Matching Items (12)

21st Century Breakdown: The Influence of Social Media on New Bands in the 21st Century

Description

21st Century Breakdown: The Influence of Social Media on New Bands in the 21st Century is a creative project that explores the development of social media in its relation to

21st Century Breakdown: The Influence of Social Media on New Bands in the 21st Century is a creative project that explores the development of social media in its relation to music and how, over time, it has impacted the music industry. More specifically, the documentary explains the significance of social media to new bands at this moment in time (2017), which is seen through the development of local Phoenix band The Breaking Pattern. The documentary follows The Breaking Pattern for a year from the release of their debut album to the early stages of their second album. The documentary reveals that social media is essential to new bands, allows smaller bands to stay competitive in the industry and allows artists to present a certain identity, genuine or cultivated, to the public. Keywords: social media, identity, music, internet, documentary

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Asha Kirana: Working With Angels

Description

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a better quality of life. The documentary film uses the story of one hospital and the doctors working there to illustrate a larger problem with the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in India. The goal of this film is to start a conversation about how India can help to destigmatize HIV/AIDS. The film uses a positive message of education, hope and passion to show how doctors and patients in India have already begun to reverse the stigma surrounding HIV in their community and how they hope to expand their efforts in the future. This project includes a written methodology explaining the goals for the film which include: showing how infected women and children in India are perceived, how important counseling is for a person with a terminal illness and how important education is in de-stigmatization of HIV/AIDS. The methodology also explains the current situation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in India, the inspiration behind the film and the ways in which this film can create social change in India. The entire process of creating this documentary is also explained in a first-person narrative from the filmmaker. This gives insight into the filming process, immersion into another culture, how sources were cultivated, how interviews were conducted, restrictions and obstacles during the filming process, how those issues were overcome and the filmmaker's personal reflections.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135985-Thumbnail Image.png

How The Digital Age Has Affected The Relationship Between Journalists And Their Confidential Sources: An Arizona Perspective

Description

The rise of digital communication use has affected the relationship between journalists and their confidential sources, especially journalists covering national security. My thesis focuses on analyzing source relationship cultivation in

The rise of digital communication use has affected the relationship between journalists and their confidential sources, especially journalists covering national security. My thesis focuses on analyzing source relationship cultivation in the digital age and how digital communication has changed the way sources and journalists interact, on a national and local level specifically in Arizona. I also look in to Arizona media law following the digital age, how it has changed, and how it affects source relationships. Why Arizona media law protects our state journalists more than the national law protects national journalists is also a topic of discussion.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

137446-Thumbnail Image.png

Fiction's Role in Science and Society: An Analysis and Implementation

Description

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the other hand, provides an elegant solution by exploring the world through a myriad point of views including complete omniscience. This thesis explores the link between journalism and fiction by taking real-world scenarios and exploring them without journalism's limitations. It includes three novellas totaling 25,000 words drawn from true-to-life research papers, news stories and manifestos to paint a realistic picture of a technological reality in the near future, a style of writing one might call futurecasting. The thesis also contains an analysis of the techniques used in contemporary fiction and an analysis of their implementation within the novellas. The goal of the novellas is to let researchers to explore the impact of their work before its mass dissemination in order to shape societal, national and international policy responsibly. Similarly, novellas like this and others similar allow society to discover the beauty of science through fiction. These are some of fiction's greatest roles in science and society.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

135554-Thumbnail Image.png

Film Reviews: A Complete Look at the 2015 Oscar Nominated Films

Description

My name is Adriana Becerra and I am a student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. In hoping to combine my two

My name is Adriana Becerra and I am a student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. In hoping to combine my two passions of journalism and film, for my Honors Undergraduate Thesis project I created my own film review website. My website is a complete review of the films that were nominated for the 2015 Oscars in the following categories: Best Picture, Animated Feature, Documentary Feature, Foreign Language, and Short Film Live Action. In all, I watched and reviewed a total of twenty-eight films based on acting, lighting, music, cinematography, costume/makeup/set design, writing, and visual effects. Over the course of nine months, I have watched, reviewed, and talked extensively about each film that I have reviewed. Though tedious at times, I thoroughly enjoyed completing my Undergraduate Thesis Project. I hope to continue critically looking at films, and possibly even incorporating film in my journalistic career.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

132242-Thumbnail Image.png

Jefferson, The First Amendment and the Predicament of Misinformation

Description

America has been widely considered a great democratic experiment, which is a characterization attributed to Thomas Jefferson. An experiment can be designed to use trial-and-error methods to find a certain

America has been widely considered a great democratic experiment, which is a characterization attributed to Thomas Jefferson. An experiment can be designed to use trial-and-error methods to find a certain outcome. While not a conscious effort, the United States has experienced a trial-and-error experimental process in developing legislation that will restrict dangerous misinformation without violating the speech and press clauses of the First Amendment. In several of his personal writings and official speeches, Jefferson advised against additional government intervention with regard to filtering true and false information published by the press or distributed by citizens. His argument is a guiding theme throughout this thesis, which explores that experimental process and its relation to contemporary efforts to address and prevent future phenomena like the fake news outbreak of 2016.
This thesis utilizes an examination of examples of laws designed to control misinformation, past and present, then using those examples to provide context to both arguments in favor of and opposing new misinformation laws. Extensive archival research was conducted to ensure that accurate historical reflection could be included in offering information about historical examples, as well as through application of relevant literature. The possible effects on the electorate and the practices of the press by those laws of the past and potential proposals for new legislation are also discussed in an effort to provide further context to, and support for, the conclusions reached. Those conclusions include that additional regulation is necessary to discourage the creation and distribution of fake news and misinformation in order to protect the public from the violence or imminent unlawful action they may cause.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

A Middle Ground: An In-depth Look into the History of the Second Amendment

Description

A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. There are few words

A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. There are few words that have proved as controversial and dividing as these in the Second Amendment of the United States Constitution. Especially today, it seems like every few months we are faced with a new, darker reality of mass shootings and unintended deaths. And everyone has their opinion on the matter. The primary goal of this paper and documentary, A Middle Ground, is to get to the root of the issue: what was the original intent of the Second Amendment and how has that intent changed from 1789 to today? Is there common ground for both sides of the issue? The paper describes the pre-production, production and post-production process of A Middle Ground documentary including problems, solutions and triumphs. The paper also discusses the history of the Second Amendment from its inception to its current day status in the Supreme Court. A Middle Ground follows the Supreme Court case Printz v. United States through the eyes of one of its main plaintiffs, former Graham County Sheriff Richard Mack. The documentary follows Sheriff Mack from his original choice to sue the Federal Government over the Brady Bill to the Supreme Court’s decision. It also touches on the history of the Second Amendment and how Printz v. United States impacted recent historic court cases on the Second Amendment. The case also jumpstarted the individual right movement that is the most prevalent interpretation of the Second Amendment today.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132277-Thumbnail Image.png

Matal v. Tam: A Historical Perspective on Hate Speech, Its Protection and Its Regulation

Description

There are certain clear-cut instances where speech is used only to harm, where the context of the situation does not affect or alter the meaning. These instances, however, are rare.

There are certain clear-cut instances where speech is used only to harm, where the context of the situation does not affect or alter the meaning. These instances, however, are rare. The issue presented in Matal v. Tam (2017) highlights the government’s inability to, and difficulty in, attempting to prohibit assumed offensive content. This thesis argues that even in the rare and overt instances, the government is required to abstain from regulating hate speech, and that the government will not be able to successfully adopt advocate proposed hate-speech regulations. This thesis embraces the concept of precedent as the most binding force in First Amendment questions. It also begins argumentation at the most important era of First Amendment issues, and then analyzes numerous cases spanning nearly one hundred years. Utilizing case rulings, this thesis examines the American social context, as well as academic and historical writings, throughout the past century. Ultimately, this thesis finds that the decision in Matal was not surprising, and that it supports a contemporary First Amendment jurisprudence that believes in a strong divide between the government and private speech. The implications of Matal have been almost immediate, with several lawsuits being decided or brought to court based on the precedent. The decision implies that hate-speech regulations, already given little credence, will share a similar outcome to the law in Matal.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

155301-Thumbnail Image.png

Toward a theory of true crime: forms and functions of nonfiction murder narratives

Description

The mass media genre known as true crime is dismissed often as a more sensational, less reliable iteration of traditional crime journalism. Consumer and editorial confusion exists because there is

The mass media genre known as true crime is dismissed often as a more sensational, less reliable iteration of traditional crime journalism. Consumer and editorial confusion exists because there is no overarching criteria determining what is, and what is not, true crime. To that extent, the complete history of true crime’s origins and its best practitioners and works cannot be known with any certainty, and its future forms cannot be anticipated. Scholarship is overdue on an effective criteria to determine when nonfiction murder narratives cease to be long-form crime reporting and become something else. Against the backdrop of this long-evolving, multi-faceted literary/documentary genre, the researcher in this exploratory, qualitative study seeks to (a) examine the historical tension between formal journalism and true crime; (b) reveal how traditional journalism both reviles and plunders true crime for its rhetorical treasures; and (c) explain how this has destabilized the meaning of the term “true crime” to the degree that a more substantive understanding needs to be established. Through a textual analysis of the forms and functions of representative artifacts, the researcher will suggest that a Theory of True Crime could be patterned after time-tested analytic codes created for fiction, but structured in a simple two-stage examination that would test for dominant characteristics of established true crime texts.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

157360-Thumbnail Image.png

Six Post-9/11 American War Films: Towards an Evolution of Nontraditional Masculine Constructs

Description

Scholars argue that masculinity and war are united because masculinity is best observed through male-dominated arenas, such as the military. Moreover, film can serve as a medium to not only

Scholars argue that masculinity and war are united because masculinity is best observed through male-dominated arenas, such as the military. Moreover, film can serve as a medium to not only establish what is socially acceptable, but play an active role in the creation of one’s identity. Filmmakers past and present have employed the motif of masculinity in their war films, which put it at the center of the social structure and creates an overall acceptable cultural ideology. These filmmakers have established the overall rules, themes, and methods used as part of the war film genre. These rules, themes, and methods served well for pre-1970 American war cinema, when women were not allowed in the military as soldiers. However, as of 2003, female soldiers have grown to comprise twenty percent of the active soldiers and officers in the military. Studies on masculinity construction are well documented in World War II, Vietnam, and Gulf War-era combat films; however, little has been studied on post-9/11 American war films involving the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Using literature on masculinity constructs, both inside and outside of film, as well as social construction theory, identity theory, genre theory, and auteur theory, this dissertation textually examines masculinity construction in six post-9/11 American war films. This dissertation finds that the contemporary war genre continues to construct masculinity similar to past eras of war film. Comradery, the warrior image, not showing emotion, having a violent demeanor, and the demonization of women and cowardice were all prevalent in one or more of the films analyzed in this study. However, there were many nontraditional masculine ideals that were implemented, such as women being present and taking an active role as soldiers, as well as women being portrayed in the warrior image. The films analyzed demonstrate that the war film genre is still depicting and therefore socially constructing masculinity in a way that was prevalent in pre-1970 war films. However, the genre is evolving and nontraditional masculinity constructs are starting to present themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019