Matching Items (29)

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Probing the Radio Sky with the Low Frequency Array

Description

The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new and innovative radio telescope designed and constructed by the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON). LOFAR unique capable of operating in very

The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new and innovative radio telescope designed and constructed by the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON). LOFAR unique capable of operating in very low frequencies (10-240 MHz) and consists of an extensive interferometry array of dipole antenna stations distributed throughout the Netherlands and Europe which allows it to achieve superb angular resolution. I investigate a part of the northern sky to search for rare radio objects such as radio haloes and radio relics that may have not been able to have been resolved by other radio telescopes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Characterization of Ions Found in Circumgalactic Clouds

Description

Galaxies in the universe are surrounded by a hot medium called the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM). Present the CGM is gas that forms up clouds which travel within the CGM at

Galaxies in the universe are surrounded by a hot medium called the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM). Present the CGM is gas that forms up clouds which travel within the CGM at speeds that approximately range between 100 km/s and 300 km/s. These gas clouds are very interesting because they play a crucial in the formation of stars within the galaxies and also in the overall evolution of galaxies. The clouds could in fact be thought of as mobile "gas stations" whose sole purpose is facilitate the ionization of elements and ultimately supply gas to galaxies. My thesis project is a follow-up study on CGM gas cloud observations that were made by Borthakur et. al. (2016). Using Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Borthakur et. al. (2016) observed the presence of both Carbon IV (C IV) and Oxygen VI (O IV) but did not observe any Nitrogen V (N V) in the gas cloud when expected to be observable. Therefore, the ultimate goal of my research was to determine whether indeed CGM gas clouds have an actual shortage of the N V ion. My research involves the generation of cosmological simulations of a cold gas cloud that has a radius of 98 parsecs, relative velocity of 200 km/s, density range of 10-3 to -5 and a temperature in the range of ~104 to 5 K, and also a hot CGM that has density in the range of 10-4.5 to -6 particles/cm3 and temperature of approximately 106 K. Traces of N v are observed in my simulations.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Studying Spectral Index of Radio Galaxies with LOFAR

Description

Radio astronomy is a subfield in astronomy that deals with objects emitting frequencies around 10 MHz to 100 GHz. The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is a array of radio antennas

Radio astronomy is a subfield in astronomy that deals with objects emitting frequencies around 10 MHz to 100 GHz. The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is a array of radio antennas in Europe that can reach very low frequencies, roughly between 10-240 MHz. Our project was to image and clean a field from LOFAR. The data was a 10 degree square in the sky centered at a right ascension of 10:19:34.608 and a declination +49.36.52.482. It was observed for 600 seconds at 141 MHz. To clean the field, we had to flag and remove any stations that were not responding. Using a program called FACTOR, we cleaned the image and reduced the residuals. Next we checked the validity of our sources. We checked positional offsets for our sources using the TGSS survey at 150 MHz, and corrected the declination of our LOFAR sources by a factor of 0.0002 degrees. We also fixed the LOFAR fluxes by a factor of 1.15. After this systematic check, we calculated the spectral index of our sources using the FIRST survey at 1435 MHz. We plotted this spectral index against LOFAR flux as well as redshift of the sources, and compared these to literature.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Numerical Simulation of the Surface Brightness of Astrophysical Jets

Description

The goal of this thesis is to extend the astrophysical jet model created by Dr.
Gardner and Dr. Jones to model the surface brightness of astrophysical jets. We attempt to

The goal of this thesis is to extend the astrophysical jet model created by Dr.
Gardner and Dr. Jones to model the surface brightness of astrophysical jets. We attempt to accomplish this goal by modeling the astrophysical jet HH30 in the spectral emission lines [SII] 6716Å, [OI] 6300Å, and [NII] 6583Å. In order to do so, we used the jet model to simulate the temperature and density of the jet to match observational data by Hartigan and Morse (2007). From these results, we derived the emissivities in these emission lines using Cloudy by Ferland et al. (2013). Then we used the emissivities to determine the surface brightness of the jet in these lines. We found that the simulated surface brightness agreed with the observational surface brightness and we conclude that the model could successfully be extended to model the surface brightness of a jet.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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WENO Simulations of AGN-jet Induced Star Formation

Description

This project discusses simulation results of star formation by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets using the WENO method. A typical AGN jet with velocity uj=0.3c, density ρj=10^(-2) H/cm3, and temperature

This project discusses simulation results of star formation by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets using the WENO method. A typical AGN jet with velocity uj=0.3c, density ρj=10^(-2) H/cm3, and temperature Tj=10^(7) K was injected into a 425 light years square region. The jet passes through a stationary inhomogeneous ambient background of temperature Ta=5x10^4 K and density ρa= 2 H/cm^3 to test if AGN jets, by creating bow shocks propagating through the interstellar medium and molecular clouds, can form stars in the densest regions. According to the star formation criteria for gravitational collapse of Cen and Ostriker, the resulting simulations indicate the presence of star formation via AGN jets (1992). The parameters are tuned to match Centaurs A to identify star formation in this galaxy. The simulations will also be run in three dimensions in the future and for longer time intervals to gain a better understanding of the star formation process via AGN jets.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Luminosity function of Lyman-alpha emitters at the reionization epoch: observations & theory

Description

Galaxies with strong Lyman-alpha (Lya) emission line (also called Lya galaxies or emitters) offer an unique probe of the epoch of reionization - one of the important phases when most

Galaxies with strong Lyman-alpha (Lya) emission line (also called Lya galaxies or emitters) offer an unique probe of the epoch of reionization - one of the important phases when most of the neutral hydrogen in the universe was ionized. In addition, Lya galaxies at high redshifts are a powerful tool to study low-mass galaxy formation. Since current observations suggest that the reionization is complete by redshift z~ 6, it is therefore necessary to discover galaxies at z > 6, to use their luminosity function (LF) as a probe of reionization. I found five z = 7.7 candidate Lya galaxies with line fluxes > 7x10-18 erg/s/cm/2 , from three different deep near-infrared (IR) narrowband (NB) imaging surveys in a volume > 4x104Mpc3. From the spectroscopic followup of four candidate galaxies, and with the current spectroscopic sensitivity, the detection of only the brightest candidate galaxy can be ruled out at 5 sigma level. Moreover, these observations successfully demonstrate that the sensitivity necessary for both, the NB imaging as well as the spectroscopic followup of z~ 8 Lya galaxies can be reached with the current instrumentation. While future, more sensitive spectroscopic observations are necessary, the observed Lya LF at z = 7.7 is consistent with z = 6.6 LF, suggesting that the intergalactic medium (IGM) is relatively ionized even at z = 7.7, with neutral fraction xHI≤ 30%. On the theoretical front, while several models of Lya emitters have been developed, the physical nature of Lya emitters is not yet completely known. Moreover, multi-parameter models and their complexities necessitates a simpler model. I have developed a simple, single-parameter model to populate dark mater halos with Lya emitters. The central tenet of this model, different from many of the earlier models, is that the star-formation rate (SFR), and hence the Lya luminosity, is proportional to the mass accretion rate rather than the total halo mass. This simple model is successful in reproducing many observable including LFs, stellar masses, SFRs, and clustering of Lya emitters from z~ 3 to z~ 7. Finally, using this model, I find that the mass accretion, and hence the star-formation in > 30% of Lya emitters at z~ 3 occur through major mergers, and this fraction increases to ~ 50% at z~7.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Observing simulated images of the high redshift universe: the faint end luminosity function

Description

Numerical simulations are very helpful in understanding the physics of the formation of structure and galaxies. However, it is sometimes difficult to interpret model data with respect to observations, partly

Numerical simulations are very helpful in understanding the physics of the formation of structure and galaxies. However, it is sometimes difficult to interpret model data with respect to observations, partly due to the difficulties and background noise inherent to observation. The goal, here, is to attempt to bridge this gap between simulation and observation by rendering the model output in image format which is then processed by tools commonly used in observational astronomy. Images are synthesized in various filters by folding the output of cosmological simulations of gasdynamics with star-formation and dark matter with the Bruzual- Charlot stellar population synthesis models. A variation of the Virgo-Gadget numerical simulation code is used with the hybrid gas and stellar formation models of Springel and Hernquist (2003). Outputs taken at various redshifts are stacked to create a synthetic view of the simulated star clusters. Source Extractor (SExtractor) is used to find groupings of stellar populations which are considered as galaxies or galaxy building blocks and photometry used to estimate the rest frame luminosities and distribution functions. With further refinements, this is expected to provide support for missions such as JWST, as well as to probe what additional physics are needed to model the data. The results show good agreement in many respects with observed properties of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) over a wide range of high redshifts. In particular, the slope (alpha) when fitted to the standard Schechter function shows excellent agreement both in value and evolution with redshift, when compared with observation. Discrepancies of other properties with observation are seen to be a result of limitations of the simulation and additional feedback mechanisms which are needed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Dwarf galaxies as laboratories of protogalaxy physics: canonical star formation laws at low metallicity

Description

In the upcoming decade, powerful new astronomical facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and ground-based 30-meter telescopes will open up the epoch

In the upcoming decade, powerful new astronomical facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and ground-based 30-meter telescopes will open up the epoch of reionization to direct astronomical observation. One of the primary tools used to understand the bulk astrophysical properties of the high-redshift universe are empirically-derived star-forming laws, which relate observed luminosity to fundamental astrophysical quantities such as star formation rate. The radio/infrared relation is one of the more mysterious of these relations: despite its somewhat uncertain astrophysical origins, this relation is extremely tight and linear, with 0.3 dex of scatter over five orders of magnitude in galaxy luminosity. The effects of primordial metallicities on canonical star-forming laws is an open question: a growing body of evidence suggests that the current empirical star forming laws may not be valid in the unenriched, metal-poor environment of the very early universe.

In the modern universe, nearby dwarf galaxies with less than 1/10th the Solar metal abundance provide an opportunity to recalibrate our star formation laws and study the astrophysics of extremely metal-deficient (XMD) environments in detail. I assemble a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies, all within 100 megaparsecs, with nebular oxygen abundances between 1/5th and 1/50th Solar. I identify the subsample of these galaxies with space-based mid- and far-infrared data, and investigate the effects of extreme metallicities on the infrared-radio relationship. For ten of these galaxies, I have acquired 40 hours of observations with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). C-band (4-8 GHz) radio continuum emission is detected from all 10 of these galaxies. These represent the first radio continuum detections from seven galaxies in this sample: Leo A, UGC 4704, HS 0822+3542, SBS 0940+544, and SBS 1129+476. The radio continuum in these galaxies is strongly associated with the presence of optical H-alpha emission, with spectral slopes suggesting a mix of thermal and non-thermal sources. I use the ratio of the radio and far-infrared emission to investigate behavior of the C-band (4-8 GHz) radio/infrared relation at metallicities below 1/10th Solar.

I compare the low metallicity sample with the 4.8 GHz radio/infrared relationship from the KINGFISHER nearby galaxy sample Tabatabaei et al. 2017 and to the 1.4 GHz radio/infrared relationship from the blue compact dwarf galaxy sample of Wu et al. 2008. The infrared/radio ratio q of the low metallicity galaxies is below the average q of star forming galaxies in the modern universe. I compare these galaxies' infrared and radio luminosities to their corresponding Halpha luminosities, and find that both the infrared/Halpha and the radio/H-alpha ratios are reduced by nearly 1 dex in the low metallicity sample vs. higher metallicity galaxies; however the deficit is not straightforwardly interpreted as a metallicity effect.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Galaxy evolution with hybrid methods

Description

I combine, compare, and contrast the results from two different numerical techniques (grid vs. particle methods) studying multi-scale processes in galaxy and structure formation. I produce a method for recreating

I combine, compare, and contrast the results from two different numerical techniques (grid vs. particle methods) studying multi-scale processes in galaxy and structure formation. I produce a method for recreating identical initial conditions for one method from those of the other, and explore methodologies necessary for making these two methods as consistent as possible. With this, I first study the impact of streaming velocities of baryons with respect to dark matter, present at the epoch of reionization, on the ability for small halos to accrete gas at high redshift. With the inclusion of this stream velocity, I find the central density profile of halos is reduced, overall gas condensation is delayed, and infer a delay in the inevitable creation of stars.

I then combine the two numerical methods to study starburst outflows as they interact with satellite halos. This process leads to shocks catalyzing the formation of molecular coolants that lead to bursts in star formation, a process that is better captured in grid methods. The resultant clumps of stars are removed from their initial dark matter halo, resemble precursors to modern-day globular clusters, and their formation may be observable with upcoming telescopes.

Finally, I perform two simulation suites, comparing each numerical method's ability to model the impact of energetic feedback from accreting black holes at the core of giant clusters. With these comparisons I show that black hole feedback can maintain a hot diffuse medium while limiting the amount of gas that can condense into the interstellar medium, reducing the central star formation by up to an order of magnitude.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014