Matching Items (15)

137111-Thumbnail Image.png

Discussion Based Education in a Civics Classroom

Description

This project is a one-semester U.S. government curriculum that centers on encouraging students to be active and engaged citizens while they learn civics and history content. The curriculum includes discussion

This project is a one-semester U.S. government curriculum that centers on encouraging students to be active and engaged citizens while they learn civics and history content. The curriculum includes discussion based instructional strategies that require students to analyze documents, understand the historical background of issues, and communicate ideas clearly and respectfully. These skills expose students to new ideas and allow them to develop arguments based on evidence. I designed the curriculum for a democratic classroom \u2014 one that provides students with more responsibility and ownership in the classroom and gives them a large role in developing classroom policies and procedures. Diana Hess (2009) argues that a democratic education pushes students to "do democracy" (p. 15). This participatory structure engages students and teaches them how to be active democratic citizens.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

136727-Thumbnail Image.png

On Thin Ice: A History of the Bankruptcy of the Phoenix Coyotes

Description

The Phoenix Coyotes entered bankruptcy and NHL stewardship in 2009 because of poor initial planning, short-sighted private ownership, and geographical constraints associated with the team's location in Glendale. The subsequent

The Phoenix Coyotes entered bankruptcy and NHL stewardship in 2009 because of poor initial planning, short-sighted private ownership, and geographical constraints associated with the team's location in Glendale. The subsequent sale process extended from 2009-2013 and included multiple potential suitors, municipal politics, and international finance as the NHL fought to keep the troubled franchise in Phoenix.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

147751-Thumbnail Image.png

Through a Lockean Lens: Analyzing the Influence of Locke and Montesquieu on Thomas Jefferson

Description

The influence of John Locke’s political philosophy on Thomas Jefferson is well-documented, from their shared belief in natural rights to their similar theories of property to their shared support of

The influence of John Locke’s political philosophy on Thomas Jefferson is well-documented, from their shared belief in natural rights to their similar theories of property to their shared support of religious freedom. As one of Jefferson’s “three greatest men,” Locke’s influence cannot be understated. The influence of Baron de Montesquieu is far more contested, but nonetheless Jefferson’s close study of Montesquieu and their shared belief in the character of republics and the necessity of education, among other things, provide clear evidence for Montesquieu’s influence. I propose that the dissonance between Montesquieu’s ideas and Jefferson’s adaptation and application of them result from Jefferson’s Lockean lens: a framework based on Locke’s ideas that so profoundly impacted Jefferson’s beliefs that he molded other philosopher’s ideas to conform to Locke. By analyzing the political writings of Locke, Montesquieu, and Jefferson, as well as some of Jefferson’s personal writing (in the form of letters and his Literary Commonplace Book) the influence of both philosophers and the framework Locke provides can be established. Understanding this framework helps us better understand the philosophical foundations of Thomas Jefferson’s politics, and by extension understand the philosophical foundations of American political thought.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

137383-Thumbnail Image.png

New Orleans and the Black Press: How New Orleans impacted Reconstruction Policy in America

Description

In the years after the American Civil War, New Orleans became an important city in regards to racial turmoil and political futures. Three separate riots, each taking place between the

In the years after the American Civil War, New Orleans became an important city in regards to racial turmoil and political futures. Three separate riots, each taking place between the years of 1866-1874, came to be defining moments in the greater pantheon of Reconstruction politics. Each of these riots had major impacts on the political climate of the day, with national implications that stretched far beyond just the city of New Orleans.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

147938-Thumbnail Image.png

Following the Narrative of the United States vs. Soviet Union Hockey Game in the 1980 Winter Olympics

Description

The 1980 Winter Olympic semi-final hockey game between the United States and Soviet Union changed the history of sporting events. The outcome took everyone by surprise, and it reinvigorated patriotism

The 1980 Winter Olympic semi-final hockey game between the United States and Soviet Union changed the history of sporting events. The outcome took everyone by surprise, and it reinvigorated patriotism in the United States. It was and forever will be known as a miracle. The hockey game has only grown in popularity due to movies, books, and articles reminiscing on one of the greatest sports upsets in history. The United States-Russia rivalry has been a strong one since the very beginning of sports. The United States has always tried to keep up with the Russian talent, but in 1980 they took the Soviets by surprise, at height of the cold war. Not only were they rivals in sports, but enemies at a profound political level. Over the years, the tensions between the two countries have diminished, but recently they have increased again. Although these tensions continue to rise, these countries are able to battle for the top seed through sports. This has been shown throughout the years with one of the main competitions being the 1980 Winter Olympics semi-final hockey game.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

136852-Thumbnail Image.png

A Palliation, A Lullaby: Assessing the Kansas-Nebraska Act

Description

Though extensively studied in the modern era, the Kansas-Nebraska crisis of the mid-1800s continues to evade being comprehended in its entirety. In this paper, the theories that have been proposed

Though extensively studied in the modern era, the Kansas-Nebraska crisis of the mid-1800s continues to evade being comprehended in its entirety. In this paper, the theories that have been proposed for why it occurred are presented. Subsequently, each known theory is analyzed for its strengths, weaknesses, and how it contributes to the understanding of the period. With this information in mind, I employ a historical diagram to propose ways that this cataclysmic event could have been avoided. However, by doing this, it also brings about unwelcome consequences. I leave it up to the reader to decide if the actual crisis or the presented alternative series of events would have been any better in avoiding civil war.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

137131-Thumbnail Image.png

Military Law and Mercy Killing in Iraq: The Case of Captain Roger Maynulet

Description

This thesis discusses the court-martial of Army Captain Rogelio "Roger" Maynulet and the public reaction to the trial. Maynulet's court-martial took place in 2005 for the mercy killing of an

This thesis discusses the court-martial of Army Captain Rogelio "Roger" Maynulet and the public reaction to the trial. Maynulet's court-martial took place in 2005 for the mercy killing of an Iraqi during his deployment in 2004. While in pursuit of Muqtada al-Sadr, who was considered a high value target, Maynulet killed the driver of the car which intelligence said al-Sadr was a passenger. Maynulet was convicted of voluntary manslaughter and dismissed from the military. The goal of this research is to show Maynulet was rightly convicted and delve into how public reaction reveals varied and divisive opinions toward mercy killing and military behavior.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

137022-Thumbnail Image.png

Membership and the Matching and Blessing for Second Generation Unificationists

Description

The second generation of the Unification Church, a New Religious Movement of the late twentieth century, must decide whether to be members under different circumstances than those facing the first

The second generation of the Unification Church, a New Religious Movement of the late twentieth century, must decide whether to be members under different circumstances than those facing the first generation. As Dr. James Grace studied in his 1985 book, Sex and Marriage in the Unification Movement: A Sociological Study, the Church's practice of arranged marriage directly contributed to the first generation's participation. I interview six "second gen" and their parents about their relationship to the Church and its marriage practices. By comparing the second gen interviews to Dr. Grace's results, I discover that the same centripetal factors that encouraged first generation participation can both encourage and discourage involvement among the second generation. Though a small sample, the six second gens' personal histories also suggest new trends in the evolving Church, like a rebellion against the stringent expectations of sexual and romantic abstinence and the continuing appeal of arranged marriage for atheist or less involved members. For such a small and fledgling movement the retention of members is essential to perpetuation, as is inheritance by the second generation of the Church's leadership. Understanding how the second generation may be retained or repelled allows us to understand the ways that the Unification Church is still a critique and rejection of American religion and romantic culture.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

137053-Thumbnail Image.png

From Fascism to Socialism: Liberalization and De-liberalization Trends of Abortion Policy of Spain

Description

Abstract: This project will examine the shifts in government abortion policy of Spain since World War II, in efforts to answer the causal question :Why has Spain so dramatically reversed

Abstract: This project will examine the shifts in government abortion policy of Spain since World War II, in efforts to answer the causal question :Why has Spain so dramatically reversed its abortion law mandates from one of the most liberal in Europe to one of the most restrictive? Spain's abortion policy is unique due to opposing forces between the Catholic Church and the socialist government and its universal health care policy. One must examine other historical and social factors to understand this policy. The purpose of this project is to understand how has the abortion policy of Spain (regarding its criminalization of women who receive abortion as well as those who perform them) changed over the last fifty years (approximately since the end of World War II). It will also examine what roles factors such as religion, culture, gender equality, and politics played in the development of these statures. Finally, the study will research the main groups that have been involved in this issue in the last fifty years and what their arguments are to support their opinions. Methods used to investigate this policy and its history of the criminalization of abortion policy in Spain since World War II will include a combination of literature review, government document review, and field research in Spain.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

137062-Thumbnail Image.png

JUST ONE OF THE GUYS? AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRINT-MEDIA COVERAGE JANET NAPOLITANO RECEIVED IN THE 2002 ARIZONA GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION

Description

This thesis analyzes the print-media coverage of female candidates for public office in Arizona. Former research has found that, historically, female candidates receive less overall coverage, less issue coverage, and

This thesis analyzes the print-media coverage of female candidates for public office in Arizona. Former research has found that, historically, female candidates receive less overall coverage, less issue coverage, and more coverage focused on appearance and family in comparison to their male counterparts. Such biased coverage has countless detrimental effects on female candidates in influencing the public's perception of their viability as candidates and their ability to perform in office. To explore how female candidates in Arizona are treated by their local print media, I specifically analyzed how the two largest newspapers in Arizona, The Arizona Republic and Arizona Daily Star, covered Janet Napolitano as a gubernatorial candidate in 2002. In the first chapter, I compared general election coverage of Napolitano to that of her male opponents Matt Salmon, Richard Mahoney, and Barry Hess. In the second chapter, I compared in-depth general election articles about Napolitano to in-depth general election articles about Jan Brewer during her campaign for governor in 2010. From the first chapter, then, I could analyze coverage differences between female and male candidates, and from the second chapter I could examine coverage differences between female candidates with very different lifestyles. In conjunction, these two chapters produced a broad picture of the media climate for female gubernatorial candidates in Arizona.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05