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P. aeruginosa Biofilm Inhibition and Dispersion by Peptide and Synbody Treatment

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Bacteria with antibiotic resistance are becoming a growing concern as the number of infections they are causing continue to increase. Many potential solutions are being researched in order to combat

Bacteria with antibiotic resistance are becoming a growing concern as the number of infections they are causing continue to increase. Many potential solutions are being researched in order to combat these pathogens. One such microbe is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes acute and chronic human infections. It frequently colonizes the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and is deadly. For these reasons, P. aeruginosa has been heavily studied in order to determine a solution to antibiotic resistance. One possible solution is the development of synbodies, which have been developed at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Synbodies are constructed from peptides that have antibacterial activity and were determined to have specificity for a target bacterium. These synbodies were tested in this study to determine whether or not some of them are able to inhibit P. aeruginosa growth. P. aeruginosa can also form multicellular communities called biofilms and these are known to cause approximately 65% of all human infections. After conducting minimum inhibitory assays, the efficacy of certain peptides and synbodies against biofilm inhibition was assessed. A recent study has shown that low concentrations of a specific peptide can cause biofilm disruption, where the biofilm structure breaks apart and the cells within it disperse into the supernatant. Taking into account this study and peptide data regarding biofilm inhibition from Dr. Aurélie Crabbé’s lab, screened peptides were tested against biofilm to see if dispersion would occur.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05