Matching Items (61)

Labyrinths

Description

Labyrinths is my Capstone/Honors Creative Project, blending my proclivity for music composition and the inspiring stories of Jorge Luis Borges. Originally, the project was outlined as a collection of five

Labyrinths is my Capstone/Honors Creative Project, blending my proclivity for music composition and the inspiring stories of Jorge Luis Borges. Originally, the project was outlined as a collection of five to eight songs named for and based on stories in Borges' collection Labyrinths, to be written, recorded, and performed by me. Over time other aspects were included, making me a director of a large-scale creative project which now included three other musicians and two artists. In this paper, I give a brief overview of Borges' life and the context surrounding his collection Labyrinths, an in-depth description of the project as a whole, liner notes for each song, credits, and three appendices. The liner notes are broken into four sections: a summary of the story, an analysis of the story and my interpretation of it (including my musical ideas for the resulting song), an effects list, and performance notes which include the text I read from each story in the performance and recordings. The first appendix is a collection of the sheet music scores for each song and the text document I used for the performance readings. The second appendix shows the art I was given permission to use, and how I modified them for my thesis. The third appendix contains my primary sources, secondary sources/suggested readings, and suggested websites and videos. Attached are the recordings of each song I made in Logic Pro 9, a video of the live performance, and an unedited audio recording of the same performance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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More than Teachers: A Study of How Band Directors Handle Student Grief

Description

Three high-school and college-level band directors were interviewed about how their ensemble students (both individually and collectively) are affected during times of tragedy and how they responded to the situation.

Three high-school and college-level band directors were interviewed about how their ensemble students (both individually and collectively) are affected during times of tragedy and how they responded to the situation. Tragedies discussed included student deaths, school-wide incidents, national emergencies, and other instances of shared grief. Questions that guided the research were: (1) In what musical or non-musical ways do band directors aid their students in the grieving process? (2) How do band directors handle their own personal emotions, both in front of their students and privately? and (3) What resources and previous experiences have prepared band directors to handle a grief situation, and what additional methods may have prepared them more effectively? Interviews were qualitatively analyzed for common themes and compared with literature related to responding to student grief. Four main themes emerged from the study: (1) contextual factors affect stakeholders' responses, (2) band directors make many decisions when handling student grief, (3) band directors recall responses of the wider community, and (4) band directors experience personal impact. Implications for the field included suggestions for band directors to consider non-musical student needs in their orientations to teaching, for the band director community to communicate about student grief situations, and for social workers and administrators to ensure that classroom teachers receive training and information on how to help students with grief. Recommendations for further research included replicating the study with other demographic areas, examining the students' experiences themselves, conducting a survey-based study about the topic, and exploring the role mentors have in shaping band directors' philosophies on this topic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Compositions for Piano and Strings

Description

The result of hundreds of hours of work is a few minutes of music. I am mechanical engineering student with a passion for music. The objective of this creative project

The result of hundreds of hours of work is a few minutes of music. I am mechanical engineering student with a passion for music. The objective of this creative project was to learn as much as I could about music theory, composition, orchestration, notation, recording, and mixing, and to create some music of my own. I learned a great deal in my two semesters of work. My music was focused on small ensembles of strings and piano. I created over ten hours of musical audio sketches and produced notation for four pieces for the piano and strings. The finished scores fit together with similar tones and textures, all sharing a minor tonality. The first piece, "Little Machine," is a simple, methodical piano piece created in the style of second species counterpoint. The second piece, "Searching" is a duet between a piano and a cello. For most of the piece, the two instruments share a rhythmic sense of mutual independence, yet neither part can exist without the either. "Something Lost" is a piano solo written with a variety of sections and a unifying idea that pervades through the piece. Finally, "3 Strings & Piano" is a melancholy adagio written for the piano, two cellos, and a double bass. Overall, this project has helped to prepare me for a lifetime of continued learning and composition. In the future I will continue to write music, and I hope to specifically learn more about the tools and techniques used by professionals in the industry so that I can find more efficient ways to produce my own music.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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E-Strings Academy: An Interactive Online Resource Center for the 21st Century String Musician

Description

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students outside of the physical string classroom and to engage first-year string students in musical activities at home that supplement the instruction they receive in a school setting. The current website features five different areas for students to explore: lesson videos, tunes, listening activities, games, and resources. In each area, students have the opportunity to learn and reinforce musical concepts and skill sets that they will need in order to be successful in music, both in their first year of playing and beyond. I created E-Strings Academy with the intention that I use it with my own string students in my future teaching career. It is a flexible website that I will continue to revise, adapt, and enhance to best serve the needs of my students and enrich their musical learning outside of the classroom.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Jamaican Folk Music: In the General Music Classroom

Description

Jamaican folk music is categorized into three large genres, which may be broken down into smaller more specific subgenres. Work and Social Music (which includes Work Songs, Mento Music, and

Jamaican folk music is categorized into three large genres, which may be broken down into smaller more specific subgenres. Work and Social Music (which includes Work Songs, Mento Music, and Social Music), Recreational Music, and Ritual and Ceremonial Music. Rastafarianism, although it is a manifestation of ritual music, is given its own section due to the large amount of information available on the subject. Included here are historical analysis of the genres, as well as musical examples. Eight folk songs are included, and four drum patterns. This paper is intended as a resource for music educators, and therefore each song includes a Quick Reference Page, which lists solfege, rhythmic motives, genre of song, and if applicable drum rhythms which may be used to accompany the song. In addition, each song includes specific information regarding appropriate performance practice and suggestions for use in the classroom.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Recording For Teachers

Description

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and classroom teachers have various reasons for wanting to record their students, such as hearing what is being produced in rehearsals and having students reflect on their own performance and musical progress. Teachers may desire to record their students, but they may not know how to do so. Simple recording tools such as cell phones do not produce quality recordings, and unless they have specialized training, teachers may not be familiar with other kinds of recording equipment or how they can set up equipment in order to obtain a good quality recording. I searched for resources on recording equipment and techniques, but I could not find a single source that teachers could consult to learn about the basics of recording equipment and techniques. Teachers have limited time and may also have limited financial resources. The purpose of my project was to create a free and easy-to-use resource for teachers to answer their questions on recording and give them the tools that they need in order to get started with making basic, high quality recordings. The research process included research about different kinds of recording hardware and software, documenting recording techniques for different settings and instruments, and interviewing teachers about their needs. The product that that resulted from this project is a website, Recording For Teachers (https://sites.google.com/view/recordingforteachers/). This website features information about recording equipment, the recording process, how to produce shareable files, and an interactive means of posting questions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

A Guide to Coaching Color Guard

Description

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there are four sub-components.

The first is a historical research paper titled “The History and Evolution of Color Guard within Marching Band”. This paper defines what color guard is, identifies its origins, and outlines the major events that contributed to its development over time, leading up to what the sport and art of color guard has evolved into today.

The second component is a paper titled “Coaching Color Guard: My Experiences with Planning, Teaching, and Building a High School Color Guard Program”, which is a summarization of how a season of coaching color guard can be organized and examples of various learning opportunities a color guard coach could take advantage of during a season. Many education-specific teaching strategies are explained, such as the use of modeling, I do - we do - you do, whole-part-whole, scaffolding, sequencing from simple to complex, direct instruction vs. small groups, teaching to various learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), instructor/peer/group feedback, assessment, and opportunities for student contribution and creativity.

The third component is paper titled “Color Guard Coaching Resources”, which is made up of ten different documents that are examples or resources for color guard instructors. These resources are referenced in the second component of this project and include samples of flyers, audition scoring sheets, a student handbook, participation sheet, and written choreography as well as providing a list of other outside resources as well as a list of the video tutorials.

These video tutorials are the final component of this project. There are 44 tutorial videos broken up into five categories. Each video is a step-by-step teaching video demonstrating and articulating how to spin a color guard flag. The first category consists of 10 introductory videos, which discuss terms and concepts that are overarching in all of the tutorial videos. Then, there are 23 tutorials within the category titled ‘Basic Moves’. The next category of ‘Intermediate Moves’ consists of 5 teaching videos for moves that are more difficult to execute than the basic moves. The fourth category has 5 video tutorials for ‘Tosses’. The last category is called ‘Move Sequences’ and only has 1 video. This tutorial shows how some moves have similar rotation patterns and can easily be strung together to create a choreography sequence.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Navigating Cultural Difference in Gospel Music Study and Performance

Description

The meanings and values that people assign to music and the material culture that music creation offers make excellent data sources for uncovering new and transformative aspects of culture. Gospel

The meanings and values that people assign to music and the material culture that music creation offers make excellent data sources for uncovering new and transformative aspects of culture. Gospel music is a subculture that emphasizes a unique performance style, and is based upon culturally specific religious, social, musical, and historical contexts. Students in the ensemble who musically developed through a Western classical-based connective strand may experience some adjustment from what they know and develop new skills to navigate across cultural difference. The purpose of this study was to document how participants in a specific university gospel choir setting navigated across cultural differences for gospel choir study and performance. Participants were recruited and interviewed a total of three times about their experience in the ensemble. Questions that guided the study focused on three areas: religious difference, social difference, and musical difference. An in-case analysis of each participant showed that overall, experiences in the choir were positive. Participants from a variety of diverse backgrounds approached new cultural learning differences such as physical movement, aural music learning, religious text, and performance context with an open mind and an individualized way of navigating through difference. In order for participants to reach a point where they felt that they had cultural competency in a new musical area, in this case, the establishment of a strong community was especially essential because of the assumptions attached to this ensemble and because of many of the participants' initial limited understanding of cultural markers for learning music that draw on improvisatory and aural means. This study implies that there are connections between each cultural difference that are related. For the educator intending to introduce new cultural competencies in their classrooms, considering the dynamics in which cultural differences might interact with each other is essential.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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High school band students' attitudes toward teacher turnover

Description

The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a reliable and valid measure of secondary student attitudes toward band teacher turnover using the Thurstone (1928) equal-appearing interval scale as

The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a reliable and valid measure of secondary student attitudes toward band teacher turnover using the Thurstone (1928) equal-appearing interval scale as a model, and (b) to administer this measurement tool to determine attitudes of high school band students toward teacher turnover. This procedure included collecting statements about an imagined teacher turnover from students in the population (N = 216) and having student judges (N = 95) sort the statements into eleven categories based on how positive, neutral, or negative, each statement was perceived. The judging results were then analyzed, and 29 statements were selected for inclusion in the final survey, which was completed by students (N = 521) from 10 randomly selected high schools in Arizona. Student responses were analyzed and compared by the independent variables of gender, grade level, and band teacher turnover experience, to determine if significant differences existed. Results indicated that the overall students' attitudes toward teacher turnover are neutral. One significant difference was found in the slightly positive attitudes of students in the year immediately following a band teacher turnover. This only lasts a year, as students in the second year of a teacher turnover were found to have comparable attitudes to students who have not experienced a new teacher transition. Findings also suggest seniors may have a different perspective than other students toward teacher turnover.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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The impact of changing teaching jobs on music teacher identity, role, and perceptions of role support

Description

This study utilized symbolic interaction as a framework to examine the impact of mobility on four veteran elementary general music teachers' identities, roles, and perceptions of role support. Previous

This study utilized symbolic interaction as a framework to examine the impact of mobility on four veteran elementary general music teachers' identities, roles, and perceptions of role support. Previous research has focused on teacher identity formation among preservice and novice teachers; veteran teachers are less frequently represented in the literature. Teacher mobility research has focused on student achievement, teachers' reasons for moving, and teacher attrition. The impact of mobility on veteran teachers' identities, roles, and perceptions of role support has yet to be considered. A multiple case design was employed for this study. The criteria for purposeful selection of the participants were elementary general music teachers who had taught for at least ten years, who had changed teaching contracts and taught in at least two different schools, and who were viewed as effective music educators by fine arts coordinators. Data were collected over a period of eight months through semi-structured interviews, email correspondence, observations, review of videotapes of the participants' teaching in previous schools, and collection of artifacts. Data were analyzed within and across cases. The cross-case analysis revealed themes within the categories of identity, role, and role support for the participants. The findings suggest that the participants perceived their music teacher roles as multi-dimensional. They claimed their core identities remained stable over time; however, shifts in teacher identity occurred throughout their years as teachers. The participants asserted that mobility at the start of their careers had a positive impact because they each were challenged to solidify their own teacher identities and music teacher roles in varied school contexts. Mobility negatively impacted role and teacher practices during times when the participants adjusted to new school climates and role expectations. Role support varied depending upon school context, and the participants discovered active involvement in the school community was an effective means of seeking and acquiring role support. Reflection experiences in music teacher preparation programs, as well as mentoring and professional development geared toward teacher identity formation and role maturation, may assist teachers in matching their desired school context with their teacher identities and perceptions of the music teacher role.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011