Matching Items (3)

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How to Create a Narrative Poetry Collection: Feminism and Reflection

Description

Through my research I had considered how feminism and reflection can be used in narrative poetry. In addition to research on narrative poetry, I had self-published a narrative poetry collection titled 100. which I self-published on Amazon through kindle and

Through my research I had considered how feminism and reflection can be used in narrative poetry. In addition to research on narrative poetry, I had self-published a narrative poetry collection titled 100. which I self-published on Amazon through kindle and a hard copy. The study of feminist poetry is looked at in my research in order to further apply feminism and reflection to narrative poetry. The joys of feminism, culture, identity, and empowerment are discussed and explained throughout my poetry collection. There are three waves of feminism, and I focused on writing in the third wave feminism which doesn’t have a cohesive argument, but focuses on sharing stories that are unique to women. As well, third wave feminism discourages patriarchy and encourages socio-political action. Some common, and re-occurring themes include my transformation process during college, spirituality (my faith), and nature. In order to further my poetry collection I had looked at many feminist authors on culture, and narrative poetry collections in order to see how the creative process works, and how I could better benefit my narrative poetry through feminism and reflection on growing up and what it means to be a woman. I had encountered and tried to reflect highly on the unique stories I have encountered being a woman raised of a Catholic identity in Ohio. This collection of poetry is meant as a reflection on my college experience as a female, and sharing the empowerment I have as a woman that I hope to share with others.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The Magic of a Good Book: Voluntary Fiction Reading Habits and Preferences of Adolescents

Description

Do adolescents read? What do they read? This purpose of this study was to examine the voluntary fiction reading experiences of secondary students. Literature was reviewed concerning the adolescent reader and voluntary fiction reading. The readers were found to be

Do adolescents read? What do they read? This purpose of this study was to examine the voluntary fiction reading experiences of secondary students. Literature was reviewed concerning the adolescent reader and voluntary fiction reading. The readers were found to be capable of making profound meanings out of text. The readers found characters, plot, learning from their books, and the desire to read more beneficial to their engagement and reading pleasure.

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Created

Date Created
2020

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Towards Indigeneity in Linguistics: Designing a Self-Assessment Tool Which Seeks to Better Equip Linguistic Students for Collaboration with Indigenous Communities

Description

This study explores positivist and Indigenous research paradigms as they relate to Indigenous language reclamation. Paradigms, as defined by Kuhn (2012) describe verifiable epistemological approaches that can be utilized in providing solutions for researchers and practitioners. Moreover, in the modern

This study explores positivist and Indigenous research paradigms as they relate to Indigenous language reclamation. Paradigms, as defined by Kuhn (2012) describe verifiable epistemological approaches that can be utilized in providing solutions for researchers and practitioners. Moreover, in the modern realm of academia, research paradigms are the keystones of research. Nevertheless, when a Eurocentric paradigm such as positivism is utilized in an Indigenous space, it can lead to further colonial trauma. Thus, through an analysis of the philosophical components from the two paradigms this study proposes a paradigmatic pivot in how linguistic students approach research. The purpose of recommending this pedagogical shift is to encourage the academy to normalize the use of Indigenous research paradigms which are intrinsically infused with Indigenous epistemologies and intercultural best practices. Furthermore, to exhibit the expediency and validity of Indigenous research paradigms, this study utilizes Walker’s (2001) Medicine Wheel paradigm to create a self-assessment tool which seeks to assist linguistic students in achieving a more relationally accountable sense of cultural awareness.

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Date Created
2019