Matching Items (12)

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Teacher stressors in an Arizona urban school district

Description

Teachers have the one of the most difficult, yet most rewarding jobs to guide our impressionable youth into academically prepared independent thinkers. This undertaking requires a commitment, as well as an enormous effort that can oftentimes be overwhelming. Teaching has

Teachers have the one of the most difficult, yet most rewarding jobs to guide our impressionable youth into academically prepared independent thinkers. This undertaking requires a commitment, as well as an enormous effort that can oftentimes be overwhelming. Teaching has been found to be a stressful profession for several decades with the potential concern of negative consequences for both teachers and students. The purpose of this study was to view mutual influences that affected the stress levels of urban teachers, as well as gather possible solutions to help alleviate some areas of stress. This study evaluated an urban school district in Arizona to uncover existing stressors for elementary teachers. Through qualitative analysis, this study utilized focus group interviews within this urban district, which consisted of 20 teachers in various grade levels. Four to five teachers formed each focus group, where participants responded to six open-ended questions in a candid setting. Using the grounded theory, major and minor themes emerged as a result of teacher responses that revealed trends and commonalities. Additionally, participants relayed their suggestions to mitigate some of these stressors. This study revealed that the some of the stressors that surfaced were common to the entire group, while some grade level subgroups differed in areas of stress. The suggestion to implement purposeful support systems to improve the stress of teachers was recommended with the proposal to reexamine the results for their effectiveness in future studies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Classroom resiliency: a comparison of Navajo elementary students' perceptions of their classroom environment

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Attitude and perspectives of teachers regarding principal effectiveness

Description

Educational Leadership is inherent of many qualities. Individuals who possess leadership stand apart from the mainstream population in general society and in any organization, thus they are change agents who influence others by their uniqueness and dynamism. The art of

Educational Leadership is inherent of many qualities. Individuals who possess leadership stand apart from the mainstream population in general society and in any organization, thus they are change agents who influence others by their uniqueness and dynamism. The art of leadership is challenging, but meaningful, and purposeful as the focus is implementation of consistent affective and effective practices at all levels to assure achievable outcomes no matter the organization type. A leader's calling is rewarding and the journey is that of making and sustaining change through influence. The purpose of this study centered on the relationship factor of educational leadership especially the dynamics between the principal and the teacher and what constructs affect this relationship to affect principal effectiveness. The methodology employed a quantitative format and consisted of a 20 question survey sent to one school district's teachers (N=465) over a 3 month window. The summaries of results were presented in two formats: Raw (exactly how teachers answered) and a Cross-tabulation (Age & Licensure). The findings of the study yielded attitudes and perspectives of teachers regarding valuable information on leadership behaviors, styles, and practices that teachers believe were relevant to principal effectiveness. The most noteworthy aspect gleaned from this study was the people factor wherein relationships are a key factor to a leader's success in any realm that one leads.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Factors affecting teacher satisfaction in an urban school district

Description

The purpose of this study was to distinguish factors that influence the satisfaction levels of teachers in urban school districts. This work also distinguished factors that directly impacted teachers' level of satisfaction towards their work and their attitude towards the

The purpose of this study was to distinguish factors that influence the satisfaction levels of teachers in urban school districts. This work also distinguished factors that directly impacted teachers' level of satisfaction towards their work and their attitude towards the administration of their schools. Forty-one teachers from two kindergarten through eighth grade schools in the southwest region of the United States were given a modified version of the 2007/08 Schools and Staffing Survey, a federally recognized survey on the satisfaction levels of teachers in America, combined with a select number of questions created by the researcher in this study to address the research questions of this study. Data were collected and analyzed through Survey Monkey, an online data portal, and imported into SPSS for data analysis. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were compiled to provide answers to the research questions established for this study. Results from this study indicated that although a majority of teachers sampled were satisfied with their teaching positions (78%), kindergarten through fourth grade teachers were more satisfied than teachers in the older grades. For the whole group, salary was the most influential factor; however, the teachers with 11 to 15 years of experience were the only ones who chose salary as their primary choice to increase their satisfaction. This study found that the levels of satisfaction per subgroup (teachers' years of experience, level of education, gender, age, type of certification, and grade level) were different than the group needs as a whole. This study revealed that the needs of the whole group and the needs of the subgroups can differ, consequently individual differences of the staff need to be taken into consideration. To view the staff as a whole may discredit the needs of the individual. Even though data indicated that a significant number of teachers felt supported by their administration, this study revealed the need for administrative staff to address specific issues of subgroups in their schools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Factors influencing academic achievement for Salt River students

Description

ABSTRACT Native American students from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community have attended Stapley Junior High, one of 13 junior high schools in the Mesa Unified School District, since its doors opened in the fall of 1994. Over the years

ABSTRACT Native American students from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community have attended Stapley Junior High, one of 13 junior high schools in the Mesa Unified School District, since its doors opened in the fall of 1994. Over the years a variety of instructional practices have been used in an effort to improve academic outcomes for these students, who have posed a challenge to traditional educational methods. Interviews were conducted with eight educational professionals, including teachers, administrators, and a tutor who worked with these students on a daily basis. They each responded to the same series of questions, providing their insights based on first-hand interactions and knowledge. The interviews revealed factors that influenced student academic success, including caring, trust, communication, tutoring, and administrative support. Factors posing challenges to student success were identified as attendance, parental support, and gangs and drugs. In-school influences were arts and sports, friendship, inclusion, and behavior. Out-of-school influences were home and family, the concept of time, and educational considerations. The conclusion is that this is a complex problem, fueled by the proximity of the reservation to a major metropolitan area, the gang culture that is prevalent in the Salt River community, poverty, attendance issues, and the impact of parental involvement and support. The things that made a difference at Stapley Jr. High included staff who demonstrated caring by establishing trust and getting to know students on a personal level, teachers who were consistent and held students to a high standard, and teachers who were flexible with regard to time.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Improving Arizona English language learners' mathematics achievement using curriculum-based measures

Description

ABSTRACT

This study was an investigation of the effectiveness of curriculum-based measures (CBMs) on the math achievement of first and second grade English Language Learners (ELL). The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 led to a new educational reform,

ABSTRACT

This study was an investigation of the effectiveness of curriculum-based measures (CBMs) on the math achievement of first and second grade English Language Learners (ELL). The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 led to a new educational reform, which identifies and provides services to students in need of academic support based on English language proficiency. Students are from certain demographics: minorities, low-income families, students with disabilities, and students with limited English proficiency. NCLB intended to lead as to improvement in the quality of the United States educational system.

Four classes from the community of Kayenta, Arizona in the Navajo Nation were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups, one each per grade. All four classes used the state-approved, core math curriculum, but one class in each grade was provided with weekly CBMs for an entire school year that included sample questions developed from the Arizona Department of Education performance standards. The CBMs contained at least one question from each of the five math strands: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data and probability.

The NorthWest Evaluation Assessment (NWEA) served as the pretest and posttest for all four groups. The SAT 10 (RIT scores) math test, administered near the time of the pretest, served as the covariate in the analysis. Two analysis of covariance tests revealed no statistically significant treatment effects, subject gender effects, or interactions for either Grade 1 or Grade 2. Achievement levels were relatively constant across both genders and the two grade levels.

Despite increasing emphasis on assessment and accountability, the achievement gaps between these subpopulations and the general population of students continues to widen. It appears that other variables are responsible for the different achievement levels found among students. Researchers have found that teachers with math certification, degrees related to math, and advanced course work in math leads to improved math performance over students of teachers who lack those qualifications. The design of the current study did not permit analyses of teacher or school effects.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Barriers and encounters of Navajo female administrators

Description

ABSTRACT

Past research has determined the glass ceiling is still unbroken and that few women hold top positions as administrators as opposed to men. Men continue to dominate women in occupations of superintendent and secondary principals of schools. Cultural beliefs

ABSTRACT

Past research has determined the glass ceiling is still unbroken and that few women hold top positions as administrators as opposed to men. Men continue to dominate women in occupations of superintendent and secondary principals of schools. Cultural beliefs and traditions set limitations for Navajo female administrators regarding the taboo of “women can’t lead” mentality. The research questions in this study addressed perceived obstacles and barriers facing Navajo female school administrators, the extent Navajo female administrators believe Navajo beliefs limit their career advancement, and if Navajo female administrators believe they encounter more obstacles than their male counterparts.

Data were collected from 30 Navajo female administrators in public and bureau-operated schools in New Mexico. The survey consisted of 21 questions in a Likert-scale format with restricted responses, accessed on a Survey Monkey website. Results of the survey indicated that the respondents generally believed their career choice and opportunities were supported. However, approximately a quarter of the respondents believed support and opportunities were limited. And the overall data suggest there is room for improvement in all areas. In spite of the negative views, the respondents believe other women should be encouraged to go into school administration.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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ONYX (Oohoo'aah, Na'nitin Yee nooseel Xploria): a proposal for an innovative school for Navajo children

Description

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to describe a new school model for Dine (Navajo) learners where Dine students will experience how to apply knowledge and skills personally, meaningfully, and socially relevant to life situations through the medium of Dine

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to describe a new school model for Dine (Navajo) learners where Dine students will experience how to apply knowledge and skills personally, meaningfully, and socially relevant to life situations through the medium of Dine language and culture maintenance. This study explored a new way to perpetuate Dine (Navajo) culture and language through a model referred to as M.A.T.S. (Mathematics, Arts, Technology, Science, the renaming of STEM and STEAM). Oohoo’aah, Na’nitin Yee nooseel Xploria, which translates to a Center for Learning, acquiring knowledge and growing through a Navajo approach to exploration) is a public charter school serving students in grades K-3. As a public charter school ONYX is to serve all of Jeddito Community, with 98% ratio of students qualifying for free and reduced lunch. ONYX will employ dedicated educators and community members with excellent work ethics who are committed to closing the achievement gap, while promoting a creative outlook on the world around them. Students will leave ONYX School with skills in Navajo Language and Culture with a foundation in M.A.T.S. ONYX School’s educational program will be driven by a belief that all learning will be academically rigorous with a well-designed curriculum to students in becoming lifelong explorers of learning and productive members of society. This will allow ONYX to stay true to the mission to promote K’e (relationship in Navajo Culture), respect for self, others, and environment, most importantly to use natural/traditional scientific skills passed on through Navajo culture. In the learning environment, there will be constant and continuous communication among administrators, teachers, parents, and community leaders. This form of instruction is also transferable to learning how to read and write in Navajo. The program will allow for students to use hands on approach with inquiry based learning with a foundation in Navajo traditional/scientific approach to learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Highly educated Navajo women who pursue their careers off the Navajo reservation

Description

The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the lives of highly educated Navajo women who, with their children, left the comfort of their homeland to pursue their careers. Using qualitative research methods, five Navajo women were

The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the lives of highly educated Navajo women who, with their children, left the comfort of their homeland to pursue their careers. Using qualitative research methods, five Navajo women were asked to reflect on their lives while on the reservation and in their new location off the Navajo reservation. Among the topics explored were the principal factors as to their leaving the reservation, barriers and supports they faced in their careers, what cultural transitions they experienced, and the effects on their careers, their families and to their personal sense of self.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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What are the limitations to teaching Navajo language in the Head Start Immersion Program?

Description

This study investigated the limitations of Navajo language teaching in Navajo Head Start immersion centers. The research questions asked what did Head Start teachers perceive as barriers to Navajo children successfully learning the Navajo language, what skills and knowledge

This study investigated the limitations of Navajo language teaching in Navajo Head Start immersion centers. The research questions asked what did Head Start teachers perceive as barriers to Navajo children successfully learning the Navajo language, what skills and knowledge did Head Start teachers have that were relevant to teach Head Start children the Navajo language, what Head Start teachers perceived as their strengths and weaknesses of the language immersion program, and what program and instructional qualities promoted and restricted the success of the language program? Two males and six females who resided in the western part of the Navajo Nation wee interviewed as to their teaching experiences. All of the interviewees were between the ages of late 40's to mid-60's and all spoke Navajo fluently. They had been employed with Head Start for more than 10 years. They came from families who had strong beliefs in the Navajo culture and language, and believed all teachers should take Navajo language and culture classes to teach in Head Start. The interviews revealed the participants use their traditional language and culture skills to teach Navajo, but they had limited knowledge as how to use the curriculum provided by Division of Dine Education. The English curriculum was accessible and easy to follow, but did not adhered to President Hale's Executive Order to perpetuate the language. It was recommended that Head Start administrators and support staff review the Navajo language policies and regulations, train teachers how to write a lesson plan that was simple and teacher friendly, revamp the curriculums, and train teachers how to critique, analyze and develop lessons from the Navajo Curriculum. In addition, administrators, should monitor and provide technical assistance to ensure teachers are implementing Navajo language instruction according to Navajo Standards and monitoring each child's progress according to developmental domains and assessment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015