Matching Items (5)

134610-Thumbnail Image.png

Residential Colleges and First-Year Experience: A Case Study of the Honors Arts Residential College Model at Barrett, the Honors College

Description

Undergraduate on-campus residential education is a topic of significant inquiry within the field of higher education, and specifically student affairs. It has become commonplace for institutions of higher education in

Undergraduate on-campus residential education is a topic of significant inquiry within the field of higher education, and specifically student affairs. It has become commonplace for institutions of higher education in the United States to leverage the intersections between academics and residence life in order to promote student success by offering on-campus housing options that strategically place students in residential communities that provide additional connection to the students' academic experience, often by major, college, department, or other focus areas. Such models vary by institution, but are often referred to as living-learning communities or residential colleges, depending upon their structure and goals. For example, Barrett, the Honors College on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University implements a residential college model within its student housing; honors students live and study together, with the addition of three "special communities" designed for students majoring in Engineering, Business, or the Arts. This honors thesis case study describes and investigates the impact the visual and performing arts Barrett residential community has upon its residents in their first-year college experience. Through the lens of student development theory, this research focuses upon examining this specific residential community in detail in order to gain an understanding of its effect upon residents' academic and personal well being.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

135161-Thumbnail Image.png

Sex Trafficking Victim Identification in the Medical Setting

Description

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (2014) estimated that one in six runaways were likely to be victims of sex trafficking. Nearly 88% of trafficking survivors reported having

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (2014) estimated that one in six runaways were likely to be victims of sex trafficking. Nearly 88% of trafficking survivors reported having some kind of contact with the health care system while they were trafficked (Lederer & Wetzel, 2014). In this study, the Office of Sex Trafficking Intervention Research at Arizona State University is attempting to determine the knowledge medical students and healthcare professionals have on identification of a sex trafficking victim and methods of reporting these situations within their organizations. To explore the knowledge providers and students have on sex trafficking victim identification as well as reporting protocols, our office sent out an online, anonymous survey to current medical students and healthcare professionals in the United States. The survey results will assist in the development of a training curriculum addressing the identification of sex trafficking victims within a medical setting and how to report within organizations. The anticipated outcome of this study was that medical students and healthcare professionals have not had training or continuing education on identifying a potential sex trafficking victim.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

148258-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis of Student Stress Before and During COVID-19

Description

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other relationships to stress. We obtained our data by conducting a survey through Google Forms that was exclusively accessible to ASU students. Stress levels were measured with the use of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). We find that the stress of ASU students from before the pandemic to during rises from 15 to 22 points, a 50% increase (n = 228). We discovered that women are more stressed than men before and during the pandemic. We also discovered that there is no difference between stresses among different races. We notice that there is a parabolic relationship between enrollment time and stress levels with the peak occurring during semesters 2-6. We also conclude that students who attended more than 5 events during the pandemic had lower stress scores, and those who had their videos on for at least 3 events had lower stress scores. Furthermore, students who utilized campus resources to manage their stress had higher stress levels than those who did not.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

148307-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis of Student Stress Before and During COVID-19

Description

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other relationships to stress. We obtained our data by conducting a survey through Google Forms that was exclusively accessible to ASU students. Stress levels were measured with the use of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). We find that the stress of ASU students from before the pandemic to during rises from 15 to 22 points, a 50% increase (n = 228). We discovered that women are more stressed than men before and during the pandemic. We also discovered that there is no difference between stresses among different races. We notice that there is a parabolic relationship between enrollment time and stress levels with the peak occurring during semesters 2-6. We also conclude that students who attended more than 5 events during the pandemic had lower stress scores, and those who had their videos on for at least 3 events had lower stress scores. Furthermore, students who utilized campus resources to manage their stress had higher stress levels than those who did not.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

148315-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis of Student Stress Before and During COVID-19

Description

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other

The mental health of ASU students has been negatively affected by the pandemic. Our research looks to prove that COVID-19 has caused an increase in stress levels while uncovering other relationships to stress. We obtained our data by conducting a survey through Google Forms that was exclusively accessible to ASU students. Stress levels were measured with the use of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). We find that the stress of ASU students from before the pandemic to during rises from 15 to 22 points, a 50% increase (n = 228). We discovered that women are more stressed than men before and during the pandemic. We also discovered that there is no difference between stresses among different races. We notice that there is a parabolic relationship between enrollment time and stress levels with the peak occurring during semesters 2-6. We also conclude that students who attended more than 5 events during the pandemic had lower stress scores, and those who had their videos on for at least 3 events had lower stress scores. Furthermore, students who utilized campus resources to manage their stress had higher stress levels than those who did not.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05