Matching Items (5)

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Engineering Education: How Today's Youth Learns CAD Skills in an Online Environment

Description

The purpose of this project is to assess how well today’s youth is able to learn new skills<br/>in the realm of engineering through online video-conferencing resources. Each semester of this<br/>last

The purpose of this project is to assess how well today’s youth is able to learn new skills<br/>in the realm of engineering through online video-conferencing resources. Each semester of this<br/>last year, a class of students in both 3rd and 6th grade learned about computer-aided design (CAD)<br/>and 3D printing through their laptops at school. This was done by conducting online lessons of<br/>TinkerCAD via Zoom and Google Meet. TinkerCAD is a simple website that incorporates easy-to-learn skills and gives students an introduction to some of the basic operations that are used in<br/>everyday CAD endeavors. In each lesson, the students would learn new skills by creating<br/>increasingly difficult objects that would test both their ability to learn new skills and their overall<br/>enjoyment with the subject matter. The findings of this project reflect that students are able to<br/>quickly learn and retain new information relating to CAD. The group of 6th graders was able to<br/>learn much faster, which was expected, but the class of 3rd graders still maintained the<br/>knowledge gained from previous lessons and were able to construct increasingly complicated<br/>objects without much struggle. Overall, the students in both classes enjoyed the lessons and did<br/>not find them too difficult, despite the online environment that we were required to use. Some<br/>students found the material more interesting than others, but in general, the students found it<br/>enjoyable to learn about a new skill that has significant real-world applications

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Modeling 3D-Printed Composite Honeycomb Structures with the Representative Lattice Element Method

Description

The goal of our research was to develop and validate a method for predicting the mechanical behavior of Additively Manufactured multi-material honeycomb structures. Multiple approaches already exist in the field

The goal of our research was to develop and validate a method for predicting the mechanical behavior of Additively Manufactured multi-material honeycomb structures. Multiple approaches already exist in the field for modeling the behavior of cellular materials, including the bulk property assumption, homogenization and strut level characterization [1]. With the bulk property approach, the structure is assumed to behave according to what is known about the material in its bulk formulation, without regard to its geometry or scale. With the homogenization technique, the specimen that is being tested is treated as a solid material within the simulation environment even if the physical specimen is not. Then, reduced mechanical properties are assigned to the specimen to account for any voids that exist within the physical specimen. This approach to mechanical behavior prediction in cellular materials is shape dependent. In other words, the same model cannot be used from one specimen to the next if the cell shapes of those lattices differ in any way. When using the strut level characterization approach, a single strut (the connecting member between nodes constituting a cellular material) is isolated and tested. With this approach, there tends to be a significant deviation in the experimental data due to the small size of the isolated struts. Yet it has the advantage of not being shape sensitive, at least in principle. The method that we developed, and chose to test lies within the latter category, and is what we have coined as the Representative Lattice Element (RLE) Method. This method is modeled after the well-established Representative Volume Element (RVE) method [2]. We define the RLE as the smallest unit over which mechanical tests can be conducted that will provide results which are representative of the larger lattice structure. In other words, the theory is that a single member (or beam in this case) of a honeycomb structure can be taken, tests can be conducted on this member to determine the mechanical properties of the representative lattice element and the results will be representative of the mechanical behavior whole structure. To investigate this theory, we designed specimens, conducted various tensile and compression tests, analyzed the recorded data, conducted a micromechanics study, and performed structural simulation work using commercial Finite Element Analysis software.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Microstructural Control in Fabricating Multifunctional Carbon Fibers

Description

Precursors of carbon fibers include rayon, pitch, and polyacrylonitrile fibers that can be heat-treated for high-strength or high-modulus carbon fibers. Among them, polyacrylonitrile has been used most frequently due to

Precursors of carbon fibers include rayon, pitch, and polyacrylonitrile fibers that can be heat-treated for high-strength or high-modulus carbon fibers. Among them, polyacrylonitrile has been used most frequently due to its low viscosity for easy processing and excellent performance for high-end applications. To further explore polyacrylonitrile-based fibers for better precursors, in this study, carbon nanofillers were introduced in the polymer matrix to examine their reinforcement effects and influences on carbon fiber performance. Two-dimensional graphene nanoplatelets were mainly used for the polymer reinforcement and one-dimensional carbon nanotubes were also incorporated in polyacrylonitrile as a comparison. Dry-jet wet spinning was used to fabricate the composite fibers. Hot-stage drawing and heat-treatment were used to evolve the physical microstructures and molecular morphologies of precursor and carbon fibers. As compared to traditionally used random dispersions, selective placement of nanofillers was effective in improving composite fiber properties and enhancing mechanical and functional behaviors of carbon fibers. The particular position of reinforcement fillers with polymer layers was enabled by the in-house developed spinneret used for fiber spinning. The preferential alignment of graphitic planes contributed to the enhanced mechanical and functional behaviors than those of dispersed nanoparticles in polyacrylonitrile composites. The high in-plane modulus of graphene and the induction to polyacrylonitrile molecular carbonization/graphitization were the motivation for selectively placing graphene nanoplatelets between polyacrylonitrile layers. Mechanical tests, scanning electron microscopy, thermal, and electrical properties were characterized. Applications such as volatile organic compound sensing and pressure sensing were demonstrated.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Fabrication and Characterization of TiO2-PMMA Composite Fibers for Photocatalytic Environmental Remediation

Description

Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide (titania or TiO2) offers enormous potential in solving energy and environmental problems. Immobilization of titania nanoparticles on inert substrates is an effective way of utilizing

Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide (titania or TiO2) offers enormous potential in solving energy and environmental problems. Immobilization of titania nanoparticles on inert substrates is an effective way of utilizing its photocatalytic activity since nanoparticles enable high mass-transport, and immobilization avoids post-treatment separation. For competitive photocatalytic performance, the morphology of the substrate can be engineered to enhance mass-transport and light accessibility. In this work, two types of fiber architectures (i.e., dispersed polymer/titania phase or D-phase, and multi-phase polymer-core/composite-shell fibers or M-phase) were explored as effective substrate solutions for anchoring titania. These fibers were fabricated using a low-cost and scalable fiber spinning technique. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was selected as the substrate material due to its ultraviolet (UV) transparency and stability against oxidative radicals. The work systematically investigates the influence of the fiber porosity on mass-transport and UV light scattering. The properties of the fabricated fiber systems were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), UV-vis spectrophotometry (UV-vis), and mechanical analysis. The photocatalytic performance was characterized by monitoring the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) under UV (i.e., 365 nm) light. Fabrication of photocatalytic support structures was observed to be an optimization problem where porosity improved mass transport but reduced UV accessibility. The D-phase fibers demonstrated the highest MB degradation rate (i.e., 0.116 min-1) due to high porosity (i.e., 33.2 m2/g). The M-phase fibers reported a better degradation rate compared to a D-phase fibers due to higher UV accessibility efficiency.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Design, Fabrication and Characterization of PVA/Nanocarbon Composite Fibers

Description

Polymer fibers have broad applications in wearable electronics, bulletproof vests, batteries, fuel cells, filters, electrodes, conductive wires, and biomedical materials. Polymer fibers display light density and flexibility but are mostly

Polymer fibers have broad applications in wearable electronics, bulletproof vests, batteries, fuel cells, filters, electrodes, conductive wires, and biomedical materials. Polymer fibers display light density and flexibility but are mostly weak and compliant. The ceramic, metallic, and carbon nanoparticles have been frequently included in polymers for fabricating continuous, durable, and functional composite fibers. Nanoparticles display large specific areas, low defect density and can transfer their superior properties to polymer matrices. The main focus of this thesis is to design, fabricate and characterize the polymer
anocarbon composite fibers with unique microstructures and improved mechanical/thermal performance. The dispersions and morphologies of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), the interactions with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) molecules and their influences on fiber properties are studied. The fibers were fabricated using a dry-jet wet spinning method with engineered spinneret design. Three different structured fibers were fabricated, namely, one-phase polymer fiber (1-phase), two-phase core-shell composite fiber (2-phase), and three-phase co-axial composite fiber (3-phase). These polymer or composite fibers were processed at three stages with drawing temperatures of 100˚C, 150˚C, and 200˚C. Different techniques including the mechanical tester, wide-angle X-Ray diffraction (WAXD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) have been used to characterize the fiber microstructures and properties.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018