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A Study of the Resources Provided by Police Departments in Maricopa County to Victims Left Behind After a Domestic Homicide

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The purpose of this study was to investigate: 1) within police departments in Maricopa County, exactly who helps the families left behind after a domestic homicide occurs? 2) What kind of short-term resources are offered by the police to immediately

The purpose of this study was to investigate: 1) within police departments in Maricopa County, exactly who helps the families left behind after a domestic homicide occurs? 2) What kind of short-term resources are offered by the police to immediately help the family and any children affected? And 3) are long-term services provided to the family and children of domestic homicide victims, and if not, to where is the family referred? To answer these questions, employees from each of the 14 city police departments in Maricopa County were interviewed. Participants answered a serious of both open-ended and scale questions either via email or over the phone. This study found that all police departments in cities of Maricopa County (with the exception of Litchfield Park, which is covered by the Sherriff's Office) have what is referred to as a Victim Services Unit. This is a small team comprised of social workers and other employees specifically trained to provide a continuation of support to victims from the crisis period through the investigative and judicial processes. In terms of services provided, this study found that most of the services offered to victims through police departments in Maricopa County are short-term in nature and fall under one of the following categories: On-scene crisis intervention and initial needs-assessments, immediate basic needs and referrals, financial resources, counseling, family advocacy centers, legal advocacy and assistance with the criminal process, or Child Protective Services. Results also indicated a positive relationship between city size and the amount of resources provided to victims after a homicide. Finally, in regards to long-term resources, this study found in general, all long-term needs are handled by social service agencies and non-profits, which victims are connected to by police departments after a needs assessment has been conducted. Based on these findings, a number of recommendations were made to Purple Ribbon Council, a domestic abuse prevention and supportive care non-profit that were designed to help Purple Ribbon Council increase its reach and effectiveness.

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Created

Date Created
2013-05

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ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVENESS OF CRISIS CALLS TO TEEN LIFELINE

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I would first like to thank Nikki Kontz, my project liaison from Teen Lifeline for her support and collaboration throughout the entire project. Secondly, I would like to thank my project mentor Professor Larry Dumka for his invaluable guidance, whose

I would first like to thank Nikki Kontz, my project liaison from Teen Lifeline for her support and collaboration throughout the entire project. Secondly, I would like to thank my project mentor Professor Larry Dumka for his invaluable guidance, whose help as well as that of the entire CARE cohort made the project possible. Last but not least, a special thanks goes out to the Teen Lifeline crisis counselors and staff for gathering all the data needed to complete this study. Lastly, I would like to thank Carlos Valiente and Erin Pahlke who took the time to serve on my thesis committee.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

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Examining adolescents' gender stereotypes and ingroup biases about academics, classroom regulatory behavior, and occupations

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The major goal of the current study was to extend previous research on adolescents' gender stereotyping by assessing adolescents' academic, classroom regulatory behavior, and occupational gender stereotypes. This was done by creating new measures of academic and classroom regulation gender

The major goal of the current study was to extend previous research on adolescents' gender stereotyping by assessing adolescents' academic, classroom regulatory behavior, and occupational gender stereotypes. This was done by creating new measures of academic and classroom regulation gender stereotypes. Using these measures, adolescents' gender stereotypes in core academic subjects, school in general, and classroom behavior were assessed. The coherence of adolescents' stereotypes was also examined. Participants were 257 7th grade students (M age = 12 years old, range 11-13 years old; 47% male. Students were administered surveys containing several measures of stereotyping. The results indicated that, for academic subjects, contrary to expectations, very few adolescents held traditional gender stereotypes; instead, most endorsed egalitarian views. Moreover, unexpected patterns emerged in which adolescents reported counter-traditional academic stereotypes. When sex differences were found in stereotyping patterns, they could be explained in part by ingroup bias. Approximately half of the students stereotyped classroom regulatory behaviors and occupations. Results provided support for the coherence of gender stereotypes such that students who stereotyped in one domain tended to stereotype in other domains. Strengths and limitations of the present study were discussed. Potentially important steps remain for research on the relation between academic gender stereotyping and academic performance.

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Date Created
2012