Matching Items (3)

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Music in the Classroom: A Look at Melodies and Phonics Retention

Description

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For two groups in the study, the teachers used melodies to instruct students, while the third group was held to direct instruction with no music to use for assistance. The study groups were three second-grade classes at Ishikawa Elementary School, where I was serving as a student teacher. Parental consent was received for each of the students participating in the study. The duration of the study was one week. The first test group was given a familiar melody with new lyrics to reflect the content of the phonics rule "I before E except after C." The second test group was given a melody composed specifically to accompany the phonics rule and to reflect the appropriate phonics content. On the first day of the study, students were given a pretest; these scores were recorded and then compared to the posttest scores from the end of the week. The data that were collected compared groups as a whole through composite scores from pretest to posttest to determine most effective methodology. The groups that were instructed using music demonstrated greater growth and had higher posttest scores.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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An Investigation of String Project Teachers’ and Directors’ Perspectives on the Skills and Behaviors Important for String Teaching

Description

This study examined directors’, master teachers’, graduate and undergraduate

String Project teachers’ perspectives of the skills and behaviors important for teaching strings. Participants were from the 40 String Projects listed on

This study examined directors’, master teachers’, graduate and undergraduate

String Project teachers’ perspectives of the skills and behaviors important for teaching strings. Participants were from the 40 String Projects listed on the National String Project Consortium website, including String Project directors (n = 16), master teachers (n = 7), graduate (n = 6) and undergraduate string teachers (n = 46) involved in String Projects across the United States. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 72 years old.

The survey for this study was based on Teachout’s 1997 survey pertaining to teachers’ skills and behaviors in three categories: teaching, personal, musical. A cover letter containing a link to the electronic survey was sent to directors and master teachers for the 40 String Projects, requesting their participation and the participation of their string teachers. Seventy-five participants from 19 String Projects completed the survey.

Means and standard deviations were calculated for each item for each of the four participant groups. Overall means for each category of skills and behaviors were calculated followed by a one-way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) to determine which of the three categories the teachers and directors believed most important. Three one-way MANOVAs were used to analyze participants’ perspectives for three broad categories of skills and behaviors (personal, teaching, and musical) across the four participant groups. No significant differences were found across all three MANOVA analyses. Additionally, descriptive statistics were used to determine the rankings of importance for the four participant groups on 40 survey items.

Results showed that participants in all four groups believed that personal skills and behaviors were more important than teaching and musical skills and behaviors.

Also conducted were Pearson Product-Moment Correlations, which analyses revealed a strong positive relationship between the ranked perceptions of musical and teaching skills and behaviors (r = .78, p = .00), between musical and personal skills and behaviors (r = .65, p = .00), and between personal and teaching skills and behaviors (r = .84, p = .00). Strong positive correlations were found between the three categories. Recommendations for research and practice were given.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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An investigation of finger motion and hand posture during clarinet performance

Description

Finger motion and hand posture of six professional clarinetists (defined by entrance into or completion of a doctorate of musical arts degree in clarinet performance) were recorded using a pair

Finger motion and hand posture of six professional clarinetists (defined by entrance into or completion of a doctorate of musical arts degree in clarinet performance) were recorded using a pair of CyberGloves® in Arizona State University's Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing Laboratory. Performance tasks included performing a slurred three-octave chromatic scale in sixteenth notes, at sixty quarter-note beats per minute, three times, with a metronome and a short pause between repetitions, and forming three pedagogical hand postures. Following the CyberGloves® tasks, each subject completed a questionnaire about equipment, playing history, practice routines, health practices, and hand usage during computer and sports activities. CyberGlove® data were analyzed to find average hand/finger postures and differences for each pitch across subjects, subject variance in the performance task and differences in ascending and descending postures of the chromatic scale. The data were also analyzed to describe generalized finger posture characteristics based on hand size, whether right hand thumb position affects finger flexion, and whether professional clarinetists use similar finger/hand postures when performing on clarinet, holding a tennis ball, allowing hands to hang freely by the sides, or form a "C" shape. The findings of this study suggest an individual approach based on hand size is necessary for teaching clarinet hand posture.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011