Matching Items (16)

128047-Thumbnail Image.png

Field induced changes in the ring/chain equilibrium of hydrogen bonded structures: 5-methyl-3-heptanol

Description

Using non-linear dielectric techniques, we have measured the dynamics of 5-methyl-3-heptanol at a temperature at which the Kirkwood correlation factor g[subscript K] indicates the coexistence of ring- and chain-like hydrogen-bonded

Using non-linear dielectric techniques, we have measured the dynamics of 5-methyl-3-heptanol at a temperature at which the Kirkwood correlation factor g[subscript K] indicates the coexistence of ring- and chain-like hydrogen-bonded structures. Steady state permittivity spectra recorded in the presence of a high dc bias electric field (17 MV/m) reveal that both the amplitude and the time constant are increased by about 10% relative to the low field limit. This change is attributed to the field driven conversion from ring-like to the more polar chain-like structures, and a direct observation of its time dependence shows that the ring/chain structural transition occurs on a time scale that closely matches that of the dielectric Debye peak. This lends strong support to the picture that places fluctuations of the end-to-end vector of hydrogen bonded structures at the origin of the Debye process, equivalent to fluctuations of the net dipole moment or g[subscript K]. Recognizing that changes in the ring/chain equilibrium constant also impact the spectral separation between Debye and α-process may explain the difference in their temperature dependence whenever g[subscript K] is sensitive to temperature, i.e., when the structural motifs of hydrogen bonding change considerably.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-08-16

128503-Thumbnail Image.png

Strain induced fragility transition in metallic glass

Description

Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here,

Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here, we report that mechanical strain in a model metallic glass modulates the relaxation dynamics in unexpected ways. We find that a large strain amplitude makes a fragile liquid become stronger, reduces dynamical heterogeneity at the glass transition and broadens the loss spectra asymmetrically, in addition to speeding up the relaxation dynamics. These findings demonstrate the distinctive roles of strain compared with temperature on the relaxation dynamics and indicate that dynamical heterogeneity inherently relates to the fragility of glass-forming materials.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05-18

156706-Thumbnail Image.png

Detection and surface reactivity of engineered nanoparticles in water

Description

Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) pose risk potentials, if they exist in water systems at significant concentrations and if they remain reactive to cause toxicity. Three goals guided this study: (1)

Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) pose risk potentials, if they exist in water systems at significant concentrations and if they remain reactive to cause toxicity. Three goals guided this study: (1) establishing NP detecting methods with high sensitivity to tackle low concentration and small sizes, (2) achieving assays capable of measuring NP surface reactivity and identifying surface reaction mechanisms, and (3) understanding the impact of surface adsorption of ions on surface reactivity of NPs in water.

The size detection limit of single particle inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (spICP-MS) was determined for 40 elements, demonstrating the feasibility of spICP-MS to different NP species in water. The K-means Clustering Algorithm was used to process the spICP-MS signals, and achieved precise particle-noise differentiation and quantitative particle size resolution. A dry powder assay based on NP-catalyzed methylene blue (MB) reduction was developed to rapidly and sensitively detect metallic NPs in water by measuring their catalytic reactivity.

Four different wet-chemical-based NP surface reactivity assays were demonstrated: “borohydride reducing methylene blue (BHMB)”, “ferric reducing ability of nanoparticles (FRAN)”, “electron paramagnetic resonance detection of hydroxyl radical (EPR)”, and “UV-illuminated methylene blue degradation (UVMB)”. They gave different reactivity ranking among five NP species, because they targeted for different surface reactivity types (catalytic, redox and photo reactivity) via different reaction mechanisms. Kinetic modeling frameworks on the assay outcomes revealed two surface electron transfer schemes, namely the “sacrificial reducing” and the “electrode discharging”, and separated interfering side reactions from the intended surface reaction.

The application of NPs in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was investigated as an industrial case to understand NP surface transformation via adsorbing ions in water. Simulation of wastewater treatment showed CMP NPs were effectively removed (>90%) by lime softening at high pH and high calcium dosage, but 20-40% of them remained in water after biomass adsorption process. III/V ions (InIII, GaIII, and AsIII/V) derived from semiconductor materials showed adsorption potentials to common CMP NPs (SiO2, CeO2 and Al2O3), and a surface complexation model was developed to determine their intrinsic complexation constants for different NP species. The adsorption of AsIII and AsV ions onto CeO2 NPs mitigated the surface reactivity of CeO2 NPs suggested by the FRAN and EPR assays. The impact of the ion adsorption on the surface reactivity of CeO2 NPs was related to the redox state of Ce and As on the surface, but varied with ion species and surface reaction mechanisms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

157424-Thumbnail Image.png

Nonlinear dielectric effects and modification of supramolecular structures in monohydroxy alcohols

Description

A driving force for studies of water, alcohols, and amides is the determination of the role of hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonds can break and reform, consequently creating supramolecular structures. Understanding

A driving force for studies of water, alcohols, and amides is the determination of the role of hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonds can break and reform, consequently creating supramolecular structures. Understanding the role supramolecular structures play in the dynamics of monohydroxyl alcohols is important to understanding hydrogen bonding in more complex systems such as proteins. Since many monohydroxyl alcohols are good glass formers, dielectric spectroscopy in the supercooled regime is used to gather information about the dynamics of these liquids. Application of high external fields will reversibly alter the polarization responses of the material from the linear response. This results in nonlinear dielectric effects (NDE) such as field induced suppression (saturation) and enhancement of amplitudes (chemical effects) as well as shifts in the time constants toward slower (entropy) and faster (energy absorption) dynamics.

The first part of this thesis describes the nonlinear dielectric experiments on monohydroxyl alcohols, with an emphasis on the time dependence of NDEs. For the first time, time-dependent experiments on monoalcohols were done, the results showed that NDEs occur on the Debye time scale. Furthermore, physical vapor deposition (PVD) is used to modify the supramolecular structure of 4-methyl-3-heptanol. Upon deposition the film cannot form the ring like structures, which are preferred in the bulk material. The as deposited film shows an enhancement of the dielectric peak by a factor of approximately 11 when compared to the bulk material. The conversion from the as deposited material back to the near bulk material was found to occur on the Debye timescale.

The second part of this thesis focuses on the question of what is governing the field induced changes seen in the liquids studied. Here a complete set of high field experiments on highly polar propylene carbonate derivatives were performed. It was demonstrated that these materials exhibit a Debye-like peak and using a combination of Adam-Gibbs and Fröhlich’s definition of entropy, proposed by Johari [G.P. Johari, J. Chem. Phys 138, 154503 (2013)], cannot solely be used to describe a frustration of dynamics. It is important to note that although these material exhibit a Debye like peak, the behavior is much different than monoalcohols.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

154771-Thumbnail Image.png

Solvent electrostatic response: from simple solutes to proteins

Description

How water behaves at interfaces is relevant to many scientific and technological applications; however, many subtle phenomena are unknown in aqueous solutions. In this work, interfacial structural transition in hydration

How water behaves at interfaces is relevant to many scientific and technological applications; however, many subtle phenomena are unknown in aqueous solutions. In this work, interfacial structural transition in hydration shells of a polarizable solute at critical polarizabilities is discovered. The transition is manifested in maximum water response, the reorientation of the water dipoles at the interface, and an increase in the density of dangling OH bonds. This work also addresses the role of polarizability of the active site of proteins in biological catalytic reactions. For proteins, the hydration shell becomes very heterogeneous and involves a relatively large number of water molecules. The molecular dynamics simulations show that the polarizability, along with the atomic charge distribution, needs to be a part of the picture describing how enzymes work. Non Gaussian dynamics in time-resolved linear and nonlinear (correlation) 2D spectra are also analyzed.

Additionally, a theoretical formalism is presented to show that when preferential orientations of water dipoles exist at the interface, electrophoretic charges can be produced without free charge carriers, i.e., neutral solutes can move in a constant electric field due to the divergence of polarization at the interface. Furthermore, the concept of interface susceptibility is introduced. It involves the fluctuations of the surface charge density caused by thermal motion and its correlation over the characteristic correlation length with the fluctuations of the solvent charge density. Solvation free energy and interface dielectric constant are formulated accordingly. Unlike previous approaches, the solvation free energy scales quite well in a broad range of ion sizes, namely in the range of 2-14 A° . Interface dielectric constant is defined such that the boundary conditions in the Laplace equation describing a micro- or mesoscopic interface are satisfied. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value. Molecular dynamics simulation results show that the interface dielectric constant for a TIP3P water model changes from nine to four when the effective solute radius is increased from 5 A° to 18 A° . The small value of the interface dielectric constant of water has potentially dramatic consequences for hydration.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

155751-Thumbnail Image.png

A comparative study of gold bonding via electronic spectroscopy

Description

The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects. To understand this facet on bonding, a series of simple diatomic AuX (X=F, Cl, O

The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects. To understand this facet on bonding, a series of simple diatomic AuX (X=F, Cl, O and S) molecules, where upon bond formation the Au atom donates or accepts electrons, was investigated and discussed in this thesis.

First, the optical field-free, Stark, and Zeeman spectroscopic studies have been performed on AuF and AuCl. The simple polar bonds between Au and typical halogens (i.e. F and Cl) can be well characterized by the electronic structure studies and the permanent electric dipole moments, el. The spectroscopic parameters have been precisely determined for the [17.7]1, [17.8]0+ and X1+ states of AuF, and the [17.07]1, [17.20]0+ and X1+ states of AuCl. The el have been determined for ground and excited states of AuF and AuCl. The results from the hyperfine analysis and Stark measurement support the assignments that the [17.7]1 and [17.8]0+ states of AuF are the components of a 3 state. Similarly, the analysis demonstrated the [19.07]1 and [19.20]0+ states are the components of the 3 state of AuCl.

Second, my study focused on AuO and AuS because the bonding between gold and sulfur/oxygen is a key component to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. The high-resolution spectra were record and analyzed to obtain the geometric and electronic structural data for the ground and excited states. The electric dipole moment, el, and the magnetic dipole moment, m, has been the precisely measured by applying external static electric and magnetic fields. el andm are used to give insight into the unusual complex bonding in these molecules.

In addition to direct studies on the gold-containing molecules, other studies of related molecules are included here as well. These works contain the pure rotation measurement of PtC, the hyperfine and Stark spectroscopic studies of PtF, and the Stark and Zeeman spectroscopic studies of MgH and MgD.

Finally, a perspective discussion and conclusion will summarize the results of AuF, AuCl, AuO, and AuS from this work (bond lengths, dipole moment, etc.). The highly quantitative information derived from this work is the foundation of a chemical description of matter and essential for kinetic energy manipulation via Stark and Zeeman interactions. This data set also establishes a synergism with computation chemists who are developing new methodologies for treating relativistic effects and electron correlation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

153198-Thumbnail Image.png

Molecular polarizability as a descriptor for molecular conductance

Description

We studied the relationship between the polarizability and the molecular conductance

that arises in the response of a molecule to an external electric field. To illustrate

the plausibility of the idea, we

We studied the relationship between the polarizability and the molecular conductance

that arises in the response of a molecule to an external electric field. To illustrate

the plausibility of the idea, we used Simmons' tunneling model, which describes image

charge and dielectric effects on electron transport through a barrier. In such a

model, the barrier height depends on the dielectric constant of the electrode-molecule-electrode junction, which in turn can be approximately expressed in terms of the

molecular polarizability via the classical Clausius-Mossotti relation. In addition to

using the tunneling model, the validity of the relationships between the molecular

polarizability and the molecular conductance was tested by comparing calculated

and experimentally measured conductance of different chemical structures ranging

from covalent bonded to non-covalent bonded systems. We found that either using

the tunneling model or the first-principle calculated quantities or experimental data,

the conductance decreases as the molecular polarizability increases. In contrast to

this strong correlation, our results showed that in some cases there was a weaker or

none correlation between the conductance and other molecular electronic properties

including HOMO-LUMO gap, chemical geometries, and interactions energies. All

these results together suggest that using the molecular polarizability as a molecular

descriptor for conductance can offer some advantages compared to using other

molecular electronic properties and can give additional insight about the electronic

transport property of a junction.

These results also show the validity of the physically intuitive picture that to a first

approximation a molecule in a junction behaves as a dielectric that is polarized in the

opposite sense of the applied bias, thereby creating an interfacial barrier that hampers

tunneling. The use of the polarizability as a descriptor of molecular conductance offers

signicant conceptual and practical advantages over a picture based in molecular

orbitals. Despite the simplicity of our model, it sheds light on a hitherto neglected

connection between molecular polarizability and conductance and paves the way for

further conceptual and theoretical developments.

The results of this work was sent to two publications. One of them was accepted

in the International Journal of Nanotechnology (IJNT) and the other is still under

review in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

157156-Thumbnail Image.png

Optical spectroscopy of heavy element containing molecules in support of fundamental physics

Description

Transient molecules are of great importance having proposed applications in quantum science and technology and tests of fundamental physics. In the present dissertation, the transient molecules studied are SrOH, ThF,

Transient molecules are of great importance having proposed applications in quantum science and technology and tests of fundamental physics. In the present dissertation, the transient molecules studied are SrOH, ThF, ThCl, YbF and YbOH; each having been selected because of their proposed application. Specifically, SrOH is a candidate of constructing a molecular magneto-optical trap (MOT). The simple actinide molecules, ThF and ThCl, were selected as ligand bonding model systems to gain insight into chemical processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel. The lanthanides YbF and YbOH are venues for the determination of electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) and the studies in this dissertation provide the requisite properties for those experiments.

Intense supersonic molecular beams of these transient molecules were generated via laser ablation and spectroscopically characterized using a novel medium-resolution two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopic approach, as well as high-resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The 2D medium resolution approach, which was used in the studies SrOH, ThF, ThCl and YbOH, uses a multiplexing method that simultaneously records dispersed fluorescence and excitation spectra. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that all the electronics states can be targeted to determine the electronics states and associated vibrational spacing individually. Consequently, in the 2D spectra of ThF, ThCl and YbOH, several previously unobserved band systems have been detected in one single scan. For the DF spectra of SrOH and YbOH, the determined branching ratios show that the transitions of these molecules are diagonal (i.e. Δv=0), which is essential for the proposed potential for laser cooling. In the high-resolution of YbF, ThF, ThCl and SrOH optical spectra were recorded to an accuracy of ±30 MHz, which represents an unprecedented precision of 1:10+8.

In addition to field free spectra, optical Stark and Zeeman studies were performed to determine the most fundamental magneto-and electro-static properties. Effective Hamiltonian operators were employed to analyze the recorded spectra and determine the spectroscopic parameters. This data set also establishes a contribution toward developing new computational methodologies for treating relativistic effects and electron correlation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

151219-Thumbnail Image.png

Heating glass-forming materials by time dependent electric fields

Description

The disordered nature of glass-forming melts results in two features for its dynamics i.e. non-Arrhenius and non-exponential behavior. Their macroscopic properties are studied through observing spatial heterogeneity of the molecular

The disordered nature of glass-forming melts results in two features for its dynamics i.e. non-Arrhenius and non-exponential behavior. Their macroscopic properties are studied through observing spatial heterogeneity of the molecular relaxation. Experiments performed in a low-frequency range tracks the flow of energy in time on slow degrees of freedom and transfer to the vibrational heat bath of the liquid, as is the case for microwave heating. High field measurements on supercooled liquids result in generation of fictive temperatures of the absorbing modes which eventually result in elevated true bath temperatures. The absorbed energy allows us to quantify the changes in the 'configurational', real sample, and electrode temperatures. The slow modes absorb energy on the structural relaxation time scale causing the increase of configurational temperature resulting in the rise of dielectric loss. Time-resolved high field dielectric relaxation experiments show the impact of 'configurational heating' for low frequencies of the electric field and samples that are thermally clamped to a thermostat. Relevant thermal behavior of monohydroxy alcohols is considerably different from the cases of simple non-associating liquids, due to their distinct origins of the prominent dielectric loss. Monohydroxy alcohols display very small changes due to observed nonthermal effects without increasing sample temperature. These changes have been reflected in polymers in our measurements.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

151012-Thumbnail Image.png

Evaluation of epoxy nanocomposites for high voltage insulation

Description

Polymeric materials containing nanometer (nm) size particles are being introduced to provide compact shapes for low and medium voltage insulation equipment. The nanocomposites may provide superior electrical performance when compared

Polymeric materials containing nanometer (nm) size particles are being introduced to provide compact shapes for low and medium voltage insulation equipment. The nanocomposites may provide superior electrical performance when compared with those available currently, such as lower dielectric losses and increased dielectric strength, tracking and erosion resistance, and surface hydrophobicity. All of the above mentioned benefits can be achieved at a lower filler concentration (< 10%) than conventional microfillers (40-60%). Also, the uniform shapes of nanofillers provide a better electrical stress distribution as compared to irregular shaped microcomposites which can have high internal electric stress, which could be a problem for devices with active electrical parts. Improvement in electrical performance due to addition of nanofillers in an epoxy matrix has been evaluated in this work. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was done on the epoxy samples to confirm uniform dispersion of nano-sized fillers as good filler dispersion is essential to realize the above stated benefits. Dielectric spectroscopy experiments were conducted over a wide range of frequencies as a function of temperature to understand the role of space charge and interfaces in these materials. The experiment results demonstrate significant reduction in dielectric losses in samples containing nanofillers. High voltage experiments such as corona resistance tests were conducted over 500 hours to monitor degradation in the samples due to corona. These tests revealed improvements in partial discharge endurance of nanocomposite samples. These improvements could not be adequately explained using a macroscopic quantity such as thermal conductivity. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed higher weight loss initiation temperatures for nanofilled samples which is in agreement with the corona resistance experimental results. Theoretical models have also been developed in this work to complement the results of the corona resistance experiment and the TGA analysis. Degradation model was developed to map the erosion path using Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. A thermal model was developed to calculate the localized temperature distribution in the micro and nano-filled samples using the PDE toolbox in MATLAB. Both the models highlight the fact that improvement in nanocomposites is not limited to the filler concentrations that were tested experimentally.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012