Matching Items (6)

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I Can't Handle Our Stress: "" Associations between Emotion Dysregulation and Couples' Experiences of Internal Stress from an Observational Study

Description

Prior research has found an association between individual's resports of emotion dysregulation and experiences of stress; however, little work has been done to examine these constructs in the context of

Prior research has found an association between individual's resports of emotion dysregulation and experiences of stress; however, little work has been done to examine these constructs in the context of romantic relationships. To address this gap in the literature, the present study investigated the proposed association between individual reports of emotion dysregulation and experiences of internal stress. Additionally, data taken from couples' real-time conversations examined how reports of emotion dysregulation were associated with feelings about one's partner following an internal stress conversation. Data from 44 heterosexual romantic couples was used at two time points, baseline and momentary interaction data. Results did not show support for an association between emotion dysregulation and internal stress, however some support was found for an association between emotion dysregulation and negative feelings felt due to one's partner after a stressful conversation. Implications for future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Relationship Satisfaction Across Fourteen Days: A Smartphone-Based Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

Description

Almost sixty percent of adults within the United States are in a married or committed, cohabiting relationship. This study sought to examine the trajectory of relationship satisfaction over 14 consecutive

Almost sixty percent of adults within the United States are in a married or committed, cohabiting relationship. This study sought to examine the trajectory of relationship satisfaction over 14 consecutive days employing an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) method. Daily reports of relationship satisfaction were collected via a smartphone application developed from the LifeData platform. Phone-based interview questions posed one week after the 14-day EMA period afforded evaluation of usability and acceptability, in preparation for a much larger study of couples coping with cancer. Twenty-seven adults in a married or committed, cohabitating relationship served as participants, recruited from researchmatch.org. (These individuals were not coping with cancer.) Participants received a smartphone notification between 7:30pm and 8:30pm each day, with 45 minutes to begin recording their responses. A single item from the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (item #31) was used to assess relationship satisfaction. Findings revealed a marginally significant increase in satisfaction over the course of 14 days (b = 0.04, t = 1.85, p = .077). In addition, an intraclass correlation (ICC) value of 0.59 indicated larger between-person variability than within-person variability, suggesting that satisfaction varies more from one individual to another than it does within individuals over time. Finally, plots of mean relationship satisfaction by the standard deviation of relationship satisfaction showed lower variability in day-to-day satisfaction among those who were on average more satisfied with their relationship compared to those who were on average less satisfied. Feedback regarding convenience and ease of the application indicated favorable attitudes towards smartphone-based data collection.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Time perspective as a predictor of psychological distress

Description

In 2012, there were an estimated 43.7 million adults in the United States that had a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder (US Department of Health and Human Services [HHS],

In 2012, there were an estimated 43.7 million adults in the United States that had a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder (US Department of Health and Human Services [HHS], 2013). Given the large frequency of disorders, it is beneficial to learn about what factors influence psychological distress. One construct that has been increasingly examined in association with mental disorders is time perspective. The current study will investigate whether or not time perspective, as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), has a unique contribution to the prediction of psychological distress. Studies have shown that time perspective has been related to psychological symptomology. Also, previous studies have shown that time perspective has been related to the constructs of neuroticism and negative affect, which have also been shown to be related to psychological distress. I also included the deviation from an optimal time perspective (DOTP) as a predictor separate from the ZTPI scales. So, I investigated whether or not time perspective has a unique influence on psychological distress when controlling for the previously mentioned related constructs. I also controlled for gender and age by including them as covariates in the regression analyses. I found that the past positive sub-scale and DOTP were significant predictors of psychological distress. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Exploring the Within- and Between-Person Effects of Alcohol Use and Discrepant Drinking on Mood and Relationship Functioning

Description

Alcohol use among romantic partners is known to be related to a variety of detrimental outcomes, such as decreased relationship satisfaction and increases in conflict. However, discrepant drinking among partners

Alcohol use among romantic partners is known to be related to a variety of detrimental outcomes, such as decreased relationship satisfaction and increases in conflict. However, discrepant drinking among partners may be a stronger predictor of relationship outcomes over and above the amount of alcohol use. Currently, little is known about potential differences in the within- and between-person effects and discrepancy’s effect on mood, particularly among community samples. The current study investigated the effects of both individual and partner alcohol use, as well as discrepant drinking, on mood and relationship functioning. Data were obtained from 280 heterosexual romantic couples using a measurement burst daily dairy design over the course of one year. Actor Partner Interdependence Model and Dyadic Score Model analyses were used to investigate the effect of alcohol use and discrepant drinking on mood and relationship functioning, both at the within- and between- person levels. Specifically, analyses investigated the effects of no drinking versus moderate drinking, no drinking versus binge drinking, and moderate drinking versus binge drinking. Results revealed that while binge drinking may be related to positive outcomes proximally, the cumulative effects at the between-person level are detrimental. Moreover, discrepant drinking appears most detrimental when women outdrink their partners. These findings have important implications for refining and improving upon couples-based interventions aimed at alcohol-use problems among non-clinical couples.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Examining the neurocognitive underpinnings of coercive conflict in young adult relationships: an actor partner model approach

Description

The goal of this study was to examine the correlation between the brain's preconscious processing of relationship events and direct observation of couples' behavior during a videotaped discussion task. Although

The goal of this study was to examine the correlation between the brain's preconscious processing of relationship events and direct observation of couples' behavior during a videotaped discussion task. Although we know about the interaction dynamics within romantic relationships that portend conflict and dissatisfaction, very little is known about how individuals read interpersonal events within their relationship. Romantic partners participated in a dyadic EEG (electroencephalogram) lab session in which they played a gambling task. The gambling task consisted of three conditions: 1) individual gambling 2) watching their partners gamble and 3) gambling with advice from their partners. Following the gambling tasks, partners were videotaped discussing relationship topics. Neurocognitive reactions to winning and losing a gamble in response to partner's advice were analyzed as an Evoked Response Potential (ERP). The ERP of interest was the P300, which is associated with the brain making sense of unexpected information. Using an actor partner framework, it was found that the females' P300 predicted observed coercive interaction patterns. This finding suggests that for females with an established coercive relationship with their male partners, positive feedback was unexpected compared to losing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Going the distance

Description

Romantic relationships are often viewed as an important, meaningful part of a person's life. Most romantic relationships do not last forever. Research regarding romantic relationship satisfaction and quality have thus

Romantic relationships are often viewed as an important, meaningful part of a person's life. Most romantic relationships do not last forever. Research regarding romantic relationship satisfaction and quality have thus grown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether individuals who train for endurance events such as running, cycling, or triathlons with their romantic partner have greater relationship satisfaction and quality than do individuals who do not train with their romantic partner. Participants, 54 males and 60 females whose mean age was 33.4, completed a demographic questionnaire, the Quality of Relationships Inventory (QRI), the Perceived Relationship Quality Component (PRQC), the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS), and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS). Of these 114 participants, 52 trained with their romantic partner. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that individuals who trained with their romantic partner reported higher relationship satisfaction and quality compared to those that did not train for an endurance event with their romantic partner. There were no statistically significant differences in relationship satisfaction or relationship quality between men and women or between married individuals and dating individuals. These findings suggest that couples may benefit from engaging in shared activities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014