Matching Items (16)

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Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristics \u2014 Geographic Location

Description

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the four preexisting student college choice models. Over the past couple of decades, multiple different student college choice models have been created in order to define the process in which a student decides specifically on a college. The combined models that are analyzed within this study are: Chapman model (1981), Jackson model (1982), Hanson and Litten model (1989) and Hossler and Gallagher Model (1987). The focus on combined models in this literature review, ensures that all the models incorporate the rational assumptions seen in economic models and also analyze the components of status attainment models (Jackson, 1982). The four combined models will present various influences and factors that play a part within the student decision to overall attend college and then go on to define how a student chooses a specific college. Multiple different models analyzed within this study discuss how particular college characteristics play an ample role in the college student choice process. One of the biggest college characteristics seen within all four models, is the influence of college location on the decision making process. With location playing a vital role within the college choice decision, the factor of an institution's geographic location (in-state vs. out-of-state) will be analyzed in relation to these preexisting models.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Peer Mentorship in Higher Education

Description

It is widely accepted that mentorship between people of similar backgrounds and slightly different ages is a mutually beneficial partnership (e.g., Angelique, Kyle, & Taylor, 2002; Yomtov, 2017). Mentoring relationships

It is widely accepted that mentorship between people of similar backgrounds and slightly different ages is a mutually beneficial partnership (e.g., Angelique, Kyle, & Taylor, 2002; Yomtov, 2017). Mentoring relationships exist in many forms across the education spectrum, from middle school students interacting with their younger peers to the popular “Big-Little system” adopted by fraternity and sorority groups in U.S. colleges and universities, and beyond educational settings throughout the working world. However, one place where mentoring has received relatively less attention, from researchers as well as from practitioners, is in undergraduate student leadership-focused organizations at the college level.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Been There, Done That: Peer Coaching and Community Cultural Wealth

Description

Peer coaching is an emerging approach higher education institutions are using to increase student success outcomes for first-year students. This study examined how peer coaches use their community cultural wealth

Peer coaching is an emerging approach higher education institutions are using to increase student success outcomes for first-year students. This study examined how peer coaches use their community cultural wealth with the students they coach and how coaching encouraged first-generation students to access the community cultural wealth they bring with them to college. The theoretical framework guiding this study was Yosso’s theory of community cultural wealth. I used a qualitative approach and interviewed five peer coaches and conducted focus groups with 15 first-generation, first-year students who had received coaching. Findings indicate peer coaches used the six dimensions of community cultural wealth with students they coach, including aspirational, familial, linguistic, navigational, resistant, and social capital. Students also reported peer coaching helped them access their community cultural wealth, especially as compared to advising and faculty interactions. Three key differentiators emerged when comparing coaching to other forms of support: relatability, sense of belonging, and self-confidence.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Developing Teacher Leader Identity Through Community of Practice

Description

ABSTRACT

This action research case study explored the ways participation in a teacher leader learning community contributed to the identity development of teacher leaders at the Canajoharie Central School District. The

ABSTRACT

This action research case study explored the ways participation in a teacher leader learning community contributed to the identity development of teacher leaders at the Canajoharie Central School District. The goal of the study was to identify how a teacher leader learning community supported the identity of teacher leaders in their work. This action research study used a case study methodology and included qualitative and quantitative data collection. Purposive sampling identified six participants for the study. The qualitative data collection included initial and final one-on-one semi-structured interviews, meeting observation notes, research journal entries and peer interaction logs. Quantitative data were gathered using pre- and post- innovation surveys. Participants completed a pre-innovation survey and initial interview prior to the start of the innovation. Structured teacher leader learning community meetings were conducted over a four-month period of time in the Fall of 2018. Study participants led the design of collaborative group norms and meeting protocols. Participants facilitated the teacher leader learning community meetings. At the conclusion of the study period participants completed a post-innovation survey and final interview. Meeting observation notes, research journal entries and peer interaction log data were collected during the study period.

Analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data of this study suggests that teacher leader identity is supported by participation in a structured teacher leader learning community. Teacher leaders benefitted from a formal structure through which to share successes, problem-solve situations and continue growth as leaders. The findings also suggest that meeting norms and protocols benefit the work of the teacher leaders in the learning community. These findings are consistent with previous research studies which indicate that teacher leaders need opportunities to come together and network to sustain their work. The findings from this action research study may assist other school districts in supporting teacher leaders in their local context.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Translating Teacher’s Manuals into Digital Presentations: PowerPoint Presentations as Educative Curriculum Materials

Description

This action research study primarily examined how educative curriculum materials (i.e., curriculum materials that include supports for teacher learning) can improve a teacher’s knowledge base and ability to succeed in

This action research study primarily examined how educative curriculum materials (i.e., curriculum materials that include supports for teacher learning) can improve a teacher’s knowledge base and ability to succeed in the classroom. The focus was on the impact of one type of educative curriculum material: PowerPoint presentations. Specifically, the study investigated if translating teacher’s manuals into digital presentations was valued by general education teachers responsible for teaching Engage NY math in kindergarten, first, second, and third grades. The study asked teacher participants to describe the impact (if any) of adding a digital presentation component to their lessons and investigated if they self-reported increased Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), which is a teacher’s understanding of how to help students understand specific subject matter. Using questionnaires, interviews, and field notes, the following research questions were examined: 1) How do teachers describe the impact that pre-made digital slide share presentations (i.e., PowerPoint presentations) have on lesson planning, preparation, and pacing and 2) What impact does translating teacher’s manuals into digital slide share presentations (i.e., PowerPoint presentations) have on teacher’s pedagogical content knowledge? Results indicate that teacher participants found the presentations to be helpful and positively impacted their lesson planning, preparation, and pacing, and improved their perception of their own abilities when presenting Engage NY math content.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Fostering student engagement through an online community of learning: a mixed methods action research dissertation

Description

Promoting student engagement is a critical performance indicator for undergraduate success and is, therefore, a priority for academic institutions as they seek to improve teaching and learning practices (Meyer, 2014).

Promoting student engagement is a critical performance indicator for undergraduate success and is, therefore, a priority for academic institutions as they seek to improve teaching and learning practices (Meyer, 2014). Educators need to improve their instructional pedagogy by developing unique methods for engaging students with educational opportunities. Instructors who facilitate courses online face an even greater challenge in engaging students. A virtual learning community is a potential solution for improving online engagement.

This mixed methods action research dissertation explores the implementation of an online learning community and how it influences the engagement of students in distance learning environments. The primary research question guiding this inquiry is: How and to what extent does the implementation of an online learning community influence undergraduate student engagement in online courses? A sequential triangulation design was used to analyze data collected from surveys and responses collected from study participants during a synchronous online focus group. The analysis of the results of the study provide interesting insight into the online engagement of students. Key findings from the study are: 1) the inclusion of diverse perspectives is important for students and they value having opportunities to share their knowledge with peers; 2) an online learning community is beneficial for student engagement and this type of model is one they would participate in the future; 3) students experience a disconnect with peers when engagement opportunities in online discussion platforms feel insincere.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Developing a web-based hiring resource at a state medical college

Description

This study uses a sequential, mixed method, action research, quantitative to qualitative research design. The purpose of this study was to develop a useful standardized hiring process at a state

This study uses a sequential, mixed method, action research, quantitative to qualitative research design. The purpose of this study was to develop a useful standardized hiring process at a state medical college that brings clarity to the hiring process and policies. Two conceptual frameworks guided the innovations in this study – communities of practice and Kotter’s change theory. To implement a standardized hiring process, a web-based intranet site was created through collaboration between the Academic Affairs and the Human Resources Departments of the medical college. The web-based intranet was built to be a hiring resource directed at training hiring managers and hiring committees. The hiring resource assists the departments hiring by bringing clarity to the hiring process, assisting in creating a standardized process for posting, recruiting, hiring, and on-boarding new employees, and allowing managers quick access to hiring tools.

Three sources provided data for this study: (1) Pre/Post Hiring Manager/Committee Questionnaire, (2) Interviews with key hiring managers, and (3) Google Analytics.

The study found that all participants found the overall hiring resource “useful” and “effective.” All measured components of the hiring resource were also found to be “useful” and “effective.” The site continues to increase in new users and returning users weekly. The hiring resource is used regularly by the college’s Human Resources Department and is sent to all hiring managers when they begin their hiring process and is introduced in “Managing the UA Way” which is a professional development program for new managers at the college. This study shows that web-based resources are a useful and effective instrument for training staff in a medical school context. More research needs to be conducted to measure the full potential of training higher education staff via web-based and online programs. This research project hopes to inspire other higher education institutions to create, measure, and implement training programs for staff.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Retaining out-of-state freshmen at ASU

Description

College completion has become a national priority in the United States. Before students can graduate from a college or university, however, they must survive their first year in higher education.

College completion has become a national priority in the United States. Before students can graduate from a college or university, however, they must survive their first year in higher education. The retention of out-of-state freshmen is a major piece of the larger college student retention puzzle due to recent national enrollment trends and the financial implications of out-of-state student enrollment. With public universities nationwide receiving less financial support from state governments, many of these institutions have used a strategy of aggressively recruiting and increasingly enrolling out-of-state students because the higher tuition these students pay can help offset the loss of state funding. Despite the importance of out-of-state students to the national higher education landscape, little research has been conducted on out-of-state student retention.

This study examined the relation between a resource website and the engagement, sense of belonging, homesickness, and retention of out-of-state freshmen at Arizona State University (ASU). Mixed methods of inquiry were utilized; data sources included a pre- and post-intervention student survey, student interviews, student essay artifacts, website utilization records, and university retention reports.

This study demonstrated that freshmen coming to ASU from another state experienced four main challenges related to being an out-of-state student. Those challenges were homesickness, adjusting to living in Arizona, managing finances, and making friends at ASU. Out-of-state students therefore needed extra support for their transition. The study found that an out-of-state student resource website had a positive association with co-curricular engagement and homesickness frequency reduction. Moreover, the site provided useful information on the challenges experienced by out-of-state freshmen. Discussion includes possible explanations for the findings and implications for practice and research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Three essays on bureaucracy at American research universities

Description

The three essays in this dissertation each examine how aspects of contemporary administrative structure within American research universities affect faculty outcomes. Specific aspects of administrative structure tested in this dissertation

The three essays in this dissertation each examine how aspects of contemporary administrative structure within American research universities affect faculty outcomes. Specific aspects of administrative structure tested in this dissertation include the introduction of new administrative roles, administrative intensity (i.e. relative size of university administration), and competing roles between faculty, administrators, and staff. Using quantitative statistical methods these aspects of administrative structure are tested for their effects on academic grant productivity, faculty job stress, and faculty job satisfaction. Administrative datasets and large scale national surveys make up the data for these studies and quantitative statistical methods confirm most of the hypothesized relationships.

In the first essay, findings from statistical modeling using instrumental variables suggest that academic researchers who receive administrative support for grant writing and management obtain fewer grants and have a lower success rate. However, the findings also suggest that the grants these researchers do receive are much larger in terms of dollars. The results indicate that administrative support is particularly beneficial in academic grant situations of high-risk, high-reward. In the second essay, ordered logit models reveal a statistically significant and stronger relationship between staff intensity (i.e., the ratio of faculty to staff workers) and faculty stress than the relationship between executive intensity (i.e., the ratio faculty to executive and managerial workers) and faculty job stress. These findings confirm theory that the work of faculty is more loosely coupled with the work of executives than it is with staff workers. A possible explanation is the increase in administrative work faculty must take on as there are fewer staff workers to take on administrative tasks. And finally, in the third essay results from multi-level modeling confirm that both role clarity and institutional support positively affect both a global measure of faculty job satisfaction and faculty satisfaction with how their work time is allocated. Understanding the effects that administrative structure has on faculty outcomes will aid universities as faculty administrative burdens ebb and flow in reaction to macro trends in higher education, such as unbundling of faculty roles, unbundling of services, neoliberalism, liberal arts decline, and administrative bloat.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Undocuqueer: interacting and working within the intersection of LGBTQ and undocumented

Description

Employing Queer Intersectionality, this study explored how undocuqueer activists made sense of, interacted and worked within the intersection of their LGBTQ and undocumented experience. Participants ascribed three overarching self-meanings: Vulnerability,

Employing Queer Intersectionality, this study explored how undocuqueer activists made sense of, interacted and worked within the intersection of their LGBTQ and undocumented experience. Participants ascribed three overarching self-meanings: Vulnerability, Complexity, and Resilience. These self-meanings describe the ways participants perceived the interplay of their gender, sexuality and immigration status within the current sociopolitical context of the U.S. Recognizing their vulnerability within a state of illegibility, participants described a sense of exclusion within spaces of belonging, and wariness managing relationships with others; opting for more complex self-definitions, they resisted simplistic conceptions of identity that rendered their social locations invisible (e.g., homonormativity, heteronormativity, DREAMer); and describing themselves as resilient, they described surviving societal as well as familial rejection even when surviving seemed impossible to do so. Interacting and working within the intersection of gender, sexuality and immigration status, participants described identity negotiation and coming out as a form of resistance to institutionalized oppression, and resilience amidst simultaneous anti-immigrant, xenophobic and heterosexist power structures. Participants learned to live in multiple worlds at the same time, and embrace the multiplicity of their undocuqueer identity while seeking to bridge their communities through stories, activism and peer education. This study has implications for further understanding the way that queer politics and identity interact/ relate with various axes of inequality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015