Matching Items (6)

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The Effect of a Resiliency Training on Vicarious Trauma in Law Enforcement

Description

Vicarious exposure to traumatic events is correlated with: mental health problems, a higher prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, employee attrition, and higher mortality rates for Law Enforcement Officers when compared

Vicarious exposure to traumatic events is correlated with: mental health problems, a higher prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, employee attrition, and higher mortality rates for Law Enforcement Officers when compared to the general population. The purpose of this evidence-based project was to determine if a resiliency training improved resiliency and resiliency knowledge in law enforcement officers in a rural law enforcement agency in the southwestern United States. Six participants completed a demographic survey, Response to Stressful Experience Scale and a resiliency knowledge measure. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted to compare pre- and post- training resiliency and resiliency knowledge scores.

The post-test overall resiliency scores (Mdn = 59.50) were not significantly higher than pre-test overall resiliency scores (Mdn = 54.50), Z = -1.47, p = .141. Post-test resiliency knowledge scores (Mdn = 9.00) were not significantly higher than pre-test resiliency knowledge scores (Mdn = 8.00), Z = -1.63, p = .102. In this group of law enforcement officers, the resiliency training did not have an effect on resiliency or resiliency knowledge. These outcomes could be potentially explained by the limited sample size (N = 6), and possibly small effect size. Recommendations for improving the current study include conducting the resiliency training with a larger sample size of at least 30, and including additional relevant questions in the resiliency knowledge measure.

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  • 2020-04-14

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Heart Failure Education in A VA Outpatient Clinic Delivered as Part of a Multidisciplinary Heart Failure Management Team

Description

There is an estimated 6.2 million people Americans over the age of 20 suffering from Heart Failure (HF) (Bejamin et. al., 2019). It is essential that HF patients have sufficient

There is an estimated 6.2 million people Americans over the age of 20 suffering from Heart Failure (HF) (Bejamin et. al., 2019). It is essential that HF patients have sufficient knowledge about the disease and self-management (Abbasi, Ghezeljeh, & Farahani, 2018; Dinh, Bonner, Ramsbotham & Clark, 2018). Lack of self-management is largely to blame for many HF exacerbations. Current evidence supports utilizing both verbal and written education with an emphasis on self-care and education delivered in a group setting or individual setting showed equal impact on self-care and HF knowledge ( Hoover, et. al., 2017; Ross et. al., 2015; Tawalbeh, 2018).

An outpatient VA clinic located in a suburb of the large metropolitan identified there was no consistency on how a HF patient was educated, managed, or tracked and the registered nurses (RNs) lacked knowledge of HF. As a results of these findings this Evidence Based Project (EBP) was implemented. RNs were educated on HF and completed a self-assessment questionnaire evaluating their knowledge pre and post education. The RNs, as part of a multidisciplinary team, educated HF patients on signs and symptoms of HF as well as on how to manage the disease. Patients completed, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) to assess quality of life and the Self Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) to assess knowledge of HF and self-management skills.

These questionnaires were completed initially and at 30 and 60 day intervals. The RNs self-assessment of their knowledge and ability to educate patients increased in all areas. The patient’s KCCQ and SCHFI score improved at 30 days and 60 days when compared to their initial score. Larger EBPs are needed over a longer period of time to assess the impact on hospital readmissions and same day clinic visits for HF exhibitions.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Heart Failure Anticoagulation Teach-Back Education and Readmissions

Description

Heart failure affects millions of Americans each year. Treatment of advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and left ventricular failure is sometimes treated with implantation of a left-ventricular assist

Heart failure affects millions of Americans each year. Treatment of advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and left ventricular failure is sometimes treated with implantation of a left-ventricular assist device. While living with this life-sustaining machine, anticoagulation with Coumadin is necessary. Many of these patients are readmitted within 30-days of being discharged for pump clots, gastro-intestinal bleeds and even strokes. Patients are often discharged without adequate education on Coumadin management, which promotes inadequate self-care and medication non-adherence.

In current practice, healthcare providers lecture information in a quick manner without the evaluation of patients’ comprehension. Research suggests implementing the teach-back method during education sessions to assess for comprehension of material to improve medication adherence. Healthcare providers should implement Coumadin teach-back education to heart failure patients with left-ventricular assist devices to improve quality of life, increase medication adherence and decrease 30-day hospital readmission rates.

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Date Created
  • 2020-04-25

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Advance Practice Nursing in the Pre-Hospital Setting

Description

Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is expected to increase at a rate of 1.9% yearly, leading to the inability to provide efficient and timely care, causing preventable medical errors and delays

Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is expected to increase at a rate of 1.9% yearly, leading to the inability to provide efficient and timely care, causing preventable medical errors and delays in time sensitive care. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality estimates that 21-33% of all ED visits are non-emergent and increased age correlates with increased use of Pre-hospital EMS systems and emergency rooms. This study aimed to determine if an advance practice nurse (APN) in an older adult pre-hospital setting could reduce the use of 911 for non-urgent calls and transports, using the para-medicine model of care. Available evidence demonstrated a decrease in non-urgent transports with potential for significant savings to the healthcare system.

This study was conducted in a community where 86.3% of residents are over the age of 65. The local fire department employed a full time APN who evaluated patients identified by EMS crews as at risk for repeat use of the 911 system. Following a 911 call and a referral by medics, the APN contacted patients to arrange a home visit. The purpose served to evaluate current health status, risks, and gaps in care. Interventions included assistance reducing safety concerns, assistance with coordination of care, and working with patient primary care providers to meet patient needs. Data collection included patient age, gender, number of 911 calls 30 days prior and 30 days post intervention, number of ambulance transports following intervention and PEI score after the initial APN visit.

Six patients (32%) accepted the intervention and 13 or (68%) refused the intervention, with a mean age of 86 years of age. Wilcoxin signed rank test indicates the number of pre-intervention 911 calls was statistically significantly higher than the number of post-intervention 911 calls. Z= -2.23, Asymp. Sig. (2 tailed) = 0.03. A Fisher’s exact test and Pearson’s Chai squared test did not demonstrate a statistical significance in the number of ambulance transports, which could be attributed to the low participation rate in the intervention (n=6). These results indicate that an APN in the pre-hospital setting can have an impact on use of 911 calls for non-urgent problems and. Furthermore, the ability to assist with care coordination and advocate for available services within the circle of the medical home closes gaps in care that are currently left unfilled.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05-01

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Advance Care Planning: Providing Direction for Patients and Providers

Description

Many older Americans don’t have an advance directive (AD). ADs are legal documents that allow a person to express what types of medical treatment or cares that they want

Many older Americans don’t have an advance directive (AD). ADs are legal documents that allow a person to express what types of medical treatment or cares that they want at the end of their life if they were unable to speak for themselves. Patients without an AD could receive unwanted treatment. Providers can utilize advance care planning (ACP) to educate patients and support them in forming a medical power of attorney (MPOA) and AD. Evidence suggests that having ACP conversations can engage a patient to form an AD. The purpose of this project was to see if ACP discussions with older patients encouraged them to complete an AD and MPOA.

The project used a mixed method design. Participants were recruited from a primary care practice. Descriptive statistics described the sample and outcome variable. An independent t- test measured if there were significant changes in the participant responses for the ACP survey.

The average age (standard deviation) of the chart review sample was 72.22 (SD=9.47). The ages ranged from 60 to 100 years of age. Most of the sample in the chart audit were female with 105 (53%) participants and 95 (48%) were male. Most of the sample, 183 (92.5%) reported having a chronic health condition and 17 (7.5%) of the sample reported having no chronic condition. Overall, the results were inclined towards a significant difference in participants who did the ACP discussions and those who did not when comparing completed AD forms.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05-01

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Evaluating the Effect of a Heart Failure Cardiac Rehabilitation Intervention on Hospital Readmission Rates

Description

Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common and costly conditions for hospital readmissions in the United States (Conway, 2015). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are effective in decreasing hospital

Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common and costly conditions for hospital readmissions in the United States (Conway, 2015). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are effective in decreasing hospital readmission rates (Koukoui, Desmoulin, Lairy, Bleinc, Boursiquot, Galinier, & Koukoui, 2015). Medicare has established new requirements for qualification into a CR program; thus, patients are at risk for readmission in the six-weeks post discharge. To reduce HF hospital readmissions and to increase enrollment into the HF program, an infrastructure was implemented beginning in January 2016. This quality improvement project employed a patient chart audit reviewing overall hospital readmission rates for HF at a large hospital in Arizona.

A comparison of readmission rates was made between the 6 months prior to, and the 6-months after the expanded utilization of the HF program. An independent-samples t test was calculated comparing the mean score of the readmission rates before and after a HF CR intervention. No significant difference was found (t(358) = .721, p > .05). The mean of the group before the intervention (m =.15, sd = .36) was not significantly different from mean in the intervention group (m = .13, sd = .33). Implications for practice cannot completely be concluded from this project findings. Continued studies focusing on the enrollment, attendance, and completion of the HF CR program could assist in determining the benefits of referring all patients with the diagnosis of HF to the HF CR program.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05-01