Matching Items (3)

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The Development of a Comfortable Myoelectric Prosthetic Socket \u2014 Fishbone

Description

This paper proposes a new socket design to complement Project Fishbone, a design project focused on creating a lightweight transradial prosthetic device. The socket has a simple concept of introducing

This paper proposes a new socket design to complement Project Fishbone, a design project focused on creating a lightweight transradial prosthetic device. The socket has a simple concept of introducing perforations on the surface of the socket using cost effective, and rapid manufacturing methods such as vacuum thermoforming and drilling. The perforations on the socket allows for greater air ventilation to the prosthetic user's residual skin thus reducing the temperature within the socket. There were nine primary design iterations that were tested: 0.125, 0,187, 0.25-inch-thick designs, and 3/16, 15/64, 17/64-inch perforation sizes, and 12, 18 and 24 count of perforations. Initial test was done using the sockets of different thickness without any perforations to check for uniformity in design and manufacturing method using a regression test. It was found that an increase in thickness directly related to an increase in temperature cooling time. The temperature cooling test was run using a three-factor DOE method and no clear interaction between the factors was observed, thus the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test along with the post hoc Mann-Whitney test to check for significance among the factors as well as significance of groups within the factors. Statistical significance (p<0.05) was found in the socket thickness and size of perforations. Additionally, significance (p<0.02) was found in the 0.125 and 0.187-inch thickness and the 3/16-inch size perforations. Based on the significance between each group, the best combination for increased cooling time reduction was thus found to be with the 0.125-inch thick HDPE sheet and 3/16-inch sized perforation while the number of perforations did not make much difference. These results proved the concept of this new socket design that could be implemented into existing upper limb prosthetic systems.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Soft Robotic Haptic Interface with Variable Stiffness for Rehabilitation of Neurologically Impaired Hand Function

Description

The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because

The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because of the plasticity of the central nervous system to relearn and remodel the lost synapses in the brain. Current rehabilitation therapies focus on strengthening motor skills, such as grasping, employ multiple objects of varying stiffness so that affected persons can experience a wide range of strength training. These devices have limited range of stiffness due to the rigid mechanisms employed in their variable stiffness actuators. This paper presents a novel soft robotic haptic device for neuromuscular rehabilitation of the hand, which is designed to offer adjustable stiffness and can be utilized in both clinical and home settings. The device eliminates the need for multiple objects by employing a pneumatic soft structure made with highly compliant materials that act as the actuator of the haptic interface. It is made with interchangeable sleeves that can be customized to include materials of varying stiffness to increase the upper limit of the stiffness range. The device is fabricated using existing 3D printing technologies, and polymer molding and casting techniques, thus keeping the cost low and throughput high. The haptic interface is linked to either an open-loop system that allows for an increased pressure during usage or closed-loop system that provides pressure regulation in accordance to the stiffness the user specifies. Preliminary evaluation is performed to characterize the effective controllable region of variance in stiffness. It was found that the region of controllable stiffness was between points 3 and 7, where the stiffness appeared to plateau with each increase in pressure. The two control systems are tested to derive relationships between internal pressure, grasping force exertion on the surface, and displacement using multiple probing points on the haptic device. Additional quantitative evaluation is performed with study participants and juxtaposed to a qualitative analysis to ensure adequate perception in compliance variance. The qualitative evaluation showed that greater than 60% of the trials resulted in the correct perception of stiffness in the haptic device.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12-20

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The Design and Characterization of a Soft Haptic Interface for Rehabilitation of Impaired Hand Function

Description

The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because

The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because of the plasticity of the central nervous system to relearn and remodel the lost synapses in the brain. Current rehabilitation therapies focus on strengthening motor skills, such as grasping, employ multiple objects of varying stiffness and devices that are bulky, costly, and have limited range of stiffness due to the rigid mechanisms employed in their variable stiffness actuators. This research project presents a portable cost-effective soft robotic haptic device with a broad stiffness range that is adjustable and can be utilized in both clinical and home settings. The device eliminates the need for multiple objects by employing a pneumatic soft structure made with highly compliant materials that act as the actuator as well as the structure of the haptic interface. It is made with interchangeable soft elastomeric sleeves that can be customized to include materials of varying stiffness to increase or decrease the stiffness range. The device is fabricated using existing 3D printing technologies, and polymer molding and casting techniques, thus keeping the cost low and throughput high. The haptic interface is linked to either an open-loop system that allows for an increased pressure during usage or closed-loop system that provides pressure regulation in accordance with the stiffness the user specifies. A preliminary evaluation is performed to characterize the effective controllable region of variance in stiffness. Results indicate that the region of controllable stiffness was in the center of the device, where the stiffness appeared to plateau with each increase in pressure. The two control systems are tested to derive relationships between internal pressure, grasping force exertion on the surface, and displacement using multiple probing points on the haptic device. Additional quantitative evaluation is performed with study participants and juxtaposed to a qualitative analysis to ensure adequate perception in compliance variance. Finally, a qualitative evaluation showed that greater than 60% of the trials resulted in the correct perception of stiffness in the haptic device.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018