Matching Items (94)

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Residential Choice’s Impact on Sustainable Transportation Options: A Study in the Phoenix Metro Area

Description

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process.

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process. We also noticed that “commute” means different things to different households, and that many people did not consider their commute to work to be a primary factor determining their final home location. Moreover, many people were willing to increase their commute time, or trade access to desirable amenities for a longer commute. Commuting time to work was one example of the tradeoffs that homeowners make when choosing a home, but there were also others such as architectural type and access to neighborhood amenities. Lastly, time constraints proved to be a very significant factor in the home buying process. Several of our households had such strict time constraints that limited their search to a point of excluding whole areas. Overall, our study sheds light on transportation’s role in residential choice and underscores the complexity of the location choice process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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A Story of Resettlement

Description

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to bring this project to fruition. This refugee inspired us to show the personal side of the issue of resettlement and we believed that she would be able to make an impact on others if we could share her story. The purpose of this project was to record this refugees story of resettlement in America. As mentioned above, we wanted to share their powerful journey from Rwanda to America. We believed that by introducing a personal story to a relatively impersonal matter we would bring more understanding to this issue. We wanted to create a project that could not only be a source of education, but also have a personal aspect that would inspire many to learn more and get involved with issues that are important to them. We believed creating this short film would be the best way we could have this story reach more people. Over these seven months, we created a short film that told the story of the Rwandan genocide and the American resettlement process from the unique perspective of someone who has experienced both.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Transforming Public Space Toolkit

Description

The purpose of this public space toolkit is to provide the knowledge people need to transform public spaces within their community. Public spaces are a major part of cities that

The purpose of this public space toolkit is to provide the knowledge people need to transform public spaces within their community. Public spaces are a major part of cities that people use everyday. The problem is that many open public spaces, like vacant lots, are not effectively used. Meanwhile, communities face issues including social isolation, food scarcity, etc. Therefore, transforming public spaces using community gardens will help address these matters. Methods used for this toolkit include using research databases, examining scholarly journals, and using primary experiences to navigate topics. Results show that there are numerous social benefits obtained when public space management strategies and best practices are properly implemented. This toolkit outlines the strategies and guidelines to consider when starting a garden and what has been proven to be effective for other gardens.
These gardens facilitate community development, build social capital, and address food insecurity. Local Phoenix community gardens, Phoenix Renews and The TigerMountain Foundation, are analyzed. The TigerMountain Foundation was able to demonstrate the power of Asset Based Community Development and how community gardens provided a way for people to invest in their community and gain skills. The Phoenix Renews garden showed the importance of selecting the right space for a garden, and the downsides when certain considerations are not made. Conclusively, community garden can be a catalyst for people to transform their communities. This tool kit provides a starting point, with the knowledge and background information, for people to improve their communities through transforming public space using community gardens.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Sustainability Practices and Motivations of Hostels Located in Tourist Destinations In the U.S. and Europe

Description

The emphasis of this research is on the level of environmental and social sustainability in hostels located in top tourist destinations in the U.S. and Europe and the motivations of

The emphasis of this research is on the level of environmental and social sustainability in hostels located in top tourist destinations in the U.S. and Europe and the motivations of hostel proprietors in implementing sustainable practices. The related research is limited in terms of hostels; however, there are impactful studies in terms of sustainability initiatives and hoteliers perceptions of sustainable tourism that contributed to the development of this study. Additionally, research studies on the behaviors of the backpacking community provided necessary background in analyzing data on the hostel community. A 20 question survey was emailed to a total of 454 email addresses to hostels located in 29 popular tourist destinations in both the U.S. and Europe. This study found that out of the 24 completed responses, hostels in the U.S. had a higher level of implementation of sustainability practices than those in Europe, Hostels with a sustainability strategic plan ranked higher in levels of sustainability practices. Lastly, the study pinpointed selected implemented practices that positively correlated with hostels attitudes and perceptions of sustainability. However, with the limited number of participants this study is not statistically significant. There is an opportunity for future research to expand upon the implications of hostel community and sustainability.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Exploring management values, attitudes, and behaviors toward green practices in the urban hotel industry

Description

Environmental friendly, green, or sustainable practices are a growing concern in the international hospitality industry. This exploratory study seeks to assess the complex motives that drive hotels on becoming environmentally

Environmental friendly, green, or sustainable practices are a growing concern in the international hospitality industry. This exploratory study seeks to assess the complex motives that drive hotels on becoming environmentally active by examining the benefits and barriers for hotels to adapt sustainable practices. With this assessment, the study strives to identify small measures the less environmentally active hotels can adapt to their daily operations. An initial study was first conducted in international hotels located in Beijing, China, as international hotels are considered more environmentally proactive and their standards are in keeping with the latest industry trends. The preliminary findings suggested that environmental participation may be affected by the age, size and management structure of the hotel. The actual study, which was conducted in three cities across Arizona, United States, took into account of the initial analysis and looked at both large chain hotels and smaller independents hotels located in urban areas. A quantitative and qualitative research methodology using a questionnaire along with an interview was used to collect the data. The findings show that the decision for hotels to implement environmental practices goes beyond the financial and operational sphere. The results point to the role played by political and upper management policies and how their decisions trickle down to the entire organization. Although unexpectedly, there seemed little influence linking customer satisfaction and the hotel’s environmental commitment. Instead, hotels tend to focus their efforts mainly on backroom operations as opposed to measures that directly impact the consumer experience. It is recommended that hotels increase employee and customer awareness of its environmental policies and reveal the statistic impact of each.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad Public Relations Campaign

Description

Dance studios often have a high tuition rates, which makes learning technique from a dance school difficult to attain. For AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad no circumstance can keep them

Dance studios often have a high tuition rates, which makes learning technique from a dance school difficult to attain. For AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad no circumstance can keep them from dancing. This 14-year-old team has made their mark in dance competitions nationwide. The only problem is: this nationally ranked team lingers unrecognized. AZ Hype is a non-profit dance team that practices wherever they can find a space. They practice anywhere from school cafeterias to driveways, parks to backyards and parking lots. What gives this team their competitive edge is that nothing keeps them from dancing and they draw inspiration from outside of the walls of a studio. The team consists of 18 to 30 dancers each year and is divided into two age groups; a junior and senior team. The dancers range from six to 25 years of age. The team has one coach, one stereo and a room full of trophies and championship banners. The coach, Tara Delgado, is a 5th grade history teacher who has been coaching AZ Hype for 14 consecutive years. She continues to teach and inspire kids in the Valley. Though years go by her personal dance skills and creativity to choreograph and mix music strengthens and improves. She is more than just a dance coach to the kids who make her house their home. A public relations campaign for AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad was created to benefit the team in many ways. For the duration of the team's existence, they did not have a website, social media management, community support, sponsors, practice space, or any news media connections. The goal of the campaign is to gain exposure but also gather sponsors to lift the burdening costs of competitions, uniforms and practice spaces. The plan would serve as an outline to utilize social media, reach out to local media and contact various dance and youth supporters. In this campaign, testimonials have been gathered to uncover the true need and impact of the dance team. Without schools teaching dance or other performing arts, many youths lose out on the opportunity to ever learn. In addition to research, collateral material will be made and used for marketing and information as well as a strategic fundraising and branding plan. This plan will encourage and help implement the transition from a group of dancers to a 501c(3) nonprofit.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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FOIA: The Lock and Key to Government Records

Description

The Freedom of Information Act (1966), an amendment altering Section Three of the Administrative Procedure Act (1964), outlines the rules and regulations for United States citizens to obtain federal government

The Freedom of Information Act (1966), an amendment altering Section Three of the Administrative Procedure Act (1964), outlines the rules and regulations for United States citizens to obtain federal government records. The act, written with the guidance of journalists, was created for all members of the public, but with the intent that the press would be the primary users of the legislation. The authors of the act believed the press would utilize FOIA to enhance its ability to accomplish its duty of keeping the public informed. Now, 51 years after the act was passed into law, critics say FOIA has not satisfactorily allowed the press or the public in general to inform and be informed. Issues with demand rates, unorganized systems and subjective interpretations of the act have combined to lock information from public access through an act that was intended to be the key to it. The data from annual federal agency FOIA reports to the attorney general from 2008 to 2015 have indicated that, in multiple metrics, FOIA has increasingly struggled to fulfill and often has failed to provide records to requesting parties. These trends have inspired a discussion among journalists and right-to-information advocates about how to best resolve the issues that have contributed to them. Proposed solutions range from adjustments to requesters' approaches to the act, amendments to the act and even abandoning the act entirely in favor of constructing a new law.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Analyzing Communication Strategies and Brand Perception at Arizona State University

Description

Starting in 2002, Arizona State University (ASU) began a rebranding effort to transition from having a reputation as a top 10 party school to being known as a prestigious research

Starting in 2002, Arizona State University (ASU) began a rebranding effort to transition from having a reputation as a top 10 party school to being known as a prestigious research institution. Over the last 15 years, ASU has successfully reached some of these goals, eventually being named the #1 most innovative university in the country by the U.S. News and World Report. Part of this success can be attributed to the university's communication and marketing efforts, which seek to improve the university's reputation and build relationships with stakeholders. This study analyzes ASU's communication entities, how they interact and what messages they push out to stakeholders, particularly in regards to the #1 in innovation award. Primary research in this study looked at keywords used by different stakeholder groups affiliated with ASU, how they viewed ASU's reputation and how they receive communication from the university. Overall, the closer the relationship with ASU, the more positively the respondent viewed the university. Perception also varied based on geographic location and proximity to the university. Innovation is clearly a key brand perception of ASU from stakeholders, and the party school image is still persistent among those not affiliated with the university.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Exploring Students' Engagement With and Construction of Community

Description

Sense of Community is related to numerous positive outcomes for university students. The purpose of this study was to explore sense of community amongst low income students who received a

Sense of Community is related to numerous positive outcomes for university students. The purpose of this study was to explore sense of community amongst low income students who received a last dollar scholarship. This study also sought to understand how students define community and how they interact with communities from their past (before university), present (since they started college), and how they envision their future community involvement after graduation. Through purposive sampling, six low income Arizona State University students were selected based on similar characteristics. The scholarship that they belong to selects them based on financial need, integrity, and prolonged commitment to community service. Using a qualitative narrative inquiry, I interviewed participants about their understanding and experiences with communities. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Based on the analysis, I identified three major themes: community as construction, community as nonlinear, and community as intersectional. Drawing from participants' definitions and experiences of community, I argue that community is a construction. In other words, individuals create their own constructions of community, and their actions vary based on that construction. Participants also experience their communities intersectionally, that is individual's experience their communities as coexisting and through multiple community perspectives, rather than as a single stand-alone entity. Finally, community does not exist as part of a linear time paradigm. Instead community is experienced in terms of relevance to the individual in creating meaning from that community. In addition to the above themes, I also examined participant perspectives of ASU as a community. Based on this research, I recommend that a platform be provided for students to engage in a dialogue about their understanding of community and interactions with communities. Moreover, I suggest researchers utilize intersectionality, constructionism, and non-linear time to frame future research on sense of community. This research is significant because it helps us understand student engagement, and offers a framework through which universities can provide students an opportunity to better understand their own sense of community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Social Enterprises: What Allows them to be Successful

Description

Social enterprises strive to tackle social problems, improve the lives of the people around them and help create a sustainable environment. Three specific enterprises will be analyzed to illustrate the

Social enterprises strive to tackle social problems, improve the lives of the people around them and help create a sustainable environment. Three specific enterprises will be analyzed to illustrate the differences between management styles, mission, financials and overall successes. There are numerous social enterprises in the southwest of the United States of America, some show more success than others, but what separates them? What commonalities do some of these enterprises share that allow them to be more successful than the rest? Is there a common denominator for enterprises to follow that will allow them to have success financially as well as accomplish their goals to better the community around them? Free Arts for Abused Children or Arizona, Seed Spot and Goodmans, we are able to better distinguish what factors allow enterprises to succeed. Due to the nature of social enterprises being able to be qualified as different types of organizations, i.e., company with shareholders, nonprofit organizations, etc. it is difficult to pin point a concrete model social enterprises should follow today. However, a finding that made all three of these social enterprises successful were their governance and ownership structures. Each enterprise consisted of a board that helped the enterprise stay on track with their given mission. Boards are also responsible for making major decisions that can impact the organization as well as being responsible for fundraising and making various financial decisions. After analyzing their structures, it was evident that all three enterprises consisted of strong governance structures. Although enterprises may not be able to follow a distinct model in order to be successful, they are able to place a board in control that aligns with the social enterprises mission and has a variety of knowledge that allows the board to make sound decisions. Keywords: social enterprise, management, governance, success, mission, financials

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12