Matching Items (20)

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Preschool Yogis: A Pilot Study to Determine the Feasibility of a Structured Classroom-Based Yoga Program

Description

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility (i.e., acceptability) of a yoga intervention implemented within a preschool with typically and atypically developing children.
Participants: 29 children

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility (i.e., acceptability) of a yoga intervention implemented within a preschool with typically and atypically developing children.
Participants: 29 children between the ages of three and five years that are currently attending the Mary Lou Fulton Teacher’s College Preschool.

Methods: Children participated in eight ~15-20-minute yoga sessions consisting of an opening circle, breathing, mindful movement, and a closing circle with relaxation time. Parents completed weekly homework assignments and surveys about the homework. Parents and teachers both completed daily behavior logs to track their child’s number of outbursts, mention of yoga, and use of yoga. Additionally, parents completed a post-intervention survey to determine overall satisfaction.

Results: The Preschool Behavior Questionnaire paired t-test results did not demonstrate any significant differences in pre-intervention (M=13.00, SD±7.55) and post-intervention (M=11.95, SD±6.92) scores, t(17)=0.94, p=0.36. There were no visible correlations between outbursts and use of yoga as reported by parents, but the use of yoga increased with the number of outbursts as reported by parents. Overall, parents felt the sessions had a positive effect on their child’s behavior and felt their children enjoyed the sessions.

Conclusion: Implementing classroom-based yoga programs could be an acceptable, realistic option to manage and prevent negative behaviors in preschool children.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Parent Satisfaction with Teacher Training and Strategies for Children with ASD

Description

This study explores parent satisfaction with their child's education based on teacher training and teacher credentials regarding Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The study seeks to answer four questions about the

This study explores parent satisfaction with their child's education based on teacher training and teacher credentials regarding Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The study seeks to answer four questions about the relationship between parent satisfaction and a variety of factors concerning school type and teacher credentials. To investigate these questions, the researcher analyzed data from parent questionnaires and teacher questionnaires.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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New to the state and new to teaching: Creating Authentic Resilient Educators (C.A.R.E.) utilizing digital narratives

Description

This action research study focused on the beginning teacher attrition issues plaguing schools today. Specifically, this project explored a way to support out-of-state beginning teachers, who are traditionally difficult

This action research study focused on the beginning teacher attrition issues plaguing schools today. Specifically, this project explored a way to support out-of-state beginning teachers, who are traditionally difficult to retain. While there is literature on teacher retention, the retention of out-of-state teachers has not been well examined. Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory and Bandura's self-efficacy theories provided a foundational understanding of this group's needs.

This study utilized interactive support sessions for six out-of-state beginning teachers that had five face-to-face sessions and required the teachers to submit weekly reflections between sessions using an iPad and app that allowed teachers to design their reflections using digital images, words, and/or narration. These weekly digital reflections, mapping activities collected during the support sessions, a pre- and post-innovation questionnaire, and interviews provided insights on the impact of these supports, as well as changes that occurred in self-perceptions.

The results of this study indicate the challenge and complexities of being an out-of-state beginning teacher. The data showed that the teachers must first have had their basic needs met before they could fully explore and settle into their new identities and role as the classroom teacher. The data also indicated that intentionally teaching these teachers strategies around resiliency, stress management, and self-advocacy was useful for navigating their first semester. The supportive community that developed within the group emerged as a significant finding, and showed the importance of support structures for new teachers, especially for those who are struggling with both a new job and new community.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Warriors mentor warriors: a cross-age mentoring program

Description

Adolescence comes with a multitude of challenges that students must face, while still positively engaging with other students and teachers within the school environment. Eighth grade students, in particular, face

Adolescence comes with a multitude of challenges that students must face, while still positively engaging with other students and teachers within the school environment. Eighth grade students, in particular, face issues pertaining to behavior control and behavior problems, which in turn impacts their ability to be successful in a school setting. Cross-Age Mentoring Programs (CAMPs) have been shown to improve youth behavior when youth are matched with individuals who act as positive role models over an extended period of time. The primary function of CAMPs is to assist mentors and mentees in building a strong relationship that consists of trust and empathy, which in turn leads to the ability for mentors to lead mentees towards the achievement of goals.

The purpose of this action research study was to introduce an innovation aimed at helping eighth grade students improve their behavior control and behavior problems. The innovation consisted of a nine-week CAMP that paired eight eighth graders with eight eleventh graders at a charter school in Phoenix, Arizona. Mentors and mentees met twice a week before school with the purpose of addressing the behavior control and behavior problem goals that they co-created. Mixed-method data were collected: the quantitative data collection tools were pre- and post-intervention mentee surveys and teacher weekly behavior reports, and the qualitative data collection tools included mentee and mentor journal entries, researcher observations, and mentoring conversation checklists.

Results showed that mentors and mentees were able to develop positive close personal relationships with one another, as seen in the researcher observations. In addition to the development of positive relationships, researcher observations, and journal prompt entries provided data to support mentees meeting their goals and mentee self-identification of positive improvement in behavior problems and control. Conversely, there were no significant changes in behavior control and behavior problems as reported on the survey and teacher weekly behavior reports. Attendance and retention of students created challenges in accurately assessing the results of this program; however, consistent with the literature, this study suggests that CAMPs should be sustained longer and with consistent attendance to achieve goals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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The Impact of Agile Elements on ADDIE: The Agile ADDIE Framework

Description

The traditional analysis, design, develop, implement, and evaluate (ADDIE) model is inadequate for dealing with the instructional design requirements of today’s constantly evolving world. This reality is especially true at

The traditional analysis, design, develop, implement, and evaluate (ADDIE) model is inadequate for dealing with the instructional design requirements of today’s constantly evolving world. This reality is especially true at the National Simulation Center where medicine and technology are constantly changing. To provide the best care for the nation’s veterans, the educational products must too reflect the current state of medicine.

The Agile ADDIE Framework was developed to overcome challenges such as a constantly changing domain, external threats to the development process, and the need for expedited timelines while still creating quality products. Using agile theory, including the agile manifesto, as a theoretical framework, the Agile ADDIE Framework was created. The Agile ADDIE Framework implements agile elements into the traditional ADDIE model, such as an iterate, assess, and align (IAA) cycle in an effort to increases in flexibility, quality, and efficiency.

A mixed method action research project reviewed the impact that agile elements had on the ADDIE model at the National Simulation Center. The working group participants underwent biweekly meetings using scrum methodology. Data collection included pre- and post-intervention interviews, weekly structured reflections, focus groups that occurred throughout the development process, and a burndown log to track performance. Additionally, the course that was created using the Agile ADDIE Framework was compared to a product that was completed using the traditional ADDIE model by a panel of instructional designers.

Participants identified that the Agile ADDIE Framework was able to create a higher-quality product in a shorter amount of time when compared to a training support package developed using the traditional ADDIE model. Several themes emerged from the data, including the Agile ADDIE Framework was perceived to be more flexible and engaging to subject matter experts. There was also a discussion involving lesson learned, limitations, and implications for both practice and the domains. Future research considerations include the implementation of the Agile ADDIE Framework in a more generalized study. This study presents a framework that enables traditional ADDIE model instructional design operations into an agile era.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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STEMSS Strategies Professional Development to Support Academic Language Acquisition

Description

This study explored the effects of a science, technology, engineering, math, and social studies (STEMSS) professional development (PD) on teachers of language learners’ (TLLs) knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching

This study explored the effects of a science, technology, engineering, math, and social studies (STEMSS) professional development (PD) on teachers of language learners’ (TLLs) knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching content and language in tandem in their classrooms. With the growing population of English learners (ELs) in today’s classrooms, it is essential TLLs have the skills to support language development while teaching content. This study investigated a face-to-face PD that developed skills in supporting ELs’ academic vocabulary development using strategies in content lessons.

This research drew upon Shulman’s (2013) Knowledge Growth in Teaching Framework by looking at content, pedagogical, and curricular knowledge with the PD building knowledge and skills in addressing these areas of knowledge through the strategies. In addition, this research drew upon Lucas and Villegas’ (2013) Linguistically Responsive Teacher Education Model that addressed how teachers gain knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy to change pedagogical practices.

Title I Kindergarten through high school TLLs voluntarily participated in the PD. A mixed methods approach was used. Quantitative data was collected using a pre, post, and maintenance survey and qualitative data was collected through a lesson analysis, fall and spring observations, snapshot surveys, and focus groups.

Results suggested that the STEMSS PD increased knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching ELs content and language using strategies that support academic vocabulary. The qualitative data supported the survey results in the increase of knowledge and skills immediately following the PD and increased self-efficacy a year following the PD. The results also suggested that the strategies supported through PD, lesson development, and time to implement may better address the needs of TLLs in the classroom.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Norming at scale: faculty perceptions of assessment culture and student learning outcomes assessment

Description

To foster both external and internal accountability, universities seek more effective models for student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). Meaningful and authentic measurement of program-level student learning outcomes requires engagement with

To foster both external and internal accountability, universities seek more effective models for student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). Meaningful and authentic measurement of program-level student learning outcomes requires engagement with an institution’s faculty members, especially to gather student performance assessment data using common scoring instruments, or rubrics, across a university’s many colleges and programs. Too often, however, institutions rely on faculty engagement for SLOA initiatives like this without providing necessary support, communication, and training. The resulting data may lack sufficient reliability and reflect deficiencies in an institution’s culture of assessment.

This mixed methods action research study gauged how well one form of SLOA training – a rubric-norming workshop – could affect both inter-rater reliability for faculty scorers and faculty perceptions of SLOA while exploring the nature of faculty collaboration toward a shared understanding of student learning outcomes. The study participants, ten part-time faculty members at the institution, each held primary careers in the health care industry, apart from their secondary role teaching university courses. Accordingly, each contributed expertise and experience to the rubric-norming discussions, surveys of assessment-related perceptions, and individual scoring of student performance with a common rubric. Drawing on sociocultural learning principles and the specific lens of activity theory, influences on faculty SLOA were arranged and analyzed within the heuristic framework of an activity system to discern effects of collaboration and perceptions toward SLOA on consistent rubric-scoring by faculty participants.

Findings suggest participation in the study did not correlate to increased inter-rater reliability for faculty scorers when using the common rubric. Constraints found within assessment tools and unclear institutional leadership prevented more reliable use of common rubrics. Instead, faculty participants resorted to individual assessment approaches to meaningfully guide students to classroom achievement and preparation for careers in the health care field. Despite this, faculty participants valued SLOA, collaborated readily with colleagues for shared assessment goals, and worked hard to teach and assess students meaningfully.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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College Success Curriculum: Helping Freshman Create New Habits

Description

Incoming freshman at East Los Angeles College were struggling with successfully completing their first semester, leading to low rates of course success and retention. Students reported struggles with adapting to

Incoming freshman at East Los Angeles College were struggling with successfully completing their first semester, leading to low rates of course success and retention. Students reported struggles with adapting to the culture of college, particularly with behaving like a college student and managing time. The purpose of this action research study was to determine if embedding a College Success Curriculum (CSC) into a required class would help students more successfully navigate the first semester. The CSC was embedded into the action-researcher's freshman composition class and covered the following concepts: appropriate classroom behavior, communication, time management, and organization. Quantitative data included retrospective pre-intervention and post-intervention survey data. Qualitative data included the researcher's journal and student-written journal entries. Findings from this study indicated that students learned to communicate via email and to prioritize their time, however, the CSC did not have a measurable effect on students’ behavior, time management, or organization. Course success and retention after receiving the CSC remained at previous years’ rates. There continues to be a need to assist freshmen students in these critical college skills, and perhaps adapt some of the strategies used in this project for future iterations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Retaining out-of-state freshmen at ASU

Description

College completion has become a national priority in the United States. Before students can graduate from a college or university, however, they must survive their first year in higher education.

College completion has become a national priority in the United States. Before students can graduate from a college or university, however, they must survive their first year in higher education. The retention of out-of-state freshmen is a major piece of the larger college student retention puzzle due to recent national enrollment trends and the financial implications of out-of-state student enrollment. With public universities nationwide receiving less financial support from state governments, many of these institutions have used a strategy of aggressively recruiting and increasingly enrolling out-of-state students because the higher tuition these students pay can help offset the loss of state funding. Despite the importance of out-of-state students to the national higher education landscape, little research has been conducted on out-of-state student retention.

This study examined the relation between a resource website and the engagement, sense of belonging, homesickness, and retention of out-of-state freshmen at Arizona State University (ASU). Mixed methods of inquiry were utilized; data sources included a pre- and post-intervention student survey, student interviews, student essay artifacts, website utilization records, and university retention reports.

This study demonstrated that freshmen coming to ASU from another state experienced four main challenges related to being an out-of-state student. Those challenges were homesickness, adjusting to living in Arizona, managing finances, and making friends at ASU. Out-of-state students therefore needed extra support for their transition. The study found that an out-of-state student resource website had a positive association with co-curricular engagement and homesickness frequency reduction. Moreover, the site provided useful information on the challenges experienced by out-of-state freshmen. Discussion includes possible explanations for the findings and implications for practice and research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Impact of Continuous Improvement in a School District

Description

The most common approach to improvement of educational systems has been the adoption of episodic initiatives and short-lived improvement programs. In recent years, a continuous improvement (CI) approach has made

The most common approach to improvement of educational systems has been the adoption of episodic initiatives and short-lived improvement programs. In recent years, a continuous improvement (CI) approach has made it onto the education scene, but the effects of continuous improvement in education remain largely unstudied. This study addressed the need to examine the long term impacts of CI in educational organizations.

Using a CI framework, this mixed methods action research (MMAR) study was conducted to examine the impact of CI on one school district’s measures of quality, stakeholder satisfaction, and cost savings, as well as to determine the value of CI leadership coaching, according to district leaders.

Qualitative data included interviews with and observations of school district leaders and the CI leadership coach. Quantitative data included stakeholder surveys, district scorecards, and state data dashboard reports. Results indicated improvement from a CI approach was slow to occur, though CI positively impacted some quality outcomes, primarily in the area of math. CI positively impacted student satisfaction, though it had minimal impact on employee and parent satisfaction. The district experienced cost savings as a result of CI, and CI leadership coaching was reported as highly valued by district leaders. The results of the study suggest a systematic CI approach and coaching support can impact change over time, but requires patience and a within district executive leader champion.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019