language and Composition Examination, found on the educational

This study is a discourse analysis and deconstruction of public documents published electronically in connection with the evaluation of the Advanced Placement Language and Composition Examination, found on the educational website: apcentral.collegeboard.com. The subject of this dissertation is how the characteristic of writing identified as Voice functions covertly in the calibration of raters' evaluation of student writing in two sets of electronic commentaries: the Scoring Commentaries and the Student Performance Q&A;'s published between the years 2000-2010. The study is intended to contribute to both socio-linguistic and sociological research in education on the influence of inherited forms of cultural capital in educational attainment, with particular emphasis upon performance on high-stakes examinations. Modeled after Pierre Bourdieu's inquiry into the latent bias revealed in the "euphemized" language of teacher commentary found in The State Nobility, lists of recurrent descriptors and binary oppositions in the texts are deconstructed. The result of the deconstruction is the manifestation of latent class bias in the commentaries. Conclusions: discourse analysis reveals that a particular Voice, expressive of a preferred social class identity, which is initiated to and particularly deft in such academic performances, is rewarded by the test evaluators. Similarly, findings reveal that a low-scoring essay is negatively critiqued for being particularly unaccustomed to the form(s) of knowledge and style of writing required by the test situation. In summation, a high score on the AP Language Examination, rather than a certification of writerly competence, is actually a testament to the performance of cultural capital. Following an analysis of the language of classification and assessment in the electronic documents, the author provides several "tactics" (after de Certeau) or recommendations for writing the AP Language and Composition Examination, conducive to the stylistic performances privileged by the rating system.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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In the penal colony

Description

ABSTRACT "In the Penal Colony" is a three-act play based on the original short story by Franz Kafka and adapted by ASU MFA playwright Christian Krauspe. Told in flashback-form; a

ABSTRACT "In the Penal Colony" is a three-act play based on the original short story by Franz Kafka and adapted by ASU MFA playwright Christian Krauspe. Told in flashback-form; a lone female Traveler arrives at a nameless penal colony where she is asked to comment on an old execution device known simply as, "the apparatus." She is pressured by the colonies administration to condone the practice while simultaneously asked to endorse the machine by her guiding officer in hopes of preserving the mystical powers the apparatus seems to possess. The Traveler must make the choice to endorse or condone the machine while she faces her own demons in the process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011