Matching Items (3)

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Study of Exhaust Throttling Effects on SI Engine Performance

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To determine the effects of exhaust heat recovery systems on small engines, an experiment was performed to measure the power losses of an engine with restricted exhaust flow. In cooperation

To determine the effects of exhaust heat recovery systems on small engines, an experiment was performed to measure the power losses of an engine with restricted exhaust flow. In cooperation with ASU's SAE Formula race team, a water brake dynamometer was refurbished and connected to the 2017 racecar engine. The engine was mounted with a diffuser disc exhaust to restrict flow, and a pressure sensor was installed in the O2 port to measure pressure under different restrictions. During testing, problems with the equipment prevented suitable from being generated. Using failure root cause analysis, the failure modes were identified and plans were made to resolve those issues. While no useful data was generated, the project successfully rebuilt a dynamometer for students to use for future engine research.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Exhaust System Design and Testing Methods

Description

The exhaust system is an integral part of any internal combustion engine. A well- designed exhaust system efficiently removes exhaust gasses expelled from the cylinders. If tuned for performance purposes,

The exhaust system is an integral part of any internal combustion engine. A well- designed exhaust system efficiently removes exhaust gasses expelled from the cylinders. If tuned for performance purposes, the exhaust system can also exhibit scavenging and supercharging characteristics. This project reviews the major components of an exhaust system and discusses the proper design techniques necessary to utilize the performance boosting potential of a tuned exhaust system for a four-stroke engine. These design considerations are then applied to Arizona State University's Formula SAE vehicle by comparing the existing system to a properly tuned system. An inexpensive testing method, developed specifically for this project, is used to test the effectiveness of the current design. The results of the test determined that the current design is ineffective at scavenging neighboring pipes of exhaust gasses and should be redesigned for better performance.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Dirt on Dirty Baseballs: How Surface Parameters Affect Baseball Aerodynamics

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This study consisted of two fundamental experiments that examined the effects of surface parameters on baseball aerodynamics. The first experiment measured drag and lift coefficients in response to varied surface

This study consisted of two fundamental experiments that examined the effects of surface parameters on baseball aerodynamics. The first experiment measured drag and lift coefficients in response to varied surface treatments of a non-spinning baseball. This experiment found that rougher surfaces (rubbing mud, increased ball usage, and scuffing) decrease drag coefficient by up to 0.05 for Reynolds numbers of up to 1.5x105 (wind speeds of 30 m/s or 67 mph). The maximum observed increase in lift coefficient was 0.20, caused by heavily scuffing the top of the ball. These results can be explained by boundary layer transition phenomena and asymmetry in the surface roughness of the ball. A decrease in drag coefficient of 0.05 can translate to an increase in the flight distance of a batted ball by as much as 50 ft (14%), and an increase of 0.20 in lift coefficient can increase flight distance by 70 ft (19%) \u2014 numbers that can easily mean the difference between a routine fly out and a monster home run. The second experiment measured drag and lift coefficients in response to varied stitch geometries of a non-spinning, 3D-printed baseball. Increasing stitch height, width, and spacing was found to increase drag coefficient, while increasing stitch length had little effect on lift coefficient. Increasing any parameter of the stitch geometry was found to increase lift coefficient. These results can be explained by boundary layer transition phenomena, blockage effects, and asymmetry in the stitch geometry of the ball. Future work would do well to repeat these experiments with a larger wind tunnel and a more sensitive force balance. These results should also be validated at higher wind speeds, and for spinning, rather than stationary baseballs. In addition, future work should explore the degree to which surface roughness and stitch geometry affect drag and lift coefficients at different ball orientations.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05