Matching Items (3)

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The Science of Qur'an Recitation with Tajweed and Tarteel, Including a Historical Background of the pre-Islamic Era and the Compilation of the Qur'an.

Description

“Recite (read)! In the name of your lord who has created all that exists” (1:96 Qur‟an). “Iqra” was the first word revealed to the Prophet of Islam (PBUH). The word

“Recite (read)! In the name of your lord who has created all that exists” (1:96 Qur‟an). “Iqra” was the first word revealed to the Prophet of Islam (PBUH). The word “iqra” is an imperative verb in Arabic, and in the context of the verse it is commanding the Prophet (PBUH) to recite. This fact carries great significance as it was the first command given to the Muslims (Ibn Kathir). Muslims believe the Qur'an is in its original form and language, Arabic. Arabic is considered to be in inexhaustible language due to its vast vocabulary and root-based origin (Humza Yusuf). Each root is typically based on three letters, which are conjugated in different ways to creating individual words. Any word in the Qur'an can be traced back to a root word, thus enhancing the meaning of each carefully chosen phrase (Ibn Kathir). The word “al-Qur'an”, means, the book that is recited, therefore, it is fitting that the first verse revealed pertains to its recital. According to history the majority of civilizations were built off scripture or books. The Greeks had Homer, the Egyptians had hieroglyphics, the Christians had the Bible, and the Hebrews had the Torah. Interestingly enough, the Pre-Islamic Arabs were an ancient civilization with no book; the Qur'an was the first book in Arabic history. This was earthshattering for the Arabs of the time, as it was something new and went against the tradition, however, the revelation of the Qur'an proved to be the most influential occurrence in the Arab history. The Qur'an is a literary masterpiece, flaunting its superior style forming moving and powerful verses. The layout of the Qur'an is quite simple, as it contains thirty parts, called ajzaa (juz singular), which altogether make up 114 chapters, called surahs (Humza Yusuf). The beginning surahs are longer, and the verses are lengthy, while the latter surahs are much shorter and the verses are succinct and direct (Qur'an al Kareem). Each verse is known as an “ayah, ayaat (pl)” directly translated to mean a “sign” or a “miracle” in the Arabic language. There are over 6,600 ayaat in the Qur'an, ranging from some just one or two words, while others are hundreds of words. Each surah, has a general theme, and each surah is given at least one title, while a few surahs have more than one title (Humza Yusuf).

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Date Created
  • 2012-12

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Translation of the Second Half of "Inimitability of the Quran, Between Theory and Application"

Description

The goal of this project is to translate a philosophical book that discusses the inimitavility of the Holy Qur'an from a philosophical perspective. Half of the book "Inimitability of the

The goal of this project is to translate a philosophical book that discusses the inimitavility of the Holy Qur'an from a philosophical perspective. Half of the book "Inimitability of the Qur'an, between theory and application" by Mahmud Ni'mah Al-Jayyashi, was found to be the ideal choice for the project; thus, the specified part was translated. In the preface, the book discussed divisions of miracles and found that the Qur'an is an intellectual miracle. Then in the first chapter it discussed the aspects and foundations of miracles. It listed most of the inimitable aspects of the Holy Qur'an which were mentioned by different Muslin scholars. In the second chapter, it discussed the author's view of the main inimitable aspects of the Holy Qur'an. It also discussed the elements of the Qur'anic challenge by whom the Qur'an was sent, the no-contradiction challenge, and the pure and eloquent style of the Holy Qur'an.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Education and curricular perspectives in the Qurʼan

Description

In this dissertation I attempt to find elements of education and curricular perspective in the Qur'an. I argue that there is little research in the field of curriculum instruction that

In this dissertation I attempt to find elements of education and curricular perspective in the Qur'an. I argue that there is little research in the field of curriculum instruction that discusses the Qur'an's educational aspects and, as a result, much ignorance of the Qur'an's material that deals with education and curricular perspective in the Qur'an. Researchers may find many materials that deal with reading, memorizing, and reciting the Qur'an, along with references that deal with science and math in the Qur'an. Therefore, this dissertation answers the question: What curriculum exists within the Quran? This dissertation is divided into five chapters exploring various aspects of the curriculum. The word "curriculum" is used in one chapter to mean developing the person as a whole in all aspects of life whether spiritual, social, or mental while in the other chapter curriculum is used to refer to methods of instruction. I concluded that curriculum in the Qur'an uses different methods of instructions to develop the individual as a whole in all aspects of life while granting freedom of choice.

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Date Created
  • 2013