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Compassion Fatigue in Higher Education: The Problem No One is Talking About

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Traditionally when the topic of secondary traumatic stress (STS) is discussed, it is often in regard to medical professionals and first responders. People who have STS or compassion fatigue,

Traditionally when the topic of secondary traumatic stress (STS) is discussed, it is often in regard to medical professionals and first responders. People who have STS or compassion fatigue, as it has been renamed, have been defined as people who are dealing with traumatic stress and/or emotional burdens via their “patients.” This study, conducted at a major university in the southwest, measured educators’ perceptions of the extent of their compassion fatigue using the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL) before and after a voluntary online support training during last four weeks of the semester. Educators who were full time scored better than the educators who worked part time on the three components of the Compassion Fatigue Scale. Results from this study suggest that additional training surrounding compassion fatigue may be needed in the future.

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Date Created
  • 2019

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Faculty Mentoring in an Academic Success Program

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ABSTRACT

Over the past decades, there has been growth in student academic success programs in institutions of higher learning. However, with this growth instructors in these programs have not always been

ABSTRACT

Over the past decades, there has been growth in student academic success programs in institutions of higher learning. However, with this growth instructors in these programs have not always been prepared to teach courses focused on supporting student academic success. The purpose of this study was to understand the role that mentoring plays in the performance of new faculty in the Success Courses department at Arizona State University. The guiding questions of the study examined the degree to which mentoring affected instructors’ efficacy in implementing the core tenets of the Success Courses Department and the features of the mentoring program that new instructors found useful. I used an action research, mixed method approach with focus groups, interviews, and surveys serving as data collection tools. The participants in the study were new department faculty mentees who taught for the Success Courses department at ASU in the fall of 2018. The quantitative data suggested that the faculty mentoring program helped new instructors improve their understanding of their students and the classroom environment. The qualitative findings indicated that faculty mentoring provided overall support, enhanced preparedness to deliver course content, created opportunities for professional growth and development, and supported positive relationships and collaboration. The faculty mentoring program enhanced the development of relationships between mentors and mentees, which is important for assisting new instructors as they seek to address individual challenges related to their teaching practices.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019