Matching Items (39)

133697-Thumbnail Image.png

Hysteria, Hegemony, and Horror: An Analysis of "The Yellow Wallpaper"

Description

The goal of my thesis is to examine gender roles and their implications on mental illness in the short story of "The Yellow Wallpaper." The context of this thesis is historical, medical, and literary. The project includes five parts. The

The goal of my thesis is to examine gender roles and their implications on mental illness in the short story of "The Yellow Wallpaper." The context of this thesis is historical, medical, and literary. The project includes five parts. The introduction is an analysis of the various literary criticisms associated with the short story. The second part is research on Charlotte Perkins Gilman and her journey with mental illness. The third part is research and background information on mental illness in the 19th century. The fourth part is research and analysis on the social, political, and economic context of the 19th century in the United States that affected the view of mental illness in the period, such as gender roles. The final part of the thesis is an analysis of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper." The analysis focuses on gender roles of the story and how these relate to the depiction of mental illness. This analysis takes into account the historical background and research when studying the context behind the story. In conclusion, the research and information in this thesis provides a new criticism for readers to consider when analyzing "The Yellow Wallpaper."

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

132459-Thumbnail Image.png

The Divine Feminine: An Examination and Intersectional Re-Canonization of Twentieth Century Feminist Literature

Description

Based on paradigms in feminist theory and criticism, I conduct an analysis of two iconic works of twentieth century American feminist literature. Examining Herland (1915) by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Rubyfruit Jungle (1973) by Rita Mae Brown, I assess their

Based on paradigms in feminist theory and criticism, I conduct an analysis of two iconic works of twentieth century American feminist literature. Examining Herland (1915) by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Rubyfruit Jungle (1973) by Rita Mae Brown, I assess their place within the canon of feminist literature--a canon traditionally thought of as Western. I cyclically explore how this canon parallels movements and institutions in actual feminism, and where the pitfalls in both can be traced. Due to the large span of time betwixt the two novels, I engage the historical progression American women experienced in the twentieth century and pair it with the progress feminist literature was likewise experiencing. Exploring the consequences of depicting women as people rather than male counterparts or others, I analyze the roles of the male gaze, male-less spaces, utopias, construction of female identity, motherhood, and how these culminate in feminine and sexual liberation. Utilizing philosophy from Christine de Pizan’s The Book of the City of Ladies and Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex, I trace the origins of the male gaze and male-less spaces in literature and film and how women are essentially othered. I further employ the criticism of Adrienne Rich’s essay “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence” to explore the roles of motherhood and heterosexual norms specifically. My findings deride the authors for their inability to construct legitimately liberated female protagonists. However, I simultaneously offer deference to the authors for engaging the tools and concepts they had available to them at the time in the interest of crafting powerful feminist narratives. I center on the claim that male-less spaces are difficult to fully as well accurately portray in literature, but the authors attempt to do so to move towards a liberation of women and should be lauded for the contributions they made.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

Professional Improvisation Workshop

Description

The first thought that comes to mind for most people when they hear of improvisation is most likely the memory of a funny performance seen on television shows such as Who’s Line is it Anyway? or perhaps the opportunity to

The first thought that comes to mind for most people when they hear of improvisation is most likely the memory of a funny performance seen on television shows such as Who’s Line is it Anyway? or perhaps the opportunity to be an audience member for a live improv troupe performance. In either of these settings, improvisation can be hilarious, dramatic and entertaining and it makes you wonder how people could possibly be making these scenes up on the spot. Unfortunately, not everyone has first-hand experience with the creative, team-building “magic” of improvisation games and exercises. Watching professional improvisation perform can be intimidating to an observer who hopes to one day be an improvisor themselves. Because of this, the immense benefits that improvisation can have within a professional workplace are often overlooked or ignored. I, myself, never had any experience with improvisation or being on stage until the second semester of my sophomore year when I made the choice to try out for ASU comedy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

In Memory of an Emily

Description

In Memory of an Emily is a piece of creative nonfiction and a short film that together detail the author’s experience with mental illness in the collegiate environment. In its 45 pages, Jackman begins to detail the realities of living

In Memory of an Emily is a piece of creative nonfiction and a short film that together detail the author’s experience with mental illness in the collegiate environment. In its 45 pages, Jackman begins to detail the realities of living with depression, anxiety, and anorexia nervosa. The piece includes five sections of writing, including a preface and four portions describing freshman to senior year. Each section endeavors to explore simplistic and purposefully cliché events common in young adult/collegiate life and juxtapose the banal nature of these events with the experience of the mentally ill. Her story endeavors to explore the emotional truths of pain and suffering, revealing that beneath her tender façade lies a very different existence, one tangled in eating disorders, panic attacks, and overwhelming sadness. While maintaining a story-like quality traditional to creative non-fiction, Jackman ventures to warn with a cautionary tale of pathologizing abnormality and exploring the long lasting effects of childhood trauma. Weaving careful storytelling into an exploration of the mentally ill mind, Jackman keeps the reader both terrifyingly close and far away, whispering painful secrets and then desperately running away with the truth. She speaks frankly of all aspects of life, ranging from far more mundane events, such as break ups and college rejection letters, to complicated issues, such as the suicide of her grandfather and her admission into an eating disorder facility. The author attempts to establish a balanced rapport with the reader, recognizing the need to maintain distance and elicit emotion simultaneously. Jackman writes In Memory of an Emily as a heartbreaking but authentic tale, playing with stream of consciousness and paralyzing emotional description. She opens the door and invites the reader into her mind so as to share in the physical and emotional discomfort of the storyteller, but then promptly slams the door once inside.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

131850-Thumbnail Image.png

Medieval Gender Difference: The Male Figures of Marie de France

Description

The writing of the Medieval period has been influential for centuries yet is often simplified by caricatures of the brave knight and lovely damsel. Especially in terms of gender, this period in western history is particularly strict and binary. However,

The writing of the Medieval period has been influential for centuries yet is often simplified by caricatures of the brave knight and lovely damsel. Especially in terms of gender, this period in western history is particularly strict and binary. However, through unique authors such as Marie de France, a rare female writer of the period, we can see complex, yet subtle, presentations of difference that may be unexpected to some readers. Within the lays of Marie de France, I aim to analyze the feminized male figures of Lanval, Guigemar and Bisclavret as models of gender difference using a lens of modern gender theory, specifically the ideas of theorists such as Judith Butler and R.W. Connell. These male figures of demonstrate deviations from the standard medieval masculinity through androgyny and hyper-masculinity in ways unique for the period. The conventions of the Western medieval culture are then subverted by the supernatural, making the lays lasting examples of gender expression. Using modern theory, we can take a step back from previous historical periods and try to better understand the society and culture of that time and place. By examining these male figures of difference and medieval standards of masculinity of a context long past we can see how to grow and progress further in the modern day. Gender can be understood as a social construct even centuries ago, exemplified by the unique figures of difference presented by such authors as Marie de France. Keeping that in mind, we can reanalyze literature in innovative ways and continue to seek new understandings of gender and masculinity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

134594-Thumbnail Image.png

Ethical Concerns about the Negative Impact of Tourism on Cultural Heritage Sites in Italy

Description

Cultural heritage sites bring people of different backgrounds together to learn about their differences and bond over their shared human history. The tourism industry is an essential tool to access cultural heritage sites, however tourists themselves pose a threat to

Cultural heritage sites bring people of different backgrounds together to learn about their differences and bond over their shared human history. The tourism industry is an essential tool to access cultural heritage sites, however tourists themselves pose a threat to the delicate state of ancient ruins and heritage objects. The ways in which tourists interact with cultural heritage sites negatively impacts them, resulting in the premature destruction of cultural heritage, a non-renewable resource. These damaging behaviors may include leaving the guided path, resting on the ruins themselves, touching vulnerable parts of the ruins, and committing acts of vandalism. Tourism must be managed, as the industry works to bring business and revenue into its host community. However, the industry also brings concerns of commercialization to the area, risking the integrity of the site. My research revolves around case studies of Pompeii and the Capuchin Crypt, and their underlying tension with the booming international tourism industry of Italy. Pompeii is not actually the "city frozen in time" by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, but rather an active archaeological site from which a lot can be learned. The Capuchin Crypt is an exquisite expression of beauty in the face of death that features chambers of biblical scenes reenacted with the human remains of Capuchin friars. Each of the sites reflects an aspect of the identity of Italy as a nation and of Italians as individuals, all contributing to a greater global identity. My case studies and research allowed me to find solutions that promote the collaboration between tourism and cultural heritage sites, rather than a state of constant tension.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-05

134112-Thumbnail Image.png

Me and the Suicides: A Novella

Description

In my experience as a reader, depictions of depression or suicidal ideation in fiction are most often conveyed through social realism or otherwise realistically grounded writing. This makes sense given the subject matter, as one would intuitively think to depict

In my experience as a reader, depictions of depression or suicidal ideation in fiction are most often conveyed through social realism or otherwise realistically grounded writing. This makes sense given the subject matter, as one would intuitively think to depict mental or emotional trauma in a very sobering way, but I felt that one could merge the topic with a more absurdist, magical realist-inspired style while staying reverent to the emotional experience. I also find that stories that approach their subtext too seriously can stray very easily into plain didacticism, as opposed to a work that tries to entertain first. I concluded that conveying the experience of isolation and depression through metaphor would be the most emotionally rewarding or enlightening experience for the reader. The central premise of the story is, to me, a metaphor; a young man isolated from society, and haunted by past experiences, who comes to be literally haunted by ghosts with similar experiences. From that starting point I wanted to explore the perspectives of several of the ghosts in a multiple-protagonist format, structuring the present-day storyline around the flashbacks of three of the ghosts. I wanted each of the ghosts' backstories to present a kind of variation on the larger cultural "depression narrative", with some of them perhaps being more recognizable cultural symbols (such as Kryz in the role of the traumatized former soldier), but all being shown in specific, idiosyncratic ways. The content of each ghost's storyline came, again, from thinking of ways to metaphorically represent their particular emotional issues; Sarah, for example, literally has no shadow in a world of people with shadows, while Kryz's job on a film set full of artifice may mirror the artificiality that he sees in everyday interaction. These flashbacks making up the bulk of the narrative puts the ostensible lead character, Officer, in a backseat-narrator position a la Nick in The Great Gatsby, with the ghosts' experiences also working to inform his emotional status. I feel that the form of a work of fiction should reflect the nature of its content in some way, and given that my subject matter is mental illness, it made sense to me to arrange the various stories in a fragmented fashion, taking inspiration from authors like Thomas Pynchon and Irvine Welsh, as well as the non-fiction book A Brief Introduction to Madness. Finally, I wanted to convey a sense of absurdity in the events of the story, again taking influence from these authors. In my experience and observation, depression and mania are often responses to a world that makes little sense, from people unable to cope with the reality around them. I feel this goes hand-in-hand with an absurdist view of the world, and hopefully the unrealistic details of these stories, and the way character treat them as normal, should convey a sense of bafflement for the reader.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

133969-Thumbnail Image.png

Paraprosdokian: A Short Story Collection

Description

Paraprosdokian is a collection of stories about all different types of lives in Phoenix, AZ. There are several stories that work together, involving lonely teenagers at punk house shows, while the rest standalone: the eclectic interactions of a waiter at

Paraprosdokian is a collection of stories about all different types of lives in Phoenix, AZ. There are several stories that work together, involving lonely teenagers at punk house shows, while the rest standalone: the eclectic interactions of a waiter at a 24-hour diner, a blind fair ride operator with a propensity for accidental murder, a hapless son of a clumsy dental assistant, a literary scholar stuck in an addiction to both Kafka and pornography, a kid who learns that writing is not a formula, and a high school death that nobody cares about. Some pieces unfold parts of 21st century culture that have been knotted in ambivalence, like how men raised on pornography reconcile with intimacy, while others are as simple as trying to encapsulate the experience of growing up in what is often perceived as an artless suburbia. The project aims at mixing prose with photography to create, as Ben Lerner describes it, “a constellation of language and image”—a complete artistic product. Using the work of a local Arizona photographer, the collection complicates a reader’s elementary notion of a “picture book” by forcing the reader to view photographs beyond exposition or symbolism. The title of the collection comes from a term used in comedic rhetoric that refers to a figure of speech in which the latter part of a statement or phrase reorients one’s understanding of the whole. Under this definition, the collection seeks to amend its author and reader’s orientation to Phoenix in a quest for empathy, giving pathetic characters a chance to speak without ever sacrificing a touch of humorous joy.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2018-05

136223-Thumbnail Image.png

The Importance of Slave Narratives: The Analysis of Jacob D. Green's Life

Description

Jacob D. Green's slave narrative breaks standards surrounding slave narratives and wrote a strong, unique story that allowed his audience to relate to his human characters. His narrative has unprecedented qualities that make his autobiography distinctive. An attempt to locate

Jacob D. Green's slave narrative breaks standards surrounding slave narratives and wrote a strong, unique story that allowed his audience to relate to his human characters. His narrative has unprecedented qualities that make his autobiography distinctive. An attempt to locate him in historical documents proved inconclusive and some of his stories elaborated, but his narrative is still a valuable piece of literature that gives historians a glimpse into slavery in the United States and the abolition movement in England.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05

Elektralite: A Novella

Description

Elektralite: A Novella is a creative project that documents the life and happenings of Lana Elektra, a young multi-million dollar heiress living in New York City. In the novella, Lana has found herself a little restless as a result of

Elektralite: A Novella is a creative project that documents the life and happenings of Lana Elektra, a young multi-million dollar heiress living in New York City. In the novella, Lana has found herself a little restless as a result of having so much money and time on her hands. Through trying to keep herself occupied, Lana meets a boy named Connor who attends college in the city. The two develop a dysfunctional relationship concerning emotions, money, and power. Connor begins to get incredibly comfortable with Lana's lifestyle, particularly the drug culture, while Lana begins to question her identity and the life created for her on account of her wealth and status. Both are forced to evaluate what they want in their lives and what lengths they are willing to go to in order to get it. Themes tackled within the novella include wealth, greed, identity, the nature of love, and the American Dream. Lana and Connor represent two opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of the American Dream, as one who was literally born in to the Dream and another who is working towards the Dream and desperately craves it. The characterization of Connor also comments on the nature of the American college system, and the debt that students accumulate in pursuit of an education. The novella is roughly 114 pages in length and has 8 chapters. The story is told in 3rd person perspective, mostly focusing on Lana but also spending some time on Connor's perspective as well.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05