Matching Items (19)

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Relay for Life: More Than Just a Fundraiser

Description

Cancer is a disease that has no bias based on race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, or religious beliefs. Millions upon millions of people are affected every day by this disease

Cancer is a disease that has no bias based on race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, or religious beliefs. Millions upon millions of people are affected every day by this disease in many different ways. In order to show support and raise funds for these people to help with treatment costs, housing, and much more American Cancer Society created and event called Relay for Life. Relay for Life is an event that many people may describe as a walk-a-thon fundraiser, but to those who have had a personal experience with cancer they understand that Relay is much more. Relay for Life is more than a fundraiser; it is an event that brings hope, love, and care into a community. Many people across the country show up to a Relay event to hear the success stories of those who are in remission, show support for their family and friends who are still fighting, and simply volunteer in order to further remember those that they lost to cancer.
The impacts that Relay for Life supplies go beyond monetary value and branch into the world of emotional and mental value. The stories that you hear from cancer patients, caregivers, survivors, friends, and family all show the appreciation for this event even in the smallest of communities. Looking at the Relay for Life website you can see the thousands of submissions detailing exactly why that individual participates in this event. You can read stories of sorrow, drive, friendships that have formed, and hope that has sprouted because of Relay for Life. An event such as this that celebrates the fight and works to give the world more birthdays truly empowers its participants to make a difference and make a connection with each other.
In this project, I set out to reveal the importance of Relay for Life that can be seen and heard through everyone who participates across the nation. It is important to take both personal experience and monetary value into account when looking at how Relay has had a positive impact on the lives of those affected by cancer, but when looking at the broad picture it becomes obvious how this event means more than money.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Heber, Arizona Wild Horse Public Opinion Survey

Description

This survey was used to identify the concerns of the public. There are many population techniques that the public feels are harmful to the behavior and nature of the horses.

This survey was used to identify the concerns of the public. There are many population techniques that the public feels are harmful to the behavior and nature of the horses. This research defined the different techniques and history of the situation to then analyze the public's opinion of the topic. The survey was trying to determine if any of the techniques could be accepted by the public to control the population of the horses that won’t put the forest, other species, and the herds themselves in danger of possible overpopulation effects.

The data collected from this research showed conflict for the subject. Some of the data was skewed due to conflicting viewpoints on the topic. Analyzing the other aspects of the data we saw noticed that 73% of the servers felt the horses were wild. A majority agreed that the horses should stay there and not be relocated. Some individuals who took the survey were interested in adopting out the horses to help manage horses, there were some concerns with background checks for these adopters since slaughter houses and poor living conditions is a concern.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

Heber, Arizona Wild Horse Public Opinion Survey

Description

This survey was used to identify the concerns of the public. There are many population techniques that the public feels are harmful to the behavior and nature of the horses.

This survey was used to identify the concerns of the public. There are many population techniques that the public feels are harmful to the behavior and nature of the horses. This research defined the different techniques and history of the situation to then analyze the public's opinion of the topic. The survey was trying to determine if any of the techniques could be accepted by the public to control the population of the horses that won’t put the forest, other species, and the herds themselves in danger of possible overpopulation effects.

The data collected from this research showed conflict for the subject. Some of the data was skewed due to conflicting viewpoints on the topic. Analyzing the other aspects of the data we saw noticed that 73% of the servers felt the horses were wild. A majority agreed that the horses should stay there and not be relocated. Some individuals who took the survey were interested in adopting out the horses to help manage horses, there were some concerns with background checks for these adopters since slaughter houses and poor living conditions is a concern.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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(Re) positioning Lebanese feminist discourse: a rhetorical study of Al-raida (Pioneer) journal, 1976-1985

Description

This study is a feminist historiography of Al-Raida, a Lebanese feminist journal introduced in 1976 by the Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World at the Lebanese American University.

This study is a feminist historiography of Al-Raida, a Lebanese feminist journal introduced in 1976 by the Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World at the Lebanese American University. This study recovers foundations of modern Lebanese feminist discourses as they are articulated in the journal by employing Foucauldian CDA as a means to trace discourse strands, or conversations, which include Family Planning, development, politics and narratives of the Lebanese civil war. This study explores, by situating each discourse strand within dominant and local historical contexts, the shifting rhetorical function of the journal through various historical moments. Tracing the dominant discourse strands within the first decade of the journal, this study rhetorically analyzes the ways in which arguments are positioned, research studies are presented, and methodologies are employed to forge viable solutions to Middle Eastern women's issues. First, the study traces the conversation on Family Planning in Lebanon and its relevance to the economic and social situation during the late 70s. Second, the study presents the shift in the early 80s towards a discourse on development and explores how Al-Raida presents the issue of development, attempts to define it, and in doing so outlines some of the concerns at this time, including illiteracy, access to health care, access to paid employment, and women's access to developmental opportunities. Third, the study presents the discourse in the mid-80s on the civil war in Lebanon and highlights Al-Raida's rhetorical function by documenting trauma and war narratives through personal interviews, testimonies, and ethnographies. The shift in the methodologies of the research articles published in the first decade, from quantitative studies towards qualitative studies, indicates the journal is rhetorically situated within both the dominant international discourse and within the local context, exhibiting an ability to respond to the nuances in the local Lebanese women's movement while simultaneously maintaining international visibility.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Social identity and the shift of student affairs staff to the academic unit

Description

This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The

This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The conceptual framework for this exploration was social identity theory (Tajfel, 1974), which asserts that individuals develop a self-concept or image that derives, in part, from her/his membership in a group or groups. This qualitative study utilized in-person interviews to capture raw data from four purposeful participants, and a software package (NVivo 9) aided in the grounded theory approach to data analysis (Charmaz, 2006). The study found that participants placed a high value on the college-centric approach to their student affairs work, but they still identified as student affairs professionals working inside the academic unit. Findings are useful to: supervisors who have an interest in the professional development and personal well-being of staff; faculty and administrators of master's and doctoral degree programs designed to prepare student affairs professionals; associations that serve student affairs professionals; higher education leaders engaged in organizational change; and higher education administrators interested in the roles of individual biases and values in organizations. This study will interest student affairs professionals making the shift from a student affairs unit to an academic unit, and it will inform the researcher's own practice and career development through his investigation of his own organization.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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From home to public homeplace: creating a space for working-class rhetoric in composition studies

Description

The topos of home is fraught with ideological baggage. This piece works alongside others that labor to rework home as a space for rhetorical topos. I spend the majority of

The topos of home is fraught with ideological baggage. This piece works alongside others that labor to rework home as a space for rhetorical topos. I spend the majority of my text analyzing three books from which I explicate the topos of "home." These books are Mike Rose's 1989 work Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of American's Educational Underclass, Victor Villanueva's 1993 Bootstraps: From and American Academic of Color, and Ellen Cushman's 1998 The Struggle and the Tools: Oral and Literate Strategies in an Inner City Community. I've chosen these books for two interrelated reasons. First, these texts aided in establishing working-class rhetoric as a field of study within the paradigm of rhetoric and composition. And second, in their individual ways, each of these books is anchored in a profound sense of "home." Each of the texts also experiments and resists scholarly conventions to include some autobiographical passages. Central to these passages is the topos of home, a theme that both enriches the author's autobiographical account and informs his or her theory forwarded in that work. These features add fruitful theory building to both the authors' individual texts and the paradigm as a whole. I ground my work in working-class theory, analyzing the work of Steve Parks, Nick Pollard and Nancy Welch, alongside scholarship that analyzes those labeled as "other" in higher-level academia. The stories that Parks, Pollard and Welch quote, the works of Rose, Villanueva, Cushman and even myself, all work toward discussing and creating not only a "home" for working-class academics but also room for more working-class research and theory-building. As I argue in this project, through these very acts of rhetorical/scholarly experimentation, Rose, Villanueva, and Cushman defied conventional standards for what counts as "good scholarship" in order to initiate a scholarly trajectory for working-class rhetoric in the academy. These authors' discussions of the "home" -specifically personal and political references to working-class homes--were instrumental tools in creating a public homeplace and space for further working-class theory building for rhetoricians in our field.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Writing toward published selves: teacher-writers and a practice of revision

Description

This qualitative, action research study examines how teacher-writers' identities are constructed through the practice of revision in an extra-curriculum writing group. The writing group was designed to support the teacher-writers

This qualitative, action research study examines how teacher-writers' identities are constructed through the practice of revision in an extra-curriculum writing group. The writing group was designed to support the teacher-writers as they revised classroom research projects for submission for a scholarly journal. Using discourse analysis, the researcher explores how the teacher-writers' identities are constructed in the contested spaces of revision. This exploration focuses on contested issues that invariably emerge in a dynamic binary of reader/writer, issues of authority, ownership, and unstable reader and writer identities. By negotiating these contested spaces--these contact zones--the teacher-writers construct opportunities to flex their rhetorical agency. Through rhetorical agency, the teacher-writers shift their discoursal identities by discarding and acquiring a variety of discourses. As a result, the practice of revision constructs the teacher-writers identities as hybrid, as consisting of self and other.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Moving towards a race-conscious English classroom

Description

ABSTRACT Controversies surrounding multilingual language programs, disparities on educational achievement measures, and tracking represent some of the conflicts concerning race that continue to take place in school districts around the

ABSTRACT Controversies surrounding multilingual language programs, disparities on educational achievement measures, and tracking represent some of the conflicts concerning race that continue to take place in school districts around the country. These debates are especially significant today as schools experience shifts in demographics. Racial and ethnic minorities now account for at least one-third of the nation's population (United States Census Bureau, 2010), and schools are more racially and ethnically diverse than ever before (National Center for Education Statistics, 2012). The continued importance of race in education serves as the impetus behind this dissertation's inquiries into race and language in the high school English classroom. This study explores how one group of students, attending a predominately White high school with growing racial and ethnic diversity, write and talk about race in the English classroom. I examine how explicitly or implicitly students engaged in everyday language, school talk, and school writing about racial and ethnic identity, as well as how students responded to an English language arts curriculum devoted to issues of race and equity. On a broader scale, this study seeks to understand the school, community, and larger social context of racial and ethnic division and unity, particularly the role language and literacy pedagogies can play in addressing these issues. Blending two qualitative methodologies, including ethnography and the design and implementation of a race-conscious English curriculum, I spent eight months in one high school classroom, resulting in an analysis of a series of field notes, student writing, and in-depth participant interview transcripts. Findings from this study may help complicate researchers' and teachers' notions of how racial and ethnic identity operates in classrooms with shifting demographics. This study also highlights the importance of bringing race-conscious literacy activities to the forefront of English classrooms where structured discussions and carefully crafted writing prompts can facilitate discourse on race that might otherwise be muted in the context of traditional English language arts curriculum. Finally, this dissertation calls for a greater focus on collaborative research and teaching teams comprised of classroom teachers and university researchers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Learning teaching: reciprocal learning

Description

This research is a reversal of the traditional concept of the student-teaching research experiment. Instead of studying the clear and stated goal of an apprenticeship, that of a pupil learning

This research is a reversal of the traditional concept of the student-teaching research experiment. Instead of studying the clear and stated goal of an apprenticeship, that of a pupil learning from the tutelage of a master, the focus here is on what a mentor-teacher learns from a student-teacher. During the act of teaching a novice, what can a mentor-teacher learn about her own practice, while demonstrating it to a pre-service teacher? Using the conceptual framework of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards' Architecture of Accomplished Teaching, and using it within a framework centered around cognitive coaching and reciprocal mentoring, this action research study implemented an intervention that called for series of five cognitive coaching cycles between a mentor- and student-teacher designed to foster dialogue and reflection between them. The ultimate aim of this case study was to help determine what a mentor-teacher learned about her own practice as a result of mentoring a student-teacher. Qualitative data were collected over sixteen weeks in a charter high school. Five findings were identified created after the data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach, and four conclusions were drawn about the intervention's role in the mentor-teacher's reciprocal learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Pop culture and course content: redefining genre value in first-year composition

Description

Despite its rich history in the English classroom, popular culture still does not have a strong foothold in first-year composition (FYC). Some stakeholders view popular culture as a “low-brow” topic

Despite its rich history in the English classroom, popular culture still does not have a strong foothold in first-year composition (FYC). Some stakeholders view popular culture as a “low-brow” topic of study (Bradbury, 2011), while others believe popular culture distracts students from learning about composition (Adler-Kassner, 2012). However, many instructors argue that popular culture can cultivate student interest in writing and be used to teach core concepts in composition (Alexander, 2009; Friedman, 2013; Williams, 2014). This dissertation focuses on students’ perceptions of valuable writing—particularly with regards to popular culture—and contributes to conversations about what constitutes “valuable” course content. The dissertation study, which was conducted in two sections of an FYC course during the Spring 2016 semester, uses three genre domains as a foundation: academic genres, workplace genres, and pop-culture genres. The first part of the study gauges students’ prior genre knowledge and their beliefs about the value of academic, workplace, and pop-culture genres through pre- and post-surveys. The second part of the study includes analysis of students’ remix projects to determine if and how students can meet FYC learning outcomes by working within each domain.

Through this study, as well as through frameworks in culturally sustaining pedagogy, writing studies, and genre studies, this dissertation aims to assist in the reconciliation of opposing views surrounding the content of FYC while filling in research gaps on the knowledge, interests, and perceptions of value students bring into the writing classroom. Ultimately, this dissertation explores how pop-culture composition can facilitate student learning just as well as academic and workplace composition, thereby challenging course content that has traditionally been privileged in FYC.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017