Matching Items (33)

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Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Silicon Clathrates for Use in Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

Description

Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most widely used energy storage solutions today. As renewable energy sources proliferate to meet growth in worldwide energy consumption, it is important that lithium-ion

Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most widely used energy storage solutions today. As renewable energy sources proliferate to meet growth in worldwide energy consumption, it is important that lithium-ion batteries be improved to help capture this energy for use when the demand arises. One way to boost the performance of lithium-ion batteries is to replace the electrode active materials with materials of higher specific capacity. Silicon is one material that has been widely touted as a potential replacement for the graphite used in commercial anodes with a theoretical capacity of 3500 mAh/g as opposed to graphite's 372 mAh/g. However, bulk silicon is known to pulverize after experiencing large strains during lithiation. Here, silicon clathrates are investigated as a potential structure for accommodation of these strains. Silicon clathrates consist of covalently bonded silicon host cages surrounding a guest alkali or alkaline earth metal ion. Previous work has looked at silicon clathrates for their superconducting and thermoelectric properties. In this study, electrochemical properties of type I and II silicon clathrates with sodium guest ions (NaxSi46 and NaxSi136) and type I silicon clathrates with copper framework substitution and barium guest ions (Ba8CuxSi46-x) are examined. Sodium clathrates showed very high capacities during initial lithiation (>2500 mAh/g), but rapidly lost capacity thereafter. X-ray diffraction after lithiation showed conversion of the clathrate phase to lithium silicide and then to amorphous silicon after delithiation, indicating destruction of the clathrate structure as a possible explanation for the rapid capacity fade. Ba8CuxSi46-x clathrates were found to have their structures completely intact after 50 cycles. However, they had very low reversible capacities (<100 mAh/g) and potentially might not be electrochemically active. Further work is needed to better understand exactly how lithium is inserted into clathrates and if copper impurities detected during wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy could be inhibiting lithium transport into the clathrates.

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  • 2014-05

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Ionic Liquid Corrosion of Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys

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In 2015, the United States consumed about 140.43 billion gallons of gasoline, resulting in the emission of over 1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to the U.S. Energy

In 2015, the United States consumed about 140.43 billion gallons of gasoline, resulting in the emission of over 1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Despite continued efforts to develop more efficient engines and cleaner fuels, a major barrier to reducing energy consumption and CO2 production is the mass of the vehicle. Replacing traditional automotive materials such as iron and steel with lighter-weight materials is a big step toward improving fuel economy. Magnesium has great potential for use in the automotive industry because of its low density, about 78% less than the density of steel, and high strength-to-weight ratio. Using cast magnesium instead of steel can reduce the overall weight of a vehicle, improving performance and increasing fuel efficiency. However, magnesium’s high susceptibility to corrosion limits its feasibility as a substitute for traditional materials.

This project aimed to understand the effects of composition and phase distribution on the corrosion behavior of magnesium-aluminum (Mg-Al) alloys in an ionic liquid electrolyte. The purpose of studying corrosion in nonaqueous ILs is to determine the anodic dissolution behaviors of the alloy phases without the interference of side reactions that occur in aqueous electrolytes, such as di-oxygen or water reduction. Three commercial Mg-Al alloys were studied: AZ91D (9% Al), AM60 (6% Al), and AZ31B (3% Al). An annealed alloy containing solid-solution α-phase Mg-Al with 5 at% aluminum content (Mg5Al) was also used. The ionic liquid chosen for this project was 1:2 molar ratio choline-chloride:urea (cc-urea), a deep eutectic solvent. After potentiostatic corrosion in cc-urea, the magnesium alloys were found to form a high surface area porous morphology as corrosion duration increased. This morphology consists of aluminum-rich ridges formed by Al nanowires surrounding an aluminum-poor base area, but with an overall increase in surface Al composition, indicating selective dealloying of the Mg in cc-urea and redistribution of the Al on the surface. Further work will focus on the development of hydrophobic coatings using ionic liquids.

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  • 2016-05

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The Effect of Cu3Au Parent Phase Crystallography on Nanoporous Gold Morphology

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In this research, the effect of the crystal structure of the parent phase on the morphology of nanoporous gold is explored. Specifically, Cu-Au alloys are studied. For this experiment, Cu0.75Au0.25

In this research, the effect of the crystal structure of the parent phase on the morphology of nanoporous gold is explored. Specifically, Cu-Au alloys are studied. For this experiment, Cu0.75Au0.25 is heat treated to achieve an ordered phase Cu3Au and a disordered random solid solution, face centered cubic, Cu0.75Au0.25 phase, which are then dealloyed to form nanoporous gold (NPG). Using a morphology digital image analysis software called AQUAMI, SEM images of the NPG morphology were characterized to collect data on the ligament length, ligament diameter, porosity size, etc. of the samples. It was determined that the NPG formed from the ordered parent phase had an average ligament diameter that was 10 nm larger than the NPG formed from the disordered parent phase. This may be due to the ordered crystal structure allowing for faster gold diffusion and coarsening resulting in an increased average ligament size. Further future work is needed in order to obtain further evidence to support this hypothesis.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Crack Injection as a Mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking

Description

Traditionally nanoporous gold is created by selective dissolution of silver or copper from a binary silver-gold or copper-gold alloy. These alloys serve as prototypical model systems for a phenomenon

Traditionally nanoporous gold is created by selective dissolution of silver or copper from a binary silver-gold or copper-gold alloy. These alloys serve as prototypical model systems for a phenomenon referred to as stress-corrosion cracking. Stress-corrosion cracking is the brittle failure of a normally ductile material occurring in a corrosive environment under a tensile stress. Silver-gold can experience this type of brittle fracture for a range of compositions. The corrosion process in this alloy results in a bicontinuous nanoscale morphology composed of gold-rich ligaments and voids often referred to as nanoporous gold. Experiments have shown that monolithic nanoporous gold can sustain high speed cracks which can then be injected into parent-phase alloy. This work compares nanoporous gold created from ordered and disordered copper-gold using digital image analysis and electron backscatter diffraction. Nanoporous gold from both disordered copper-gold and silver-gold, and ordered copper-gold show that grain orientation and shape remain largely unchanged by the dealloying process. Comparing the morphology of the nanoporous gold from ordered and disordered copper-gold with digital image analysis, minimal differences are found between the two and it is concluded that they are not statistically significant. This reveals the robust nature of nanoporous gold morphology against small variations in surface diffusion and parent-phase crystal structure.
Then the corrosion penetration down the grain boundary is compared to the depth of crack injections in polycrystal silver-gold. Based on statistical comparison, the crack-injections penetrate into the parent-phase grain boundary beyond the corrosion-induced porosity. To compare crack injections to stress-corrosion cracking, single crystal silver-gold samples are employed. Due to the cleavage-like nature of the fracture surfaces, electron backscatter diffraction is possible and employed to compare the crystallography of stress-corrosion crack surfaces and crack-injection surfaces. From the crystallographic similarities of these fracture surfaces, it is concluded that stress-corrosion can occur via a series of crack-injection events. This relationship between crack injections and stress corrosion cracking is further examined using electrochemical data from polycrystal silver-gold samples during stress-corrosion cracking. The results support the idea that crack injection is a mechanism for stress-corrosion cracking.

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  • 2020

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Three dimensional characterization of microstructural effects on spall damage in shocked polycrystalline copper

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Shock loading is a complex phenomenon that can lead to failure mechanisms such as strain localization, void nucleation and growth, and eventually spall fracture. The length scale of damage with

Shock loading is a complex phenomenon that can lead to failure mechanisms such as strain localization, void nucleation and growth, and eventually spall fracture. The length scale of damage with respect to that of the surrounding microstructure has proven to be a key aspect in determining sites of failure initiation. Studying incipient stages of spall damage is of paramount importance to accurately determine initiation sites in the material microstructure where damage will nucleate and grow and to formulate continuum models that account for the variability of the damage process due to microstructural heterogeneity, which is the focus of this research. Shock loading experiments were conducted via flyer-plate impact tests for pressures of 2-6 GPa and strain rates of 105/s on copper polycrystals of varying thermomechanical processing conditions. Serial cross sectioning of recovered target disks was performed along with electron microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), focused ion beam (FIB) milling, and 3-D X-ray tomogrpahy (XRT) to gain 2-D and 3-D information on the spall plane and surrounding microstructure. Statistics on grain boundaries (GB) containing damage were obtained from 2-D data and GBs of misorientations 25° and 50° were found to have the highest probability to contain damage in as-received (AR), heat treated (HT), and fully recrystallized (FR) microstructures, while {111} Σ3 GBs were globally strong. The AR microstructure’s probability peak was the most pronounced indicating GB strength is the dominant factor for damage nucleation. 3-D XRT data was used to digitally render the spall planes of the AR, HT, and FR microstructures. From shape fitting the voids to ellipsoids, it was found that the AR microstructure contained greater than 55% intergranular damage, whereas the HT and FR microstructures contained predominantly transgranular and coalesced damage modes, respectively. 3-D reconstructions of large volume damage sites in shocked Cu multicrystals showed preference for damage nucleation at GBs between adjacent grains of a high Taylor factor mismatches as well as an angle between the shock direction and the GB physical normal of ~30°-45°. 3-D FIB sectioning of individual voids led to the discovery of uniform plastic zones ~25-50% the size of the void diameter and plastic deformation directions were characterized via local average misorientation maps. Incipient transgranular voids revealed from the sectioning process were present in grains of high Taylor factors along the shock direction, which is expected as materials with a low Taylor factor along the shock direction are susceptible to growth due their accomodation of plastic deformation. Fabrication of square waves using photolithography and chemical etching was developed to study the nature of plasticity at GBs away from the spall plane. Grains oriented close to <0 1 1> had half the residual amplitudes than grains oriented close to <0 0 1>.

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  • 2015

Synthesis and in situ characterization of nanostructured and amorphous metallic films

Description

Nanocrystalline (nc) thin films exhibit a wide range of enhanced mechanical properties compared to their coarse-grained counterparts. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior and microstructure of nc films is intimately related.

Nanocrystalline (nc) thin films exhibit a wide range of enhanced mechanical properties compared to their coarse-grained counterparts. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior and microstructure of nc films is intimately related. Thus, precise control of the size, aspect ratio and spatial distribution of grains can enable the synthesis of thin films with exceptional mechanical properties. However, conventional bottom-up techniques for synthesizing thin films are incapable of achieving the microstructural control required to explicitly tune their properties. This dissertation focuses on developing a novel technique to synthesize metallic alloy thin films with precisely controlled microstructures and subsequently characterizing their mechanical properties using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Control over the grain size and distribution was achieved by controlling the recrystallization process of amorphous films by the use of thin crystalline seed layers. The novel technique was used to manipulate the microstructure of structural (TiAl) and functional (NiTi) thin films thereby exhibiting its capability and versatility. Following the synthesis of thin films with tailored microstructures, in situ TEM techniques were employed to probe their mechanical properties. Firstly, a novel technique was developed to measure local atomic level elastic strains in metallic glass thin films during in situ TEM straining. This technique was used to detect structural changes and anelastic deformation in metallic glass thin films. Finally, as the electron beam (e-beam) in TEMs is known to cause radiation damage to specimen, systematic experiments were carried out to quantify the effect of the e-beam on the stress-strain response of nc metals. Experiments conducted on Al and Au films revealed that the e-beam enhances dislocation activity leading to stress relaxation.

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  • 2017

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Effect of rolling induced anisotropy on fatigue crack initiation and short crack propagation in Al 2024-T351

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A full understanding of material behavior is important for the prediction of residual useful life of aerospace structures via computational modeling. In particular, the influence of rolling-induced anisotropy on fatigue

A full understanding of material behavior is important for the prediction of residual useful life of aerospace structures via computational modeling. In particular, the influence of rolling-induced anisotropy on fatigue properties has not been studied extensively and it is likely to have a meaningful effect. In this work, fatigue behavior of a wrought Al alloy (2024-T351) is studied using notched uniaxial samples with load axes along either the longitudinal or transverse direction, and center notched biaxial samples (cruciforms) with a uniaxial stress state of equivalent amplitude about the bore. Local composition and crystallography were quantified before testing using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and Electron Backscattering Diffraction. Interrupted fatigue testing at stresses close to yielding was performed on the samples to nucleate and propagate short cracks and nucleation sites were located and characterized using standard optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results show that crack nucleation occurred due to fractured particles for longitudinal dogbone/cruciform samples; while transverse samples nucleated cracks by debonded and fractured particles. Change in crack nucleation mechanism is attributed to dimensional change of particles with respect to the material axes caused by global anisotropy. Crack nucleation from debonding reduced life till matrix fracture because debonded particles are sharper and generate matrix cracks sooner than their fractured counterparts. Longitudinal samples experienced multisite crack initiation because of reduced cross sectional areas of particles parallel to the loading direction. Conversely the favorable orientation of particles in transverse samples reduced instances of particle fracture eliminating multisite cracking and leading to increased fatigue life. Cyclic tests of cruciform samples showed that crack growth favors longitudinal and transverse directions with few instances of crack growth 45 degrees (diagonal) to the rolling direction. The diagonal crack growth is attributed to stronger influences of local anisotropy on crack nucleation. It was observed that majority of the time crack nucleation is governed by the mixed influences of global and local anisotropies. Measurements of crystal directions parallel to the load on main crack paths revealed directions clustered near the {110} planes and high index directions. This trend is attributed to environmental effects as a result of cyclic testing in air.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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An in situ Surface Stress Study of Electrochemical Phenomena: Electrodeposition and Molecular Adsorption

Description

Over the last decade copper electrodeposition has become the dominant process by which microelectronic interconnects are made. Replacing ultra-high vacuum evaporative film growth, the technology known as the Cu damascene

Over the last decade copper electrodeposition has become the dominant process by which microelectronic interconnects are made. Replacing ultra-high vacuum evaporative film growth, the technology known as the Cu damascene process has been widely implemented in the microelectronics industry since the early 2000s. The transition from vacuum film growth to electrodeposition was enabled by solution chemistries that provide "bottom-up" or superfilling capability of vias and trenches. While the process has been and is used widely, the actual mechanisms responsible for superfilling remain relatively unknown. This dissertation presents and discusses the background and results of experimental investigations that have been done using in situ electrochemical surface stress monitoring techniques to study the evolution of stress on Cu{111} thin film electrodes. Because of its extreme sensitivity to the structure on both the electrode and solution sides of the interface, surface stress monitoring as analytical technique is well suited for the study of electrodeposition. These ultra-high resolution stress measurements reveal the dynamic response of copper electrodes to a number of electrochemical and chemical experimental variables. In the case of constant current pulsed deposition and stripping, the surface stress evolution depends not only on the magnitude of the current pulse, but also shows a marked response to plating bath composition. The plating bath chemistries used in this work include (1) additive free, (2) deposition suppressing solutions that include polyethylene glycol (PEG) and sodium chloride (NaCl) as well as (3) full additive solution combinations which contain PEG, NaCl, and a one of two deposition accelerating species (bis-(sodiumsulfopropyl)disulfide (SPS) or mercaptopropane sulfonic acid (MPS)). The development of thin film stress is further investigated through a series of solution exchange experiments that correlate the magnitude of electrode exchange current density and the stress state of the film. Remarkably, stress changes as large as ~8.5 N/m are observed during solution exchanges at the open circuit potential. Overall, this research demonstrates that solution chemistry can have a large impact on thin film stress evolution, even for very small deposition thicknesses (e.g. <10 ML) or in the absence of net addition or removal of material from the electrode.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Morphology evolution during dealloying at high homologous temperature

Description

Dealloying, the selective electrochemical dissolution of an active component from an alloy, often results in nanoscale bi-continuous solid/void morphologies. These structures are attracting attention for a wide range of applications

Dealloying, the selective electrochemical dissolution of an active component from an alloy, often results in nanoscale bi-continuous solid/void morphologies. These structures are attracting attention for a wide range of applications including catalysis, sensing and actuation. The evolution of these nanoporous structures has been widely studied for the case at low homologous temperature, TH, such as in Ag-Au, Cu-Au, Cu-Pt, etc. Since at low TH the solid-state mobility of the components is of order 10-30 cm2s-1 or less, percolation dissolution is the only mechanism available to support dealloying over technologically relevant time scales. Without the necessity of solid-state mass transport, percolation dissolution involves sharp transitions based on two key features, the parting limit and critical potential.

Dealloying under conditions of high TH, (or high intrinsic diffusivity of the more electrochemically reactive component) is considerably more complicated than at low TH. Since solid-state mass transport is available to support this process, a rich set of morphologies, including negative or void dendrites, Kirkendall voids and bi-continuous porous structures, can evolve. In order to study dealloying at high TH we have examined the behavior of Li-Sn and Li-Pb alloys. The intrinsic diffusivities of Li were measured in these alloys using electrochemical titration and time of flight measurements. Morphology evolution was studied with varying alloy composition, host dimension and imposed electrochemical conditions. Owing to diffusive transport, there is no parting limit for dealloying, however, there is a compositional threshold (pPD) as well as a critical potential for the operation of percolation dissolution and the formation of bi-continuous structures. Negative or void dendrite morphologies evolve at compositions below pPD and at large values of the applied electrochemical potential when the rate of dealloying is limited by solid-state mass transport. This process is isomorphic to dendrite formation in electrodeposition. Kirkendall voiding morphologies evolve below the critical potential over the entire range of alloy compositions.

We summarize our results by introducing dealloying morphology diagrams that we use to graphically illustrate the electrochemical conditions resulting in various morphologies that can form under conditions of low and high TH.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Effect of foreign object damage on fatigue of inconel 718 at elevated temperature (1050 °C)

Description

The use of solar energy to produce power has increased substantially in the past few decades. In an attempt to provide uninterrupted solar power, production plants may find themselves having

The use of solar energy to produce power has increased substantially in the past few decades. In an attempt to provide uninterrupted solar power, production plants may find themselves having to operate the systems at temperatures higher than the operational capacity of the materials used in many of their components, which affects the microstructural and mechanical properties of those materials. Failures in components that have been exposed to these excessive temperatures have been observed during operations in the turbine used by AORA Solar Ltd. A particular component of interest was made of a material similar to the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718), which was observed to have damage that is believed to have been initiated by Foreign Object Damage (FOD) and worsened by the high temperatures in the turbine. The potential links among the observed failure, FOD and the high temperatures of operation are investigated in this study.

IN718 is a precipitation hardened nickel superalloy with resistance to oxidation and ability to withstand high stresses over a wide range of temperatures. Several studies have been conducted to understand IN 718 tensile and fatigue properties at elevated temperatures (600- 950°C). However, this study focuses on understanding the behavior of IN718 with FOD induced by a stream of 50 μm Alumina particles at a velocity of 200 m/s. under high cycle fatigue at an elevated temperature of 1050 °C. Tensile tests were conducted for both as-received and heat treated (1050 °C in air for 8hrs) samples at room and high temperature. Fatigue tests were performed at heat treated samples at 1050 °C for samples with and without ablation. The test conditions were as similar as possible to the conditions in the AORA turbine. The results of the study provide an insight into tensile properties, fatigue properties and FOD. The results indicated a reduction in fatigue life for the samples with ablation damage, where crack nucleation occurred either at the edge or inside the ablation region and multisite cracking was observed under far field stresses that were the same than for pristine samples, which showed single cracks. Fracture surfaces indicate intergranular fracture, with the presence of secondary cracks and a lack of typical fatigue features, e.g., beach marks which was attributed to environmental effects and creep.

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Date Created
  • 2017