Matching Items (29)

137690-Thumbnail Image.png

Pio Fedi's The Rape of Polyxena: A Greek Legendary Scene In Nineteenth-Century Italian Sculpture

Description

The Rape of Polyxena is a marble statue located in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy's Piazza della Signoria. It was sculpted by Pio Fedi in 1868, but it

The Rape of Polyxena is a marble statue located in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy's Piazza della Signoria. It was sculpted by Pio Fedi in 1868, but it was placed alongside several sculptures from the Renaissance, an immense compliment to his work. The Rape of Polyxena embodies Hellenistic, Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassicist mannerisms regarding its style and theme. Fedi intricately blended multiple styles and stories in order to construct The Rape of Polyxena. The most prominent literary sources of the Greek legend concerning Polyxena are Ovid's Metamorphoses, Euripides' Hecuba, and Bocaccio's Famous Women. This project discusses the various sources of the scene presented and the different sculptures that may have inspired Fedi to create his work. This thesis explores the reason behind the sculpture's placement in the prestigious Loggia dei Lanzi and concludes that Fedi does not adhere to any singular source of the myth, but takes elements from different sources in order to create a new story.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

135313-Thumbnail Image.png

An Analysis of the Characteristics and Causes of Textile Production in the Bronze Age Palatial Economy

Description

This thesis assesses the existence of an advanced textile production industry, which existed in Minoan and Mycenaean societies throughout the Bronze Age. This is proved based on physical remains as

This thesis assesses the existence of an advanced textile production industry, which existed in Minoan and Mycenaean societies throughout the Bronze Age. This is proved based on physical remains as well as literary and tablet sources. These pieces of evidence show the movement and use of raw weaving materials as recorded and controlled by central palace structures. Palaces would have acted at the collectors of the raw goods and would have contained the workshops needed to produce the final product. The motives behind this industry are disputed, however the could include needing textiles for warfare, religious rituals, to supply the local population, or to enable the lifestyles of the elite.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

136456-Thumbnail Image.png

Attacking Iraq: The New York Times' Coverage of the Looting of Iraqi Antiquities

Description

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as examples of this horrific consequence. From 1990 to 2014 there have been four major cases of looting in Iraq: the Iraqi regional museums in 1991, archaeological sites throughout the 1990's, the National Museum of Iraq in April 2003, and Iraqi archaeological sites starting in 2003. During this time period, The New York Times reported 84 articles about the status of Iraqi antiquities. Interestingly, the newspaper focused 62 of the articles on the looting of the National Museum of Iraq and subsequent recovery efforts. In this thesis, I will evaluate factors such as subject, article length, word choice, author, paper section, date, accuracy of information, and other relevant influences to determine differences in coverage between the different instances of Iraqi cultural heritage looting. The factors will demonstrate that the marketable qualities of the story, availability of information, and danger of location are some of the factors that led to the disproportional reporting by The New York Times.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

133476-Thumbnail Image.png

Changing perspectives of Tempe's historic San Pablo barrio: A qualitative textual analysis of expressions of sense of place and meaning

Description

For this project, I use qualitative textual analysis to compare the differences and/or similarities between (1) how the former residents of Tempe’s historic San Pablo barrio (1872-1955) conveyed their sense

For this project, I use qualitative textual analysis to compare the differences and/or similarities between (1) how the former residents of Tempe’s historic San Pablo barrio (1872-1955) conveyed their sense of place, meaning, and displacement in oral and written histories and (2) how Tempe’s Anglo residents at the time of San Pablo’s occupation and dissolution conveyed their sense of the place, meaning, and displacement of San Pablo in newspaper articles. I have located my investigation of any perceived or lacking disparities between how these two groups perceived San Pablo’s place and meaning within the context of San Pablo’s dissolution and the displacement of its residents in the mid 1950s. As I follow the process through which some communities are able to suppress, take over, and erase others from dominant narratives and political decisions without any perceived consequences, I will bring to the foreground the emotional impact of place and displacement in order to highlight how the former residents of ‘erased’ communities make sense of and respond to their displacement.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

149736-Thumbnail Image.png

The museum, the flâneur, and the book: the exhibitionary complex in the work of Henry James

Description

The Victorian era was the age of museum development in the United States. In the wake of these institutions, another important figure of the nineteenth century emerged--the flâneur. The flâneur

The Victorian era was the age of museum development in the United States. In the wake of these institutions, another important figure of the nineteenth century emerged--the flâneur. The flâneur represents the city, and provided new mechanisms of seeing to the public. The flâneur taught citizens how to gaze with a panoptic eye. The increasing importance of cultural institutions contributed to a new means of presenting power and interacting with the viewing public. Tony Bennett's exhibitionary complex theory, argues that nineteenth-century museums were institutions of power that educated, civilized, and through surveillance, encourage self-regulation of crowds. The flâneur's presence in the nineteenth century informed the public about modes of seeing and self-regulation--which in turn helped establish Bennett's theory inside the museum. The popular writing and literature of the time provides an opportunity to examine the extent of the exhibitionary complex and the flâneur. One of the most prominent nineteenth-century authors, Henry James, not only utilizes museums in his work, but he often uses them in just the manner Bennett puts forth in his theory. This is significant because the ideas about museums in James's work shaped the minds of an expanding literary public in the United States, and further educated, civilized, and regulated readers. James also represents the flâneur in his writing, which speaks to broader cultural implications of the both exhibitionary complex on the outside world, and the effects of broader cultural influences on the museum. Beyond the impact of James's work, in the late nineteenth century American culture increasingly became centered around the printed word. The central position of books in American culture at the end of the nineteenth century allowed books and libraries to appropriate the exhibitionary complex and become tools of power in their own right. The book and the library relate to the museum as part of a larger cultural environment, which emerged as a result of modernity and a response to the ever-changing nineteenth-century world.  

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

149764-Thumbnail Image.png

Italian antiquities in America: contextualizing repatriation

Description

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and U.S. institutions modeled themselves after this example. In the 20th century, defining cultural property, in the form of excavated objects, became a priority for many nations and resulted in the scrutiny of ancient artifacts, in particular. This led to the establishment of international protocols which sought to protect items during times of both peace and war. Despite international legislation, the trade of illicit antiquities continued. A major advocate for repatriation, the nation of Italy aggressively sought return of many objects from antiquity and recently approached the Metropolitan Museum of Art regarding several items whose provenance was suspect. Ultimately the conflict was resolved through The Metropolitan Museum of Art-Republic of Italy Agreement of February 21, 2006, which transferred the title of six antiquities to Italy in return for long term loans of equivalent objects to the museum. The landmark agreement represents a mutually profitable resolution to a situation potentially plaguing thousands of institutions worldwide. The implications of replication of the agreement can potentially change how museums, nations and the public understand concepts of ownership and may reduce the role of permanent collections in favor of sharing, rather than possessing, world heritage.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

151858-Thumbnail Image.png

Re-simulating an artificial view: contemporary western American landscape photography

Description

Western landscape photography helped to create an imaginative perception of a new nation for Americans. Early nineteenth-century photographers captured a vision of uncharted terrain that metaphorically fulfilled a two-fold illusion:

Western landscape photography helped to create an imaginative perception of a new nation for Americans. Early nineteenth-century photographers captured a vision of uncharted terrain that metaphorically fulfilled a two-fold illusion: an untouched Eden and a land ready and waiting for white settlement. The sublime and picturesque experiences of the West provided artists a concept that could be capitalized upon by employing various forms of manipulation. In the twentieth-century, the role of landscape photography evolved as did the advancement of the West. Images of wilderness became art and photographers chose to view the western landscape differently. Some focused more sharply and critically on the relationship between the land and the people who lived on it. The influential exhibition in 1975, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape presented work that showed a landscape altered, marked by power lines, houses, and fences. The West as Eden no longer existed. Today, photographers continue to examine, image, and experience western land anew. In this thesis I examine the relationship of contemporary landscape photography and the role of the West, guided by an analysis that traces the history of American ideologies and attitudes toward natural land. The artists I have chosen recognize landscape not as scenery but as the spaces and systems people inhabit, and use manipulative strategies that emphasize an artificial character of the West. Their work elicits antecedent mythologies, pictorial models, and American ideologies that continue to perpetuate internationally.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

151799-Thumbnail Image.png

Marginalia of the Geese book: inside and outside the borders

Description

The early-16th-century manuscript commonly known as the Geese Book (New York, Morgan Library, M. 905) contains the entire Mass liturgy sung by the boys choir of the parish church of

The early-16th-century manuscript commonly known as the Geese Book (New York, Morgan Library, M. 905) contains the entire Mass liturgy sung by the boys choir of the parish church of St. Lorenz in Nuremberg, Germany prior to the Reformation. This thesis addresses the location and function of the sometimes enigmatic marginalia and the decorated or historiated initials in this large two-volume gradual. The paper begins with an analytical case study of a scene within the margins in which a wild woman, wielding a club, confronts a female dragon who has taken a child. Subsequently the size, subject matter, and physical positioning of the illuminations and decorations within the book and on its pages are examined with respect to the gradual's liturgical contents. It is hoped that through such methods, new conversations may begin as to the roles that marginalia and decoration may play within the multiple organizational schemes within a musical text of this kind.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

152371-Thumbnail Image.png

Quliaqtuavut tuugaatigun (Our stories in ivory): reconnecting Arctic narratives with engraved drill bows

Description

This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill

This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill bows formed an ideal surface on which to recount life events and indigenous epistemologies reflective of distinct environmental and socio-cultural relationships. Carvers added motifs over time and the presence of multiple hands suggests a passing down of these objects as a form of familial history and cultural patrimony. Explorers, traders and field collectors to the Bering Strait eagerly acquired engraved drill bows as aesthetic manifestations of Arctic mores but recorded few details about the carvings resulting in a disconnect between the objects and their multi-layered stories. However, continued practices of ivory carving and storytelling within Bering Strait communities holds potential for engraved drill bows to animate oral histories and foster discourse between researchers and communities. Thus, this collaborative project integrates stylistic analyses and ethno-historical accounts on drill bows with knowledge shared by Alaska Native community members and is based on the understanding that oral narratives can bring life and meaning to objects within museum collections.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

152199-Thumbnail Image.png

Entering sacred ground: public history at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Description

Baseball is the quintessential American game. To understand the country one must also understand the role baseball played in the nation's maturation process. Embedded in baseball's history are (among other

Baseball is the quintessential American game. To understand the country one must also understand the role baseball played in the nation's maturation process. Embedded in baseball's history are (among other things) the stories of America's struggles with issues of race, gender, immigration, organized labor, drug abuse, and rampant consumerism. Over the better part of two centuries, the national pastime both reflected changes to American culture and helped shape them as well. Documenting these changes and packaging them for consumption is the responsibility of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. Founded as a tourist attraction promoting largely patriotic values, in recent decades the Baseball Hall of Fame made a concerted effort to transform itself into a respected member of the history museum community--dedicated to displaying American history through the lens of baseball. This dissertation explores the evolution of the Baseball Hall of Fame from celebratory shrine to history museum through an analysis of public history practice within the museum. In particular, this study examines the ways the Hall both reflected and reinforced changes to American values and ideologies through the evolution of public history practice in the museum. The primary focus of this study is the museum's exhibits and analyzing what their content and presentation convey about the social climate during the various stages of the Baseball Hall of Fame's evolution. The principal resources utilized to identify these stages include promotional materials, exhibit reviews, periodicals, and photographic records, as well as interviews with past and present Hall-of-Fame staff. What this research uncovers is the story of an institution in the midst of a slow transition. Throughout the past half century, the Hall of Fame staff struggled with a variety of obstacles to change (including the museum's traditionally conservative roots, the unquestioning devotion Americans display for baseball and its mythology, and the Hall of Fame's idyllic setting in a quaint corner of small-town America) that undermined their efforts to become the type of socially relevant institution many envisioned. Contending with these challenges continues to characterize much of the museum's operations today.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013