Matching Items (4)

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Language of the Heart: Narrative Inquiry into Indigenous Language Revitalization through Early Childhood Education

Description

This thesis examines heritage language learning and loss, and revitalization. It stems from my initial interests in Indigenous language revitalization and sustainment, bilingual education, and specifically dual language education in

This thesis examines heritage language learning and loss, and revitalization. It stems from my initial interests in Indigenous language revitalization and sustainment, bilingual education, and specifically dual language education in the United States. In this thesis, I describe my inquiry journey through narratives of the significant experiences and people I met and the scholarship I engaged in, particularly through visiting Keres Children’s Learning Center at Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico, and attending the La Cosecha Dual Language Education conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In these narratives, I also reflect on what I have learned, how I was personally impacted by what I was learning and my thoughts and ideas about particular issues. These narratives helped me gain a deeper understanding of and expand my knowledge of heritage learning, bilingual education, dual language education and critical issues of language development and promotion (or non-promotion) in our country’s schools and families. Equally important is the knowledge I gained about dual language pedagogy and its critical importance to language revitalization programs serving Indigenous children, and their families and communities. I begin my thesis with a review of literature followed by a description of my methods and then move on to my narratives of significant learning moments, chronologically, and then summarize my key findings. I end with, ironically yet crucially with the most important lesson I learned through my inquiry journey—an understanding of my linguistic self.

This thesis examines the questions of

1. To become a Dual Language Education expert, researcher, or scholar, what does it take?
2. In what ways can a non-Native help Indigenous communities engaged in indigenous language revitalization and sustainment (ILRS)? What would they need to learn or know?

Some significant findings of my thesis work include

1. The strength, versatility, and challenges of the dual language education model in a national context
2. Culturally-sustaining pedagogy and strategies for adapting lessons to local culture
3. The centrality of tribal sovereignty and tribal control over the Indigenous language in order to grow and maintain an IRLS effort
4. Ways in which a non-Native can help an ILRS initiative
5. Respect for native communities’ right to say no to research

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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An examination of Hopimomngwit: Hopi leadership

Description

The Hopi people have the distinct term mongwi applied to a person who is charged with leadership of a group. According to Hopi oral history and some contemporary Hopi thought,

The Hopi people have the distinct term mongwi applied to a person who is charged with leadership of a group. According to Hopi oral history and some contemporary Hopi thought, a mongwi (leader) or group of momngwit (leaders), gain their foremost positions in Hopi society after being recognizably able to fulfill numerous qualifications linked to their respective clan identity, ceremonial initiation, and personal conduct. Numerous occurrences related to the Hopis historical experiences have rendered a substantial record of what are considered the qualifications of a Hopi leader. This thesis is an extensive examination of the language used and the context wherein Hopi people express leadership qualities in the written and documentary record.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Art as a spiritual expression for Indigenous well-being

Description

Art is a form of spiritual expression that is thriving in many Indigenous cultures. It can take many forms, meanings and have a multitude of emotional, mental, physical and spiritual

Art is a form of spiritual expression that is thriving in many Indigenous cultures. It can take many forms, meanings and have a multitude of emotional, mental, physical and spiritual effects on its creator as well as its audience. Amongst American Indians, art has been a method for maintaining holistic well-being intended to heal and cope with traumatic experiences. In this thesis, I examine the western societal and cultural influences that have led to the loss of cultural identity and examine approaches and practices that aim to re-establish a resilient connection to identity and well-being using art as a spiritual catalyst. Literary research and articles were reviewed related to the issue of art as a form of spiritual expression in Indigenous cultures. An autoethnography was conducted with the intent to record and reflect on the well-being of the researcher in relation to her artistic expression. Journaling and vlogging were used as research methods and painting, sketching, and beading was used as artistic methods. Over the course of six months, over 50 videos with 30 hours of raw footage were recorded; averaging 2 hours per day. The results are reflected in the researchers free-flowing and emotionally driven reflection of experiences that have driven her artwork. This thesis supports the establishment of art as a form of spiritual expression for transforming the current western focused health care paradigm to one that recognizes, values and employs Indigenous insight, methodologies, worldviews, culture and spirituality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Maintaining hózhó: perceptions of physical activity, physical education and healthy living among Navajo high school students

Description

ABSTRACT

Native American populations have higher obesity and diabetes rates overall in the U.S. Percentages of obesity among Native American children were 11-25% higher than the national average. Among Navajo, cultural

ABSTRACT

Native American populations have higher obesity and diabetes rates overall in the U.S. Percentages of obesity among Native American children were 11-25% higher than the national average. Among Navajo, cultural lifestyles changes have led to less physical activity and obesity problems with youth more disassociated from traditional Navajo living, culture, beliefs, language and religion. They were at highest risk for Type II diabetes among ethnic groups due to less physically activity, increased weight gain and obesity.

This study had dual purposes: Part one of this study was to examined the perceptions of physical activity, physical education and living healthy lifestyles of Navajo adolescents, physical educators, a Navajo culture teacher, a Diné studies teacher and a community member. Part two of this study examined the physical activity patterns of Navajo adolescent students. To gain their perspectives, eight Navajo students (9-12 grades), two physical educators, two classroom teachers and one community member were recruited and interviewed individually for 60-minutes. Secondly, pedometers were used to assess the students’ physical activity levels during the school day and 24-hour increments.

Results of the part one study indicated important aspects of physical activity by Navajo adolescents, physical education teachers, classroom teachers and a community member were cultural identity, family involvement, and structure of family/extended family. Navajo respondents participated in traditional form of running in the morning, a practice performed by parents and/or extended family. Physical activity was described as active involvement of the body, movement, physical fitness, and sport related interests. Stakeholders described physical activity and healthy living as culturally driven beliefs and learning based on Navajo way of life.

Findings of part two study indicated that boys were significantly more physically active on weekday than girls t(32)=2.04, p=<.05. Weekday step counts for boys indicated (M=11,078, SD= 4,399) and for girls (M=7,567, SD=5,613). Girls were significantly more active on weekend t(27)=2.30,p=.03. Weekend step counts indicated boys and girls accumulated (M=6493, SD=5650) and (M=7589, SD=5614) steps. Physical education step counts showed minimal differences between boys (M=2203, SD=918) and girls (M=1939, SD=889) step counts. Overall results indicate that Navajo adolescents did not meet daily physical activity recommendations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015