Matching Items (29)

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Pio Fedi's The Rape of Polyxena: A Greek Legendary Scene In Nineteenth-Century Italian Sculpture

Description

The Rape of Polyxena is a marble statue located in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy's Piazza della Signoria. It was sculpted by Pio Fedi in 1868, but it

The Rape of Polyxena is a marble statue located in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy's Piazza della Signoria. It was sculpted by Pio Fedi in 1868, but it was placed alongside several sculptures from the Renaissance, an immense compliment to his work. The Rape of Polyxena embodies Hellenistic, Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassicist mannerisms regarding its style and theme. Fedi intricately blended multiple styles and stories in order to construct The Rape of Polyxena. The most prominent literary sources of the Greek legend concerning Polyxena are Ovid's Metamorphoses, Euripides' Hecuba, and Bocaccio's Famous Women. This project discusses the various sources of the scene presented and the different sculptures that may have inspired Fedi to create his work. This thesis explores the reason behind the sculpture's placement in the prestigious Loggia dei Lanzi and concludes that Fedi does not adhere to any singular source of the myth, but takes elements from different sources in order to create a new story.

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  • 2013-05

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Virtuous Vixens: The Erotic Depiction of Icons of Chastity in Renaissance Art

Description

This thesis focuses on the erotic depictions of Lucretia and Susanna in Renaissance art. Both noted for displaying exemplary chastity, Lucretia and Susanna gained popularity as Christian and secular role

This thesis focuses on the erotic depictions of Lucretia and Susanna in Renaissance art. Both noted for displaying exemplary chastity, Lucretia and Susanna gained popularity as Christian and secular role models for women in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. My examination of the heroines addresses the seductive portrayal of these women in painting, which seemingly contradicts the essence of their celebrity. The images specifically analyzed in this thesis include: Lucas Cranach the Elder's Lucretia from 1525, Lucretia from 1533, and Venus from 1532 as well as Tintoretto's Susanna and the Elders and Annibale Carracci's Susanna and the Elders. The scope of my thesis includes both textual and visual analyses of the myths/figures and the disparity that arises between them. Employing Lucretia and Susanna as examples, my aim is to demonstrate a subtle subversion occurring within images of powerful women that ultimately strips them of their power.

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  • 2013-05

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An Analysis of the Characteristics and Causes of Textile Production in the Bronze Age Palatial Economy

Description

This thesis assesses the existence of an advanced textile production industry, which existed in Minoan and Mycenaean societies throughout the Bronze Age. This is proved based on physical remains as

This thesis assesses the existence of an advanced textile production industry, which existed in Minoan and Mycenaean societies throughout the Bronze Age. This is proved based on physical remains as well as literary and tablet sources. These pieces of evidence show the movement and use of raw weaving materials as recorded and controlled by central palace structures. Palaces would have acted at the collectors of the raw goods and would have contained the workshops needed to produce the final product. The motives behind this industry are disputed, however the could include needing textiles for warfare, religious rituals, to supply the local population, or to enable the lifestyles of the elite.

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  • 2016-05

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Attacking Iraq: The New York Times' Coverage of the Looting of Iraqi Antiquities

Description

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as examples of this horrific consequence. From 1990 to 2014 there have been four major cases of looting in Iraq: the Iraqi regional museums in 1991, archaeological sites throughout the 1990's, the National Museum of Iraq in April 2003, and Iraqi archaeological sites starting in 2003. During this time period, The New York Times reported 84 articles about the status of Iraqi antiquities. Interestingly, the newspaper focused 62 of the articles on the looting of the National Museum of Iraq and subsequent recovery efforts. In this thesis, I will evaluate factors such as subject, article length, word choice, author, paper section, date, accuracy of information, and other relevant influences to determine differences in coverage between the different instances of Iraqi cultural heritage looting. The factors will demonstrate that the marketable qualities of the story, availability of information, and danger of location are some of the factors that led to the disproportional reporting by The New York Times.

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  • 2015-05

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Wild Woman versus she-Dragon: Maternity, Violence and the Monstrous-Feminine in the Geese Book

Description

Medieval European manuscripts contain a wealth of diverse and imaginative collections of illuminations. The margins are a perfect playground for unique, unusual and fantastic creatures, including an illuminated gradual from

Medieval European manuscripts contain a wealth of diverse and imaginative collections of illuminations. The margins are a perfect playground for unique, unusual and fantastic creatures, including an illuminated gradual from 1510 known as the Geese Book. In this paper, I have examined a single illumination from the book in depth. It depicts two female monsters, a wild woman and a female dragon, fighting desperately over a wild child. These two females are not only monsters and fighters, but also mothers. The unusual juxtaposition of the nurturing aspect of maternity and the brutal nature of combat is used to facilitate a discussion about women, violence, and the nature of the monstrous-feminine. The way women are presented and constructed in horror is far different than their male counterparts, as gendered expectations differ wildly. These manuscript illuminations contain combat and potentially horrific situations, but nearly always come off as humorous. I will also be discussing the importance of humor in difficult and potentially problematic situations. Comedy, particularly dark comedy, can scrutinize aspects of culture and society that may otherwise be considered improper taboo to touch upon. Unusual women behaving in an improper manner is a rare subject, and one that deserves to be discussed. By going through historical legends that also combine the usually disparate themes of maternity and violence, I attempt to both explain the image in the Geese Book and frame it in a broader context. The monstrous women from the illumination are compared to both artworks contemporary to the gradual and more modern media. By connecting representations from both the Middle Ages and today, we can better understand where feminine constructions originated and how they have changed. Today, portrayals of the monstrous-feminine have warped traditional maternal archetypes and are unafraid to lay bare the bizarre and grotesque potential of motherhood.

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  • 2018-05

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Italian antiquities in America: contextualizing repatriation

Description

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and U.S. institutions modeled themselves after this example. In the 20th century, defining cultural property, in the form of excavated objects, became a priority for many nations and resulted in the scrutiny of ancient artifacts, in particular. This led to the establishment of international protocols which sought to protect items during times of both peace and war. Despite international legislation, the trade of illicit antiquities continued. A major advocate for repatriation, the nation of Italy aggressively sought return of many objects from antiquity and recently approached the Metropolitan Museum of Art regarding several items whose provenance was suspect. Ultimately the conflict was resolved through The Metropolitan Museum of Art-Republic of Italy Agreement of February 21, 2006, which transferred the title of six antiquities to Italy in return for long term loans of equivalent objects to the museum. The landmark agreement represents a mutually profitable resolution to a situation potentially plaguing thousands of institutions worldwide. The implications of replication of the agreement can potentially change how museums, nations and the public understand concepts of ownership and may reduce the role of permanent collections in favor of sharing, rather than possessing, world heritage.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Salvation in Nuremberg: an iconographic description of selected historiated initials from the Geese book

Description

Morgan Library MS M.905 (the Geese Book) is the last known illuminated gradual produced for the Church of St. Lorenz in Nuremberg, Germany. The Geese Book, which was created

Morgan Library MS M.905 (the Geese Book) is the last known illuminated gradual produced for the Church of St. Lorenz in Nuremberg, Germany. The Geese Book, which was created during the early sixteenth century, has been in the collection of the Morgan Library since 1961. This thesis describes the iconography of the eight historiated initials that illustrate the earthly life of Christ from the Annunciation to the Ascension. A detailed description of the content of each initial is followed by a brief history of the iconographic development of the identified event in order to determine whether or not the Geese Book uses a standard or nonstandard iconography. The results of this analysis reveal how this manuscript fits into the broader contexts of Christian art as well as the specific time and place of its creation. It shows that the iconography of the Geese Book reflected current theological beliefs and societal norms and allowed contemporary viewers of the Geese Book to feel a strong connection to the depicted events.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Re-simulating an artificial view: contemporary western American landscape photography

Description

Western landscape photography helped to create an imaginative perception of a new nation for Americans. Early nineteenth-century photographers captured a vision of uncharted terrain that metaphorically fulfilled a two-fold illusion:

Western landscape photography helped to create an imaginative perception of a new nation for Americans. Early nineteenth-century photographers captured a vision of uncharted terrain that metaphorically fulfilled a two-fold illusion: an untouched Eden and a land ready and waiting for white settlement. The sublime and picturesque experiences of the West provided artists a concept that could be capitalized upon by employing various forms of manipulation. In the twentieth-century, the role of landscape photography evolved as did the advancement of the West. Images of wilderness became art and photographers chose to view the western landscape differently. Some focused more sharply and critically on the relationship between the land and the people who lived on it. The influential exhibition in 1975, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape presented work that showed a landscape altered, marked by power lines, houses, and fences. The West as Eden no longer existed. Today, photographers continue to examine, image, and experience western land anew. In this thesis I examine the relationship of contemporary landscape photography and the role of the West, guided by an analysis that traces the history of American ideologies and attitudes toward natural land. The artists I have chosen recognize landscape not as scenery but as the spaces and systems people inhabit, and use manipulative strategies that emphasize an artificial character of the West. Their work elicits antecedent mythologies, pictorial models, and American ideologies that continue to perpetuate internationally.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Using design to make the home whole: meaning and the model home : Arizona in the 1950s

Description

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images of family life to increase sales. This research notes that not only do the structure, design, and layout of the model home formulate cultural identity but also the furnishings and materials within. Together, the model home and carefully selected artifacts placed therein help to express specific chosen lifestyles as that the home builder determines. This thesis considers the model home as constructed as well as builder's publications, descriptions, and advertisements. The research recognizes the many facets of merchandising, consumerism, and commercialism influencing the design and architecture of the suburban home. Historians of visual and cultural studies often investigate these issues as separate components. By contrast, this thesis offers an integrated framework of inquiry, drawing upon such disciplines as cultural history, anthropology, and material culture. The research methodology employs two forms of content analysis - image and text. The study analyzes 36 model homes built in Phoenix, Arizona, during the period 1955-1956. The thesis explores how the builder sends a message, i.e. images, ideals, and aspirations, to the potential home buyer through the design and decoration of the model home. It then speculates how the home buyer responds to those messages. The symbiotic relationship between the sender and receiver, together, tells a story about the Phoenix lifestyle and the domestic ideals of the 1950s. Builders sent messages surrounding convenience, spaciousness, added luxury, and indoor-outdoor living to a growing and discriminating home buying market.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Marginalia of the Geese book: inside and outside the borders

Description

The early-16th-century manuscript commonly known as the Geese Book (New York, Morgan Library, M. 905) contains the entire Mass liturgy sung by the boys choir of the parish church of

The early-16th-century manuscript commonly known as the Geese Book (New York, Morgan Library, M. 905) contains the entire Mass liturgy sung by the boys choir of the parish church of St. Lorenz in Nuremberg, Germany prior to the Reformation. This thesis addresses the location and function of the sometimes enigmatic marginalia and the decorated or historiated initials in this large two-volume gradual. The paper begins with an analytical case study of a scene within the margins in which a wild woman, wielding a club, confronts a female dragon who has taken a child. Subsequently the size, subject matter, and physical positioning of the illuminations and decorations within the book and on its pages are examined with respect to the gradual's liturgical contents. It is hoped that through such methods, new conversations may begin as to the roles that marginalia and decoration may play within the multiple organizational schemes within a musical text of this kind.

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Date Created
  • 2013