Matching Items (3)

127726-Thumbnail Image.png

George Morrison's Surrealism

Description

The Chippewa modernist George Morrison (1919-2000) was the first Native American artist to be engaged by surrealist principles and strategies, including automatic writing, collage, and the use of found objects.

The Chippewa modernist George Morrison (1919-2000) was the first Native American artist to be engaged by surrealist principles and strategies, including automatic writing, collage, and the use of found objects. After training at the Art Students League in New York City (1943-‘46) and studying and exhibiting in Paris and the south of France (1952-‘53), Morrison participated in the Abstract Expressionist milieu in Manhattan, where he was befriended by the painter Franz Kline. After more than twenty-five years as a conflicted expatriate, Morrison returned to his Native roots in Minnesota in 1970 and began to use Surrealism and its interest in dreams to forge an identity as an indigenous modernist. Because of his unwavering commitment to a surrealist process that he practiced for almost sixty years, authenticity and integrity are the twin characteristics that unify Morrison’s diverse creations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

The Journal of Surrealism and the Americas: Vol. 7 No. 1 (2013)

Description

The Journal of Surrealism and the Americas: Vol. 7 No. 1 (2013) - Table of Contents

“Introduction to the Issue and Special Section on Native American Surrealisms” by Claudia Mesch, p.

The Journal of Surrealism and the Americas: Vol. 7 No. 1 (2013) - Table of Contents

“Introduction to the Issue and Special Section on Native American Surrealisms” by Claudia Mesch, p. i-iv. 

“George Morrison’s Surrealism” by W. Jackson Rushing III, p. 1-18. 

“César Moro’s Transnational Surrealism” by Michele Greet, p. 19-51. 

“A Modernist Moment: Native Art and Surrealism at the University of Oklahoma” by Mark A. White, p. 52-70.

“The Opposite of Snake: Surrealism and the Art of Jimmie Durham” by Mary Modeen, p. 71-95. 

“‘My World is Surreal,’ or ‘The Northwest Coast’ is Surreal” by Charlotte Townsend-Gault, p. 96-107. 

“Complexity and Contradiction in Native American Surrealism” by Robert Silberman, p. 108-130. 

“Review of ‘Double Solitaire: The Surreal Worlds of Kay Sage and Yves Tanguy’ & Kay Sage, ‘The Biographical Chronology and Four Surrealist One Act Plays’” by Larry List, p. 131-134.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013