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The Rise of the 20th Century Female Orchestral Flutist

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The first women who performed in orchestral settings were harpists who were substitute or extra players specifically hired for works requiring harp, such as Gustav Mahler’s symphonies or Maurice Ravel’s La Valse (c. 1919). It was not until flutist Doriot

The first women who performed in orchestral settings were harpists who were substitute or extra players specifically hired for works requiring harp, such as Gustav Mahler’s symphonies or Maurice Ravel’s La Valse (c. 1919). It was not until flutist Doriot Anthony Dwyer won the principal flute position in the BSO in 1952 that a woman was hired as a principal player of a major US orchestra. Following Dwyer’s lead, more women slowly earned their acceptance in professional orchestras. Focusing on the time period 1920-1950, three of the first pioneers who gained acceptance into American orchestras and were the first female orchestral players were flutists Doriot Anthony Dwyer, Lois Schaefer, and Frances Blaisdell. These women lived extraordinary lives and have inspired many generations of female flutists to continue in their footsteps pursuing their own orchestral and professional solo careers. One significant factor for the eventual increase of female musicians in the modern orchestra was the establishment of blind auditions. A blind audition is where a player performs behind a screen for an audition committee to preserve anonymity. Screens can be made of heavy cloth or a room divider that separates the player from the panel of orchestra members critiquing potential hires. This can often include the music director and other musicians. The screen conceals each player’s identity and allows the panel to focus their listening on how a candidate actually sounds versus how they may look and act while playing. Limiting stimuli to aural perception would help to mitigate bias or prejudice against race, gender, or age through the audition process.

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2020-05

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Composing Harmony: The Use of Music Therapy in a Homeless Shelter

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According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which can hinder a younger person's development cognitively, socially,

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which can hinder a younger person's development cognitively, socially, and can cause health problems such as heart disease later on in life. Examples of an ACE are death of a family member, witnessing or experiencing violence, economic hardship, or having a parent with a alcohol or drug addiction. About 70,000 of children in Arizona suffer from five or more ACEs. In this project music therapy interventions such as songwriting, lyric analysis, and recreative instrument play were used to address psychosocial needs for teens at a homeless shelter. The areas of psychosocial needs addressed in the music therapy group were: group cohesion, communication, and self regulation. Objectives were set each session in an eight week program to track progress of the above goals that were created based on the needs of the clients in this setting.

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2018-05

A Guide to Coaching Color Guard

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This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there are four sub-components.

The first is a historical research paper titled “The History and Evolution of Color Guard within Marching Band”. This paper defines what color guard is, identifies its origins, and outlines the major events that contributed to its development over time, leading up to what the sport and art of color guard has evolved into today.

The second component is a paper titled “Coaching Color Guard: My Experiences with Planning, Teaching, and Building a High School Color Guard Program”, which is a summarization of how a season of coaching color guard can be organized and examples of various learning opportunities a color guard coach could take advantage of during a season. Many education-specific teaching strategies are explained, such as the use of modeling, I do - we do - you do, whole-part-whole, scaffolding, sequencing from simple to complex, direct instruction vs. small groups, teaching to various learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), instructor/peer/group feedback, assessment, and opportunities for student contribution and creativity.

The third component is paper titled “Color Guard Coaching Resources”, which is made up of ten different documents that are examples or resources for color guard instructors. These resources are referenced in the second component of this project and include samples of flyers, audition scoring sheets, a student handbook, participation sheet, and written choreography as well as providing a list of other outside resources as well as a list of the video tutorials.

These video tutorials are the final component of this project. There are 44 tutorial videos broken up into five categories. Each video is a step-by-step teaching video demonstrating and articulating how to spin a color guard flag. The first category consists of 10 introductory videos, which discuss terms and concepts that are overarching in all of the tutorial videos. Then, there are 23 tutorials within the category titled ‘Basic Moves’. The next category of ‘Intermediate Moves’ consists of 5 teaching videos for moves that are more difficult to execute than the basic moves. The fourth category has 5 video tutorials for ‘Tosses’. The last category is called ‘Move Sequences’ and only has 1 video. This tutorial shows how some moves have similar rotation patterns and can easily be strung together to create a choreography sequence.

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2018-05

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The Walls are Alive with the Sound of Music: Music Therapy Techniques for Incarcerated Persons

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A music therapy informed music group program was created and implemented at the Maricopa Reentry Center in Phoenix. This program \u2014 entitled Building Hope Through Music \u2014 utilized music therapy techniques including lyric analysis, songwriting, singing, musical games, and guided

A music therapy informed music group program was created and implemented at the Maricopa Reentry Center in Phoenix. This program \u2014 entitled Building Hope Through Music \u2014 utilized music therapy techniques including lyric analysis, songwriting, singing, musical games, and guided visualization in order to improve self-awareness, provide a medium for self-expression, increase teamwork and collaboration, promote relaxation, facilitate emotional processing and awareness, and improve tolerance of non-preferred activities in participants. This group was conducted for seven months and had participation from over 400 male ex-offenders.

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2018-05

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The Effects of Embodied Cognition and Dialogic Reading on Children's Literacy Skills

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Both dialogic reading and embodied cognition have showed to be effective strategies in the development of early literacy skills. Additionally, the use of electronic books has been found to also have a positive effect, including in combination with dialogic reading.

Both dialogic reading and embodied cognition have showed to be effective strategies in the development of early literacy skills. Additionally, the use of electronic books has been found to also have a positive effect, including in combination with dialogic reading. The effectiveness of dialogic reading and embodied strategy while reading an e-book has not been compared. The purpose of the study is to determine if embodied cognition can improve dialogic reading practices and possibly offer a theoretical framework for why dialogical reading practices work. Additionally, this study aims to determine the impact of embodied cognition and dialogic reading on the development of both vocabulary and story recall skills in preschool-aged children. Twenty-nine preschool children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old took part in a matched pairs experiment that included reading an e-book. Children in the experimental groups received four readings of either an embodied cognition condition or a dialogic reading condition. Following the four readings, the groups switched treatment. The children who received the embodied cognition conditions scored significantly higher on both story recall and vocabulary acquisition compared to those in the dialogic reading and control groups. Results of the study suggest embodied cognition in conjugation with dialogic reading practices could provide a more effective and improved model for promoting early literacy skills.

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2018-05

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Insulin Resistance: Insulin and Glucose Metabolism in Rats Fed a High Fat Diet

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In post-industrialized societies, increased consumption of fat-rich diets has been correlated to increasing rates of metabolic disorders, such as Type II Diabetes, which is further linked to insulin resistance. Due to this modern epidemic, it has become exceedingly important to

In post-industrialized societies, increased consumption of fat-rich diets has been correlated to increasing rates of metabolic disorders, such as Type II Diabetes, which is further linked to insulin resistance. Due to this modern epidemic, it has become exceedingly important to learn more about these disorders with the ultimate goal of developing more effective treatments. With an overall focus on insulin resistance, the main purposes of this study were to (1) differentiate between two types of insulin resistance and their corresponding measurements and to (2) demonstrate metabolic changes that occur in response to overconsumption of a calorically dense diet. This was accomplished over a 23-week timespan by applying statistical analysis to periodically measured fasting insulin and blood glucose levels in rats fed either a high fat diet or low fat (chow) diet. Body weights were also recorded. The results of this study showed that rats fed a high fat diet experienced fasting hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance compared to rats fed a chow diet, and that the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) scale and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (ISGD) measure different types of insulin resistance. This study was unique in the fact that hepatic insulin resistance and peripheral insulin resistance were differentiated in the same rat.

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2019-05

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Creative Process of Poetry Collection: “korean mourning rituals”

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My journey with “korean mourning rituals” began in search of understanding myself. Like many others, I use poetry as an emotional outlet, and as a way of understanding why I feel the way I do. Sometimes, even being able to

My journey with “korean mourning rituals” began in search of understanding myself. Like many others, I use poetry as an emotional outlet, and as a way of understanding why I feel the way I do. Sometimes, even being able to put a name to what I feel. “korean mourning rituals” is a poetry collection comprised of 30 poems, created over the span of two years. “korean mourning rituals” is an accumulation of poems about intergenerational trauma, romantic relationships, family matters, and navigating the colonial settler state as a Korean american womxn. In this paper, I will be dissecting one poem selected for “korean mourning rituals,” and its editing process. Additionally, I will be discussing what I have planned for distribution of “korean mourning rituals,” as well as the self-publishing process and the different avenues I sought out.

One of the poems in my collection, “and the paperwork asks for my family’s history of mental health,” I dissect the intergenerational trauma of my Korean American family as a way to understand the guilt, sorrow, and difficulties buried within me. Intergenerational trauma is trauma transferred through the generations, even if those beyond the first-generation did not directly experience the traumatic incidents (Bombay, Matheson, Anisman, 2). This intergenerational trauma, when specifically tied to Koreans, is called, “han.” “Han” is described as a cultural phenomenon, that scholars often have trouble defining. Theologian Suh Nam-dong describes han as, “a feeling of unresolved resentment against injustices suffered, a sense of helplessness because of the overwhelming odds against one, a feeling of acute pain in one's guts and bowels, making the whole body writhe and squirm, and an obstinate urge to take revenge and to right the wrong—all these combined,” (Yoo, 221). Han, when applied to the Korean diaspora, is referred to as “postmemory han,” which refers to the feelings of han experienced by second-generation Korean Americans. “Postmemory han” is the idea that even if these second-generation Korean Americans did not directly experience the trauma the first-generation Koreans did, they still feel residual han, regardless of whether they actively pursue “remembering” their family’s trauma (Chu, 98-105). This “nonconsensual remembering,” is a concept I have, and continue to, explore throughout my written work, and is the nucleus of “korean mourning rituals.”

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2019-05

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Inclusive Band: Music Learning for Students with Special Needs

Description

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the start until Spring 2019 when there was a shift in membership. This caused the Peer Mentors to have to move to new groups. Some moved to a Music Student that played the same instrument while others were because a member graduated or left Inclusive Band and were replaced by new members. This transition was hard for both Peer Mentors and Music Students. The Music Students were used to their Peer Mentors and built a strong friendship with them. Losing them was hard and some still struggle with it several months later. The Peer Mentors also had difficulties adjusting to teaching a different Music Student. They did not know their strengths and weaknesses or the best way to teach them. This challenge led to the creation of the handbook, which is a guide for future members of Inclusive Band to aid with the transition from semester to semester.

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2019-05

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Leveraging Low-Cost Incentives to Encourage Student Performance in Online Courses

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Students in an online course can face diminished incentives to exert effort and focus without the structure of instructor-paced material. To introduce new motivation to spend more time with course material, this paper examines the use of A/B split test

Students in an online course can face diminished incentives to exert effort and focus without the structure of instructor-paced material. To introduce new motivation to spend more time with course material, this paper examines the use of A/B split test content experiments. One group of students is exposed to a set of hidden hyperlinks ("Easter Eggs") within the course and earns trivially small amounts of course credit for finding them. While controlling for demographics and initial effort, finding each additional Easter Egg is associated with a 0.8 percentage point increase in final grade. This effect is even stronger for low performers: for those below the median grade before the first Easter Egg, each find increases final grade by 1.3 points. The treatment advantages low-performing students more than their high-achieving counterparts, thus helping to reduce the education gap at extremely low cost to course developers.

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2019-05

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Facilitating Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio

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This thesis presents a new study “Fostering Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio” which gathered pedagogical techniques that collegiate woodwind professors use to foster student autonomy in their woodwind studios. This study defines “student autonomy” as an end-goal of

This thesis presents a new study “Fostering Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio” which gathered pedagogical techniques that collegiate woodwind professors use to foster student autonomy in their woodwind studios. This study defines “student autonomy” as an end-goal of education, in which students are “self-monitoring, strategizing, and taking responsibility for and ownership of the learning process.” A survey of questions concerning student autonomy was emailed to each of the appointed woodwind studio professors at ASU. Their responses are presented and analyzed in this thesis. The author hypothesized that the professors would show some understanding of various methods that can achieve student autonomy, but the study results showed that the professors had much knowledge and specific examples on how to achieve student autonomy in their studios. All of the participants cited examples of using indirect teaching, peer-learning, student-selected repertoire with teacher guidance, student goal-setting, and practical autonomy in their woodwind studios to facilitate student autonomy. About half of the participants cited examples of using student-to-teacher rapport, technology-mediated feedback, and diversified autonomy in their studios to facilitate student autonomy. Student-selected repertoire was by far the most popular method through which to foster student autonomy. This study found that further research is needed to prove if there is indeed a positive correlation between students who compose music for their woodwind lessons and their level of autonomous learning.

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2019-05