Matching Items (3)

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Standardization of the Gordon Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece

Description

The purpose of this study was to standardize the Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece (N = 1,188). Split-halves reliability was acceptable across grade levels (K through 3) for

The purpose of this study was to standardize the Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece (N = 1,188). Split-halves reliability was acceptable across grade levels (K through 3) for the Tonal and Rhythm subtests, but test-retest reliability was generally unacceptable, especially for the Rhythm subtest. Concurrent validity was mixed, with teacher ratings of musical achievement generally significantly correlated with Tonal but not Rhythm subtest scores. Composite test means were significantly higher for suburban and urban samples than for rural samples and were significantly higher for higher grade levels. Item difficulty coefficients were significantly correlated across grade levels. The Greek and U.S. composite means were similar except for a significantly higher U.S. mean for grade 1. However, when the rural subgroup was removed from the Greek sample to equate with the U.S. norming sample, there were nonsignificant differences from grades K through 1, but significant differences in favor of the Greek sample for grades 3 and 4.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-04

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Membership of the Music Educators National Conference from 1912-1938: A Demographic and Economic Analysis

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between the membership of the Music Supervisors National Conference/Music Educators National Conference (MENC) from 1912-1838 and selected demographic and economic variables.

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between the membership of the Music Supervisors National Conference/Music Educators National Conference (MENC) from 1912-1838 and selected demographic and economic variables. The results include the following:

1. MENC membership grew considerably more rapidly than the nation's general and teacher
    populations.
2. Membership and membership as a percentage of the population differed significantly between
    MENC divisions.
3. Membership correlated with mean teacher salaries and with per capita education spending by
    state.
4. Membership by state correlated only slightly with geographical distance to convention sites. 
5. Women comprised a significant majority of the membership in each division, but a smaller
    majority than in the nation's teaching profession as a whole.
6. Implementation of the MENC"s biennial convention plan did not affect membership totals
    significantly.

We speculate that MENC membership as a percentage of music education may have differed between MENC divisions, and that such membership differences may have resulted from regional identification or other cultural factors not examined in this study. We recommend further application of quantitative sociological research techniques and cultural research approaches to the study of past and present practices in music and music education.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 1998-06

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The Effects of Instruction on Self-Assessed Research Knowledge, Ability, and Interest Among Greek Music Educators

Description

This study investigated the effects of a training seminar and selected background variables on Greek music teachers’ attitudes and self-evaluation regarding research. Public school, university, and conservatory teachers (n=41) participated

This study investigated the effects of a training seminar and selected background variables on Greek music teachers’ attitudes and self-evaluation regarding research. Public school, university, and conservatory teachers (n=41) participated in 16 hours of seminar instruction over a two-week period at a Greek university. The seminar provided an introduction to empirical research methods, testing, and basic statistical concepts and, procedures and an overview of music aptitude testing and the administration of selected tests. There was no significant pre-seminar difference in self-assessed interest and ability in research between participants who had and had not taken a prior research course. However, participants with prior training scored significantly higher on self-assessed knowledge of selected research concepts. A mixed-model analysis of variance indicated that the seminar instruction was effective in improving self-assessed research knowledge and interest, and that those with previous research training improved more than those without such training.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2007