Matching Items (4)

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A Journey: American Indian Behavioral Health Programs Building Culturally Competent Clinical Skills and Adapting Evidence-Based Treatments

Description

There are federal mandates attached to funding for behavioral health programs that require the use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) to treat mental health disorders in order to improve clinical outcomes.

There are federal mandates attached to funding for behavioral health programs that require the use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) to treat mental health disorders in order to improve clinical outcomes. However, these EBTs have not been constructed with American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) populations. There are over 340 EBTs, and only two outcome controlled studies have demonstrated effectiveness with AI/AN populations to treat mental health disorders. AI/AN communities often have to select an EBT that is not reflective of their culture, language, and traditions. Although EBTs are frequently used in AI/AN communities, little is known about the adaptation process of these interventions with the AI/AN population. For this study, a qualitative design was used to explore how American Indian behavioral health (AIBH) organizations in the Southwest adapted EBTs for cultural relevancy and cultural appropriateness. One urban and two tribal AIBH programs were recruited for the study. Over a six-week period, 24 respondents (practitioners and cultural experts) participated in a semi-structured interview. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative analysis approach. As a result, four themes emerged: 1) attitudes towards EBTs, 2) how to build culturally competent clinical skills, 3) steps to adapt EBTs, and 4) internal and external organizational factors required to adopt EBTs. The four themes identify how to build a culturally responsive behavioral health program in Indian country and are the purview of this dissertation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Exploring Intersections of Identity and Service Provision Among LGBTQ Young Adults: A Participatory Action Research Approach

Description

This study explores the ways in which LGBTQ young adults describe the aspects of their identities, and how those identities shape their service needs and experiences. A participatory action research

This study explores the ways in which LGBTQ young adults describe the aspects of their identities, and how those identities shape their service needs and experiences. A participatory action research component was explored as a research and service approach that is sensitive to LGBTQ young people living at the intersections of multiple identities. Although it is understood that LGBTQ young people come from a variety of backgrounds, research is limited in its understanding and exploration of how aspects of identity, such as race and class, influence the lives and service needs of this population. The data was collected through an initial set of interviews with fifteen LGBTQ-identified young adults ages 18 to 24. The interviewees were recruited from an LGBTQ youth-serving organization using a purposive sampling approach to reflect racial/ethnic and gender identity diversity. Following the interviews, eight of the participants engaged as co-researchers on a participatory action research (PAR) team for sixteen weeks. The process of this team's work was assessed through a reflective analysis to identify factors that impacted the participants' lives. Analysis of the interviews identified key themes related to identity among the LGBTQ young people. The interviewees experienced a multiplicity of identities that were both socially and individually constructed. These identities were impacted by their immediate and social environments. The young people also identified ways that they used their identities to influence their environments and enhance their own resilience. The service experiences and needs of the LGBTQ young people in this study were directly influenced by their multiple identities. Implications for intersectional approaches to serving this population are explored. Analysis of the PAR process identified four areas in which the young people were most impacted through their work and interactions with one another: relationships, communication, participation, and inclusion. Implications for research and service approaches with LGBTQ young people are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Nonparental child care during nonstandard hours: who uses it and how does it influence child well-being?

Description

Over the last three decades there has been a rise in the number of workers employed during nonstandard (evening and overnight) hours; accompanying this trend has been a renewed interest

Over the last three decades there has been a rise in the number of workers employed during nonstandard (evening and overnight) hours; accompanying this trend has been a renewed interest in documenting workers, their families, and outcomes associated with nonstandard-hour employment. However, there are important gaps in the current literature. Few have considered how parents who work nonstandard hours care for their children when parental care is unavailable; little is known about who participates in nonparental child care during nonstandard hours, or the characteristics of those who participate. Most pressingly from a policy perspective, it is unclear how participation in nonparental child care during nonstandard hours influences child well-being. This study aims to fill these gaps. This dissertation paints a descriptive portrait of children and parents who use nonstandard child care, explores the relationship between nonstandard hours of nonparental child care participation and various measures of child well-being, and identifies longitudinal patterns of participation in nonstandard-hour child care. I find that children who participate in nonstandard-hours of nonparental child care look significantly different from those who do not participate. In particular, children are more likely to be older, identify as black or Hispanic, and reside with younger, unmarried parents who have lower levels of education. Estimates also suggest a negative relationship between participation in nonstandard-hour child care and child well-being. Specifically, children who participate in nonstandard-hour care show decreased school engagement and school readiness, increased behavioral problems, decreased social competency, and lower levels of physical health. These findings have serious implications for social and education policy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Exploring parenting attitudes and parental risk of child maltreatment among youth aging out of Arizona's foster care system

Description

There are a number of factors known to influence the occurrence of child maltreatment, including parental history of child maltreatment. Youth aging out of the foster care system have been

There are a number of factors known to influence the occurrence of child maltreatment, including parental history of child maltreatment. Youth aging out of the foster care system have been shown to experience a number of challenges associated with the transition to adulthood, including early unintended pregnancy and parenting. However, despite the presumed risks associated with being in foster care and having a history of child maltreatment, very little research has been conducted to examine the parenting attitudes among youth aging out. This study explored the parenting attitudes and parental risk of child maltreatment among youth aging out of foster care in Arizona and examined the relationship between relational support and parenting. Foster youths' parenting attitudes and parental risk of child maltreatment across five constructs: parental expectations, parental empathic awareness of children's needs, beliefs regarding the use of corporal punishment, parent-child roles, and children's power and independence were assessed. Linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between youths' perceived social support from friends, family, and significant others and their parenting attitudes and youths' current living arrangements and their parenting attitudes. Findings indicate that youth had lower than the median normed sample scores on two out of the five parenting constructs, parental empathic awareness of children's needs and parent-child roles. Overall, 17% of youth in the sample were considered high risk of child maltreatment as parents, while 79% were considered medium risk. Perceived social support from friends was significantly associated with higher scores regarding youths' attitudes about the use of corporal punishment and children's power and independence. Youth living with foster parents had significantly higher scores than youth living on their own across three out of the five parenting attitude constructs. Youth living with relatives had higher scores than youth living on their own on the empathic awareness of children's needs parenting construct. Findings suggest that youth may rely on friends for social support and may develop more nurturing parenting attitudes if residing with foster parents or relatives. Implications for policy, intervention, and practice are discussed.  

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014